Bud Wolf Chevrolet will shut its doors

Hurt by the public's negative image of American cars, Bud Wolf Chevrolet will close its dealership at 5350 N. Keystone Ave. Full Story
Phred

Burbank, CA

#23 Jan 17, 2008
I'm sorry Bud is going under, but I agree with other posters that at least part of the problem is his location, which, like it or not, is tainted by the surrounding neighborhood. The neighborhood has a distinctly "un-hip" image, sort of like Chevys themselves. With the exception of the outrageously expensive Corvette, the Chevy model line lacks distinction and -- at least to my mind -- has become a brand for older, blue-haired drivers or for lower-income drivers who have to settle for cheap, bland cars. That's not an image that attracts young, repeat buyers.

Since: Nov 07

Greenwood, IN

#24 Jan 17, 2008
How did this thread go from an Indianapolis car dealership closing to complaining about unions? It takes brains and education to make that leap.

The common thread is finding someone and or something to blame. Atlas blamed the meat cutters, Bud Wolf Chevrolet blamed the publics view on American cars, and now unions are being blamed for the downfall of America.

Let's try blaming the leadership of these companies or our great nation. When Bethlehem Steel "diversified" it's holdings, the company lost it's backside, the CEO got outrageous bonuses, and the common worker was laid off while making an decent everyday wage.

Our leadership keeps raping our nation and our companies for outrageous sums of money while the everyday-Joe is trying to make a decent working living. Once everyone is laid off, who will buy the products American companies make and sell?
Prissy Jones

United States

#25 Jan 17, 2008
Sure. Why not? They sell cars at some supermarkets in Europe. If you have any trouble, or need warranty work, you just call the toll free number for help. If they can not solve it, they will direct you to the local service center and/or send a two truck and bring a rental, if needed. This concept saves land/space, time, overhead and is a much more efficient supply chain that actually rpovides better service.

Traditional car dealers are no longer needed. They should go the way of a '62 Chrysler with tailfins. Why shouldn't cars be purchased and serviced just like any other commidty?
Why not pick up a car at Waltmart, along with your new T.V and a bundle of carrots? Then maybe that Chinese car could be made out of recyclable material so it could just be discarded like an aluminum can after the end of its life.

The current car dealership system in America is a waste. The American auto industry still seems to be stuck in the 1950s-70s in oh so many ways. I guess one will always try to relive their glory days, regardless of how much failure and ridicule it will bring them in modern times.
CHM wrote:
Pretty soon we'll be buying all of our new cars at Walmart. They'll be made in China.
lafguy60

Thorntown, IN

#26 Jan 17, 2008
Could take up a lot of space to reply to this, but let me tell you, based on 35 plus years in association with the retail auto trade, that what works in the rest of the world won't work here. Many reasons with the major one being the American obsession with "instant gratification".
Prissy Jones wrote:
Sure. Why not? They sell cars at some supermarkets in Europe. If you have any trouble, or need warranty work, you just call the toll free number for help. If they can not solve it, they will direct you to the local service center and/or send a two truck and bring a rental, if needed. This concept saves land/space, time, overhead and is a much more efficient supply chain that actually rpovides better service.
Traditional car dealers are no longer needed. They should go the way of a '62 Chrysler with tailfins. Why shouldn't cars be purchased and serviced just like any other commidty?
Why not pick up a car at Waltmart, along with your new T.V and a bundle of carrots? Then maybe that Chinese car could be made out of recyclable material so it could just be discarded like an aluminum can after the end of its life.
The current car dealership system in America is a waste. The American auto industry still seems to be stuck in the 1950s-70s in oh so many ways. I guess one will always try to relive their glory days, regardless of how much failure and ridicule it will bring them in modern times.
<quoted text>
lock

Evansville, IN

#27 Jan 17, 2008
Luke wrote:
The unions have ruined this country.Its no wonder that so many companies have moved overseas.If it is union made,do not buy it.
What a complete Idiot! I have been warned that this is offensive, what about the complete untruth about Unions and the part that they have played in the prosperity of the last 100 years. You will find out once they are gone and you are making 1 dollar a day as your great grandfather did. Do some research and find out what the Labor Movement has really done for this country.
Mr Obvious

Indianapolis, IN

#28 Jan 17, 2008
I hesitated reading the commentary at first as I have difficulty in pronouncing my dissatifaction with the UAW as in some circles can be misconstrued as anti-american. I am relieved to see that most people realize that funding the salaries and pensions of our Union Auto Workers will be the definitive demise of the big three. Most people agree but fail to follow the path of how it will eventually affect them, as in a Vacant lot on North Keystone with friends and neighbors out of work.
There will be those that argue the UAW should not shoulder 100% of the blame, I completely agree... but the greatest majority of the blame is undeniable.
Prissy Jones

United States

#29 Jan 17, 2008
What could be more instantly gratifying than picking up your new car while you are grocery shopping? Then having it picked up and a rental car brought directly to your door, if there are any problems?

