Bud Wolf Chevrolet will shut its doors

Bud Wolf Chevrolet will shut its doors

There are 107 comments on the The Indianapolis Star story from Jan 16, 2008, titled Bud Wolf Chevrolet will shut its doors. In it, The Indianapolis Star reports that:

Hurt by the public's negative image of American cars, Bud Wolf Chevrolet will close its dealership at 5350 N. Keystone Ave.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Indianapolis Star.

Prissy Jones

United States

#44 Jan 17, 2008
We buy and use American products all the time: Software, the entertainment we watch, the airplanes in which we fly, the computer and communications systems over which we communicate, the insurance and finacial services we consume, the business systems we implement, the restaunts where we eat etc.

And we export such products worldwide.Just look at the field offices in any large industrial or office park in Europe or Asia. Granted, many of the electronics are not physically made in America, but most of the high-end design and development jobs are located here. Of course, "location" is also a fuzy concept in the information age. I receive work to do from all over the world as a freelancer on electronic file attachments. I process it and send it back to the customers. Some of this work I do while I am on personal or business trips in other countries or states. I guess the concept of "location" could be viewed as just whatever permanent address you claim for your taxes.

Of course, you have to have a certain sophistication and degree of education to particpate in such and economy. That is where the issue lies. To the contrary, most American products are of high quality and successful. We have just shifted to "high-end" and are falling behind in some "old industry" areas such as Automobile mfg that have tended to dominate old-economy cities such as Detroit and Indy.

I say fine with this tradeoff and most of America agrees with me. But then most of America is not in Detroit and Indianapolis and obsessed with the Auto industry and union workers who think they should be shielded from the competive forces of the labor market.

"American" products are overall highly successful, but not the auto industry. There is really no need for such a thing as a "recovery." The stink is all of those uneducated union "brothers" loose their jobs and many rust belt cities do not have enough educated citizens to fill the economic void.
American wrote:
Overall, I think it's a shame to see this closing. I do hope American products make a comeback. I try hard to buy American and it's difficult.
SomeGuy

Indianapolis, IN

#45 Jan 17, 2008
Prissy Jones wrote:
Well, I have always had really bad luck with American cars and I have been hearing the "closing the gap" argument for the last 20 years or so. It that ole' just never seems to be "closed" because the foreign companies are still improving qauality and efficiency at a fster rate tha the Americans.
<quoted text>
That has not been my experience actually but I know it has for some. My 95 Ford Ranger is approaching 300,000 miles without having any significant repairs outside of the usual suspects. "Closing the gap" has been argued for many years but I do hold some hope that it is now more truth than marketing. The "gap" or lack of one is now backed up by quantitative data. It is not true that foreign competition is improving quality at a faster rate and in fact has suffered setbacks in the last couple of years. Even Consumer Reports (I am a subscriber), historically very critical of domestics, has started to have more positive things to say, particularly about GM vehicles. And btw, I have absolutely no affiliation with any car manufacturer or union of any type. I am not a big advocate of the union. The gap in quality may have diminished but the gap in the cost of manufacturing each vehicle has not and the union has a lot to do with it.
wooooosh

New York, NY

#46 Jan 17, 2008
Prissy Jones wrote:
You have that correct!
Union American auto workers wanted! Lazy? No education? Want to make an inferior product?..no problem. We will pay you $60-120K per year to do so. And we wander why the foreign cars are winning in every class of automobile. I wouldn't accept an American car, if they gave it to me.
And to all of you unemployed auto workers: It is just too bad. You should have received an education and learned additional skills, instead of trying to keep it as dumb as possibe by focusing on one narrow skill set just enough to keep those paychecks coming.
Now welcome to the real world in which the rest of us live and work. By the way, have fun competing in the information age with your antiquated high school or GED level education and limited skill set! You did it to yourselves!
<quoted text>
This delivery is a bit harsh, but the underlying message is correct. One of the problems with unions over the years was they never encouraged members to seek additional skills, and now we're stuck with a glut of under-educated workers. On top of that, large american industry and unions in the 50-70s created this woeful pension system that continues to drain what's left of our companies. Airlines, Auto, Manufacturing, same boat. I feel bad for my fellow workers, but I'm not crying for them while I study for the GMAT.
Speedway Resident