This is sure a lot more instantly gratifying than going to a traditional car dealership with only one brand, having to barter and wait while your car is being "prepared." Then if there are problems you have to find a way to get the car back to the dealershi where you are roped in to dealing witha single service representative.

It sounds like you are mainly interested in self-preservation, since your answer is illogical anc contradictory to conventional wisdom.


lafguy60 wrote:
Could take up a lot of space to reply to this, but let me tell you, based on 35 plus years in association with the retail auto trade, that what works in the rest of the world won't work here. Many reasons with the major one being the American obsession with "instant gratification".
<quoted text>
lock

Evansville, IN

#30 Jan 17, 2008
Luke wrote:
The unions have ruined this country.Its no wonder that so many companies have moved overseas.If it is union made,do not buy it.
Companies are not moving because of unions, their moving because of greed. Just because a man wants to make a fair wage for a fair days work is not the problem. It's the greed of the manufacturers, who want ever in creasing profits, therefore gaining ever increasing bonuses and stock options.
The record speaks for it's self. Cheap labor and no concern for the environment are the main concerns of "Big Business", with out regard for the people that they employee or poison. Let's go back to the days of Rockefeller, Carnegie, and the other barons of business, so that they can exploit the masses for their own greed!
Hancock County Native

Indianapolis, IN

#31 Jan 17, 2008
Its not that driving an American car isn't considered "cool" Mr. Wolf. Its the fact that American cars are over-priced, not durable and not fuel-efficent. People want the most for their money and when they buy a car they expect it to last past its warranty and not burn gas like its free.
KrannertMBA08

United States

#32 Jan 17, 2008
I have to hand it to just about everyone on this message board. When I'm in the mood for a good laugh, I love reading the "logic" some of you post with regards to stories the Star posts.

A couple of things regarding Bud Wolf. First, although Wolf threw a blanket statement to the press stating that property taxes caused his decline, there is some truth to his comment. What can you do with an after-tax dollar? Spend or save. When the tax burden on your income is larger, with no increase in that income, spending or saving naturally decreases. Basic macro economics. Those fewer after-tax dollars will go towards necessities, i.e. groceries, clothing, utilities, etc., leaving fewer dollars for "wants".

Now, with that out of the way, one must look at the auto dealership "industry", especially with regards to American dealerships. Do a quick comparison people...how many Chevrolet dealers are there in the Indy metro area? Penske, Estes, Blossom, Pedigo, Hare, Watson, Hubler, Andy Mohr, and Wolf. This doesn't take into account those in other surrounding counties. Compare with Toyota; Beck, Tom Wood, O'Brien, and Butler. Wolf's demise involved competition among Chevrolet dealers. Hell, it involved competition with other GM dealers, like Saturn and Pontiac. This has always been a problem with GM; badge engineering (think Saturn Aura, Pontiac G6, Chevrolet Malibu; all the same platform)causes consumers who are smart to pit dealers against each other for the same vehicle.

American car quality may play some role, but it is not the sole reason. Read any reputable third party report (JD Power, Consumer Reports, Edmunds, etc.) and you will see that American cars are closing the gap, if not surpassing in some cases, the quality of the perceived leaders in the industry. The problem with GM is reversing the perception of an entire generation of buyers that was turned away from the company from issues dating back to the early '80's.

Finally, I agree that unions have most likely run their course in this country. However, don't make the blanket statement that these people are stupid. The UAW is a perfect example of a population where 1% of that population give the other 99% a bad name.

Now, I will sit back and read the posts of people blaming Mitch Daniels, Ben Bernanke, the Chinese, Wal-Mart, Ron Artest, George Bush, the New England Patriots, and God for causing the demise of Bud Wolf Chevrolet.
lastrep

Indianapolis, IN

#33 Jan 17, 2008
lock wrote:
<quoted text>
Companies are not moving because of unions, their moving because of greed. Just because a man wants to make a fair wage for a fair days work is not the problem. It's the greed of the manufacturers, who want ever in creasing profits, therefore gaining ever increasing bonuses and stock options.
The record speaks for it's self. Cheap labor and no concern for the environment are the main concerns of "Big Business", with out regard for the people that they employee or poison. Let's go back to the days of Rockefeller, Carnegie, and the other barons of business, so that they can exploit the masses for their own greed!
How about unuions going on strike for more money, more benefits, and job security even when the company is not making a profit. Wouldn't you say that is also greed?
Prissy Jones

United States

#34 Jan 17, 2008
Well, I have always had really bad luck with American cars and I have been hearing the "closing the gap" argument for the last 20 years or so. It that ole' just never seems to be "closed" because the foreign companies are still improving qauality and efficiency at a fster rate tha the Americans.

KrannertMBA08 wrote:
I have to hand it to just about everyone on this message board. When I'm in the mood for a good laugh, I love reading the "logic" some of you post with regards to stories the Star posts.
A couple of things regarding Bud Wolf. First, although Wolf threw a blanket statement to the press stating that property taxes caused his decline, there is some truth to his comment. What can you do with an after-tax dollar? Spend or save. When the tax burden on your income is larger, with no increase in that income, spending or saving naturally decreases. Basic macro economics. Those fewer after-tax dollars will go towards necessities, i.e. groceries, clothing, utilities, etc., leaving fewer dollars for "wants".
Now, with that out of the way, one must look at the auto dealership "industry", especially with regards to American dealerships. Do a quick comparison people...how many Chevrolet dealers are there in the Indy metro area? Penske, Estes, Blossom, Pedigo, Hare, Watson, Hubler, Andy Mohr, and Wolf. This doesn't take into account those in other surrounding counties. Compare with Toyota; Beck, Tom Wood, O'Brien, and Butler. Wolf's demise involved competition among Chevrolet dealers. Hell, it involved competition with other GM dealers, like Saturn and Pontiac. This has always been a problem with GM; badge engineering (think Saturn Aura, Pontiac G6, Chevrolet Malibu; all the same platform)causes consumers who are smart to pit dealers against each other for the same vehicle.
American car quality may play some role, but it is not the sole reason. Read any reputable third party report (JD Power, Consumer Reports, Edmunds, etc.) and you will see that American cars are closing the gap, if not surpassing in some cases, the quality of the perceived leaders in the industry. The problem with GM is reversing the perception of an entire generation of buyers that was turned away from the company from issues dating back to the early '80's.
Finally, I agree that unions have most likely run their course in this country. However, don't make the blanket statement that these people are stupid. The UAW is a perfect example of a population where 1% of that population give the other 99% a bad name.
Now, I will sit back and read the posts of people blaming Mitch Daniels, Ben Bernanke, the Chinese, Wal-Mart, Ron Artest, George Bush, the New England Patriots, and God for causing the demise of Bud Wolf Chevrolet.
lafguy60

Indianapolis, IN

#35 Jan 17, 2008
The distribution system in place in Europe and other parts of the world rely on placing an order for a vehicle and then waiting days, if you are lucky, weeks and perhaps months for it to arrive. While you may be placing the order at the grocery store, you will not be getting your new vehicle immediately. The other issue is that land is at a premium in Europe so having regional service centers makes sense. In the US, where there is an abundence of land, this system was piloted and tested and failed miserably with the American public. Also, in most other parts of the world trade-ins are strongly discouraged, so you have to find a way to dispose of your current vehicle. And, in pricing there is no negotiation - you pay the same price for the same vehicle at every outlet. Survey after survey tells the industry that people dislike the negotiation process yet the consumer is the one that will start the negotiation process the majority of the time. One price has been tried numerous times only to fail each time, due to customer resistance and desire to negotiate. I have no connection or income from the automotive industry, so self-preservation is the last thing I need to worry about in my postings.
Prissy Jones wrote:
What could be more instantly gratifying than picking up your new car while you are grocery shopping? Then having it picked up and a rental car brought directly to your door, if there are any problems?
This is sure a lot more instantly gratifying than going to a traditional car dealership with only one brand, having to barter and wait while your car is being "prepared." Then if there are problems you have to find a way to get the car back to the dealershi where you are roped in to dealing witha single service representative.
It sounds like you are mainly interested in self-preservation, since your answer is illogical anc contradictory to conventional wisdom.
<quoted text>
Prissy Jones

United States

#36 Jan 17, 2008
Some good points there. And our system and abundance of land leads to partially abandoned, crime ridden, low end commercial strips like along N. Keystone & W. Eashington St. Society is definately paying a "price" for this kind of system.