Indianapolis, IN

#47 Jan 17, 2008
Prissy Jones wrote:
You have that correct!
Union American auto workers wanted! Lazy? No education? Want to make an inferior product?..no problem. We will pay you $60-120K per year to do so. And we wander why the foreign cars are winning in every class of automobile. I wouldn't accept an American car, if they gave it to me.
And to all of you unemployed auto workers: It is just too bad. You should have received an education and learned additional skills, instead of trying to keep it as dumb as possibe by focusing on one narrow skill set just enough to keep those paychecks coming.
Now welcome to the real world in which the rest of us live and work. By the way, have fun competing in the information age with your antiquated high school or GED level education and limited skill set! You did it to yourselves!
<quoted text>
Is this Prissy Jones or Bitchy Jones! No need to kick people when they're down.
jack

Indianapolis, IN

#48 Jan 17, 2008
Luke wrote:
The unions have ruined this country.Its no wonder that so many companies have moved overseas.If it is union made,do not buy it.
Move to China dhead
Activist

Fishers, IN

#49 Jan 17, 2008
Doesn't surprise us at all. This is a high profile causality. It's caused by excessive taxation.

Heard on Neal Boortz program yesterday:

Chrysler Daimler when they merged with Mercedes had tax experts crunch the numbers to find whether it was less expensive to locate in Germany or America. The tax consultants concluded that locating the newly merged company in Germany would net 14% tax savings.

America's taxation policies are driving our resources off shore and our manufacturing overseas.

When will the Government figure it out? The people want repeal of all taxes except a consumption tax on new goods only.

For more reading:
www.FairTax.org

Local tax news:
www.HoosiersForFairTaxation.com
wooooosh

New York, NY

#50 Jan 17, 2008
lock wrote:
<quoted text>
What a complete Idiot! I have been warned that this is offensive, what about the complete untruth about Unions and the part that they have played in the prosperity of the last 100 years. You will find out once they are gone and you are making 1 dollar a day as your great grandfather did. Do some research and find out what the Labor Movement has really done for this country.
Good point, that unions did wonders for wages in the middle of the 20th century. That was all fine in 1960 when there were only 1 or 2 major manufacturers in each industry, and Europe and Japan were just working out their strengths after the post-WWII rebuilding, and no one needed to think outside the box. But the problem now is that unions, along with big business leaders at the time (such as the Ford family), made short-term deals at the expense of long-term strategic planning. Part of what is weighing on big manufacturing today is 1) the higher wages paid to workers took away from R&D and other investments back into the companies, and 2) the pension obligations for retired workers became absurdly high. So the current CEO looks at this ridiculous expenditure for workers he no longer employs, and sees that his company hasn't made any innovative product changes and is no "un-cool", and decides to find suppliers overseas who will do the work faster and cheaper, and employ foreign engineers (for 1/3rd the cost) who are hungry to innovate. Read "The World is Flat" by Thomas Friedman or "Supercapitalism" by Robert Reich and you'll get a very humble view of the ills of America, the gains of the rest of the world, and what we have to do to adapt and compete. Understanding your current environment is one, and Wolff Chevy did a bad job of that.
KrannertMBA08

Bringhurst, IN

#51 Jan 17, 2008
TO PRISSY JONES:

Although I do not agree completely with the points you have made in your posts, I respect your positions. However, allow me to step on a soapbox for one moment. Your last post mentioned "those uneducated citizens to fill the economic void". Now, not to be overly harsh, but humor me if you will. I realize we all respond to comments on this board very quickly, and in our haste we overlook some items. But one may classify someone else as an "uneducated citizen" based on the exhibits below;

"fuzy"
"competive"
"loose their jobs"
"definately"
"improving qauality and efficiency at a fster rate tha the Americans"
"And we wander why the foreign cars..."

Arguments can be strengthened if those making the points follow their own advice.
MK neighbor-custome r

Indianapolis, IN

#52 Jan 17, 2008
I am sadden to hear that Bud Wolf is closing and we have a 2002 Malibu that we purchased from his dealership. Despite high cost for service and maintainence, insurance, license taxes, etc; the car is now a gas guzzer loser due to high fuel cost today. I live just down the road (54th Street & Broadway) and it was convient to have the Malibu serviced nearby instead of driving out to the Carmel auto dealers strip area.
I too worry about the detoriating quality of life in my neighborhood...punishing real estate taxes, crime,
aging structures, and the cost is getting higher and higher than I can afford.