gotta love it.:+(
lafguy60 wrote:
The distribution system in place in Europe and other parts of the world rely on placing an order for a vehicle and then waiting days, if you are lucky, weeks and perhaps months for it to arrive. While you may be placing the order at the grocery store, you will not be getting your new vehicle immediately. The other issue is that land is at a premium in Europe so having regional service centers makes sense. In the US, where there is an abundence of land, this system was piloted and tested and failed miserably with the American public. Also, in most other parts of the world trade-ins are strongly discouraged, so you have to find a way to dispose of your current vehicle. And, in pricing there is no negotiation - you pay the same price for the same vehicle at every outlet. Survey after survey tells the industry that people dislike the negotiation process yet the consumer is the one that will start the negotiation process the majority of the time. One price has been tried numerous times only to fail each time, due to customer resistance and desire to negotiate. I have no connection or income from the automotive industry, so self-preservation is the last thing I need to worry about in my postings.
<quoted text>
Belinda

Indianapolis, IN

#37 Jan 17, 2008
I bought a Chevy Malibu from Bud Wolf in 2004, and it was quite troublesome. I'm not going to slam all American cars, like some, but I will say that I'll probably not buy another Chevy. I don't Bud Wolf though. It was just a badly made, cheap car.
American

Indianapolis, IN

#38 Jan 17, 2008
Overall, I think it's a shame to see this closing. I do hope American products make a comeback. I try hard to buy American and it's difficult.
lafguy60

Indianapolis, IN

#39 Jan 17, 2008
Prissy Jones wrote:
Well, I have always had really bad luck with American cars and I have been hearing the "closing the gap" argument for the last 20 years or so. It that ole' just never seems to be "closed" because the foreign companies are still improving qauality and efficiency at a fster rate tha the Americans.
<quoted text>
The interesting thing about the quality debate is that the negative press is decidely tilted toward the domestic manufacturers. The chairman of Toyota has ackowledged the quality issues that they have, yet very little press is given to the issue. As far as efficency is concerned the best automotive plants in terms of efficiency are located in North America. some of them run by domestic manufacturers and others by transplants. I will acknowlege that during the 70's and 80's the domestic automobile manufacturers built a lot of junk. That started to change in the 90's and today the actual quality gap has narrowed dramatically.
Rusty Crank

Indianapolis, IN

#40 Jan 17, 2008
American wrote:
Overall, I think it's a shame to see this closing. I do hope American products make a comeback. I try hard to buy American and it's difficult.
No, it's not difficult. You just pay way too much money then try not to break it before you get home. That's the secret.
Zippy

San Francisco, CA

#42 Jan 17, 2008
KrannertMBA08 wrote:
I have to hand it to just about everyone on this message board. When I'm in the mood for a good laugh, I love reading the "logic" some of you post with regards to stories the Star posts.
A couple of things regarding Bud Wolf. First, although Wolf threw a blanket statement to the press stating that property taxes caused his decline, there is some truth to his comment. What can you do with an after-tax dollar? Spend or save. When the tax burden on your income is larger, with no increase in that income, spending or saving naturally decreases. Basic macro economics. Those fewer after-tax dollars will go towards necessities, i.e. groceries, clothing, utilities, etc., leaving fewer dollars for "wants".
Now, with that out of the way, one must look at the auto dealership "industry", especially with regards to American dealerships. Do a quick comparison people...how many Chevrolet dealers are there in the Indy metro area? Penske, Estes, Blossom, Pedigo, Hare, Watson, Hubler, Andy Mohr, and Wolf. This doesn't take into account those in other surrounding counties. Compare with Toyota; Beck, Tom Wood, O'Brien, and Butler. Wolf's demise involved competition among Chevrolet dealers. Hell, it involved competition with other GM dealers, like Saturn and Pontiac. This has always been a problem with GM; badge engineering (think Saturn Aura, Pontiac G6, Chevrolet Malibu; all the same platform)causes consumers who are smart to pit dealers against each other for the same vehicle.
American car quality may play some role, but it is not the sole reason. Read any reputable third party report (JD Power, Consumer Reports, Edmunds, etc.) and you will see that American cars are closing the gap, if not surpassing in some cases, the quality of the perceived leaders in the industry. The problem with GM is reversing the perception of an entire generation of buyers that was turned away from the company from issues dating back to the early '80's.
Finally, I agree that unions have most likely run their course in this country. However, don't make the blanket statement that these people are stupid. The UAW is a perfect example of a population where 1% of that population give the other 99% a bad name.
Now, I will sit back and read the posts of people blaming Mitch Daniels, Ben Bernanke, the Chinese, Wal-Mart, Ron Artest, George Bush, the New England Patriots, and God for causing the demise of Bud Wolf Chevrolet.
Great Post!! Buy ya a beer?!
KrannertMBA08

United States

#43 Jan 17, 2008
Zippy wrote:
<quoted text>
Great Post!! Buy ya a beer?!
Lol, name the time and place!

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