After WWII, Mercedes-Benz designed and built cars to last for a long time and they were bult for exports not for German consumption because the only economic power who had the money to by "expensive cars" were the American consumers who could afford them. Since then, the quailty of Mercedes-Benz is now like the "American standards" short term and desiged for short term
in time to go to the bank and refiance a car loan.

The American standard is designed to our dependancy to have needs for transportation and to further deepen us into debts forever!

There never was any "savings" desinged for cars
to last a long time after you paid off the car loan. Everyone of them have ended up as a cube in the junkyard!

So audieu to you Bud Wolf and maybe you can now market the Asian/Chinese car brands in the future.
Prissy Jones

United States

#53 Jan 17, 2008
Well, if you were truly a fellow Purdue grad you would realize that attacking someone's typos is a logical fallacy and is only a ploy to distract from the points in the argument. They should have at least taught you that those blow-off OLS classes through which you slept.

I guess I should stop multi-tasking and carefully check for typos before I post, but then that would be a waste of my time; even more so than taking the energy to post on here in the first place.
KrannertMBA08 wrote:
TO PRISSY JONES:
Although I do not agree completely with the points you have made in your posts, I respect your positions. However, allow me to step on a soapbox for one moment. Your last post mentioned "those uneducated citizens to fill the economic void". Now, not to be overly harsh, but humor me if you will. I realize we all respond to comments on this board very quickly, and in our haste we overlook some items. But one may classify someone else as an "uneducated citizen" based on the exhibits below;
"fuzy"
"competive"
"loose their jobs"
"definately"
"improving qauality and efficiency at a fster rate tha the Americans"
"And we wander why the foreign cars..."
Arguments can be strengthened if those making the points follow their own advice.
Speedway Resident

Indianapolis, IN

#54 Jan 17, 2008
KrannertMBA08 wrote:
Very well said Krannert!
Speedway Resident

Indianapolis, IN

#55 Jan 17, 2008
KrannertMBA08 wrote:
TO PRISSY JONES:
Although I do not agree completely with the points you have made in your posts, I respect your positions. However, allow me to step on a soapbox for one moment. Your last post mentioned "those uneducated citizens to fill the economic void". Now, not to be overly harsh, but humor me if you will. I realize we all respond to comments on this board very quickly, and in our haste we overlook some items. But one may classify someone else as an "uneducated citizen" based on the exhibits below;
"fuzy"
"competive"
"loose their jobs"
"definately"
"improving qauality and efficiency at a fster rate tha the Americans"
"And we wander why the foreign cars..."
Arguments can be strengthened if those making the points follow their own advice.
I'll buy you beer and dinner! You're great!
mediagiant

United States

#56 Jan 17, 2008
Prissy Jones wrote:
Sure. Why not? They sell cars at some supermarkets in Europe. If you have any trouble, or need warranty work, you just call the toll free number for help. If they can not solve it, they will direct you to the local service center and/or send a two truck and bring a rental, if needed. This concept saves land/space, time, overhead and is a much more efficient supply chain that actually rpovides better service.
Traditional car dealers are no longer needed. They should go the way of a '62 Chrysler with tailfins. Why shouldn't cars be purchased and serviced just like any other commidty?
Why not pick up a car at Waltmart, along with your new T.V and a bundle of carrots? Then maybe that Chinese car could be made out of recyclable material so it could just be discarded like an aluminum can after the end of its life.
The current car dealership system in America is a waste. The American auto industry still seems to be stuck in the 1950s-70s in oh so many ways. I guess one will always try to relive their glory days, regardless of how much failure and ridicule it will bring them in modern times.
<quoted text>
Although part of me is intrigued by this concept, keep in mind that a car is a big-ticket purchase item, and it takes really informed people (i.e., salespeople) to help customers distinguish between the competing makes and models on the market today. Have you looked through a car brochure recently? If you're really committed to doing your research, you might read it all but I don't think most people are that dedicated.

I always read expert reviews before I make a major purchase, but I may be the exception and not the rule. Guess what -- the experts agree that even my Hyundai could mop the floor with a Chevy. I love my Hyundai, and I got a great deal on it.
Buy American

Indianapolis, IN

#57 Jan 17, 2008
As one with relatives that fought both in Europe and the Japanese occupied territories I don't like to buy foreign products unless it's absolutely necessary. Keep buying your Japanese government subsidized cars while the American economy goes down the toilet. American companies have been moving overseas in record numbers because the US government promotes it and subsidizes those moves. How else can the North American Union ever come to fruition.
KrannertMBA08

Bringhurst, IN

#58 Jan 17, 2008
Wow.

Do I know you? No, I do not. The only thing I know about you is that you attack people in a certain class of employment as being "uneducated" without knowing them. Seeing as how you struggle to spell simple English words, I find it fair to question your position. I apologize for assuming that a)you can spell and b)you can take two minutes to proofread your argument. They should have taught you that during your elementary school English classes that you must have slept through.

Now, do you know me? No, you don't. For the record, my academic transcript from Purdue is void of any OLS courses. If you would like to know more about the academic requirements of one of the nation's top business schools and its MBA program, I would be glad to share them with you.
Prissy Jones

United States

#59 Jan 17, 2008
You just don't like me because you live in Speedway and are most probably a union guy or gal over at Alison or another plant.

Now, you have found somebody on here who is articulate enough to take the jab at me that you never could.
Speedway Resident wrote:
<quoted text>
I'll buy you beer and dinner! You're great!
Prissy Jones

United States

#60 Jan 17, 2008
Well, you don't have to because I am also a graduate of the same institution. Newbie!

And the OLS class, as easy as it would have been, would have been, would have helped you to avoid attacking an argument based on spelling.
KrannertMBA08 wrote:
Wow.
Do I know you? No, I do not. The only thing I know about you is that you attack people in a certain class of employment as being "uneducated" without knowing them. Seeing as how you struggle to spell simple English words, I find it fair to question your position. I apologize for assuming that a)you can spell and b)you can take two minutes to proofread your argument. They should have taught you that during your elementary school English classes that you must have slept through.
Now, do you know me? No, you don't. For the record, my academic transcript from Purdue is void of any OLS courses. If you would like to know more about the academic requirements of one of the nation's top business schools and its MBA program, I would be glad to share them with you.
Prissy Jones

United States

#61 Jan 17, 2008
ANd here arte sum aditinal tipos for u to netpik, just like the last poost.
KrannertMBA08 wrote:
Wow.
Do I know you? No, I do not. The only thing I know about you is that you attack people in a certain class of employment as being "uneducated" without knowing them. Seeing as how you struggle to spell simple English words, I find it fair to question your position. I apologize for assuming that a)you can spell and b)you can take two minutes to proofread your argument. They should have taught you that during your elementary school English classes that you must have slept through.
Now, do you know me? No, you don't. For the record, my academic transcript from Purdue is void of any OLS courses. If you would like to know more about the academic requirements of one of the nation's top business schools and its MBA program, I would be glad to share them with you.
Oh Please

Elmhurst, IL

#62 Jan 17, 2008
Brownsburg Citizen wrote:
Um.... American cars are not to blame. Ghetto location.
Now now, watch the name calling. I hear that Brownsburg is darkening by the day (much to their chagrin). LOL!!!
Watson Park

Carmel, IN

#63 Jan 17, 2008
Phred wrote:
I'm sorry Bud is going under, but I agree with other posters that at least part of the problem is his location, which, like it or not, is tainted by the surrounding neighborhood. The neighborhood has a distinctly "un-hip" image, sort of like Chevys themselves. With the exception of the outrageously expensive Corvette, the Chevy model line lacks distinction and -- at least to my mind -- has become a brand for older, blue-haired drivers or for lower-income drivers who have to settle for cheap, bland cars. That's not an image that attracts young, repeat buyers.
It's interesting to see different points of view. I think I would implode if I lived much further north or east of Bud Wolfe. To me, the areas outside of downtown -- Fall Creek Place, Fountain Square, Watson Park, Meridian Kessler, Butler -- are the hippest places to live in town.

Just curious, what part of Indy do you think is hip? Brownsburg? Fishers? Avon?

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