H & R Block payscale
Hiker

Scottsdale, AZ

#976 Aug 31, 2011
For the last couple of years first year employees have been paid a fixed hourly rate. So whatever hours they work they get paid. From the second year on you get paid a minimum hourly rate no matter how many hours you work. On the top of that you can earn more as your total pay is worked out based on the how many returns you do and what the fee is per return. If this total is less than the minimum pay you just get the minimum pay.
Tom

Rossville, GA

#977 Oct 4, 2011
I am a 75 year old retiree who works for Block. 2012 will be my 10th year.

I hope no one takes these remarks by most of the people on this site serious. They are either the
post of someone who did not study and apply themselves.

You can not start out in any part time job at the top of the ladder. You have to work your way up as I did. I am earning far more than any part time worker in any other field. Last year I grossed over 17,000 for 3 1/2 months work and that is far more than you can get anywhere else for part-time work.

I might add that I have more client than anyone else in my office. Most of the other professionals there have 20 to 26 years of service.

If you like to do taxes and want to make good money doing it then H&R is the best place to work.

I will tell all of you that are unhappy the same thing I used to tell all my employees: The door you came through asking for a job swings both ways.

H&R trains their workers better than any other tax company. H&R does not and I repeat does not hire workers to do taxes from temp services.
I will have over 130 hours of additional training when I complete all courses this year. We are required to complete 24 hours. If you do not complete and pass 24 hours of training H&R will not hire you the next season. This tells you that H&R wants tax professionals who desire to give their clients every tax benefit that they are legally entitled to.

See you in 2012 when it is time to do your taxes.
HR Block Losers

Glen Rock, NJ

#978 Oct 16, 2011
Tom wrote:
I am a 75 year old retiree who works for Block. 2012 will be my 10th year.
I hope no one takes these remarks by most of the people on this site serious. They are either the
post of someone who did not study and apply themselves.
You can not start out in any part time job at the top of the ladder. You have to work your way up as I did. I am earning far more than any part time worker in any other field. Last year I grossed over 17,000 for 3 1/2 months work and that is far more than you can get anywhere else for part-time work.
I might add that I have more client than anyone else in my office. Most of the other professionals there have 20 to 26 years of service.
If you like to do taxes and want to make good money doing it then H&R is the best place to work.
I will tell all of you that are unhappy the same thing I used to tell all my employees: The door you came through asking for a job swings both ways.
H&R trains their workers better than any other tax company. H&R does not and I repeat does not hire workers to do taxes from temp services.
I will have over 130 hours of additional training when I complete all courses this year. We are required to complete 24 hours. If you do not complete and pass 24 hours of training H&R will not hire you the next season. This tells you that H&R wants tax professionals who desire to give their clients every tax benefit that they are legally entitled to.
See you in 2012 when it is time to do your taxes.
You must be drinking the H&R Block Kool Aid! Every year the tax pros have to work harder just to keep up from the previous one. Most of the top notch preparers leave after a certain amount of years and start making real money with less effort. The ones I know earn about $100k with their own clients. Most data entry is now done by scanners, not the old school manual method.

If you think making $40K is a lot of money, then I will congratulate you and wish you the best of everything in your 20th year with H&R.
tax bubba

Waynesboro, VA

#979 Oct 17, 2011
OK, you took the basic tax course from H&R Block! That is a start, but good grief, do you really think you know all there is about preparing taxes?

Unless you realize HOW MUCH YOU DON'T KNOW about preparing taxes, you are a fool.

When I finished my first year preparing taxes and had completed 200 returns, I thought I was Mr Tax Pro Deluxe.

During the next summer I signed up for several advanced H&R Block tax courses and discovered that there was more to taxes than an occasional schedule A and the earned income credit.

I'm beginning my twelfth year now and study 50 to 60 hours during the summer to keep myself current.

The computer is smart, but you have to know how to use it. If you're going to be good at it you have to practice.

To make it work right, you need to know where the numbers you enter go on the tax return. You need to know which forms you need. You need to know where to get help. You need to know your primary sources, ie. instructions and publications. You need to know how to use Block's Tax Institute reference center. AND you need to know that you don't know all the answers!

Your ability to get the job done right means a lot to the poor sufferer who's going to pay you $200 for your work. You'd better be worth it!

Preparing taxes professionally means you think and act like a professional.

It's time to grow up!
HR Block Losers

Mission, KS

#980 Oct 17, 2011
tax bubba wrote:
Your ability to get the job done right means a lot to the poor sufferer who's going to pay you $200 for your work. You'd better be worth it!
Preparing taxes professionally means you think and act like a professional.
It's time to grow up!
Out of that $200, how much do you get from H&R Block? I assume we're talking a few dollars and cents.
HR Block Losers

New York, NY

#981 Oct 30, 2011
Tax Bubba - You are an idiot!

Clients don't pay $200 for your work, they pay the company directly and you get a cut of it, and it's not much. The entry level preparers get a few dollars and that's about it. I don't see the company paying more than 20% of that 200 for a seasoned tax preparer.
New Girl

United States

#982 Nov 2, 2011
I started taking the H & R Block beginning class in September. I paid $125 for the class and was told that we would meet three times a week, three hours per class. They didn't mention that we would also have 3 to 5 hours in homework for each one of those classes. There is no compensation for any of this. You must score and 80 or above throughout the class in order to have a job offered to you. We are over halfway through the course now and compensation has not been discussed. I'm really hoping this is all worth it.
Another New Girl

Fresno, CA

#983 Nov 3, 2011
I started my class in August. We have 2 weeks left. The District Manager came to speak at our class and said, last year we started first year tax preparers out at $9 an hour. No commission type payment first year.
I've read alot of the comments on this thread. Most of them negative. I have no illusions that working for H & R Block is going to make me millions I think if that's why you're getting into tax preparing you'll be disappointed. But so far, I love the class. I'm hoping to get hired. It's been worth not only the cost of the class, but all the homework too.
RogerG

Tulsa, OK

#984 Nov 8, 2011
New Girl wrote:
I started taking the H & R Block beginning class in September. I paid $125 for the class and was told that we would meet three times a week, three hours per class. They didn't mention that we would also have 3 to 5 hours in homework for each one of those classes. There is no compensation for any of this. You must score and 80 or above throughout the class in order to have a job offered to you. We are over halfway through the course now and compensation has not been discussed. I'm really hoping this is all worth it.
This will only be worth it if you end up liking to prepare taxes and want to make a career out of it. You won't make much money working at Block, however the training is excellent. They should tell you upfront (they won't) that you should spend several hours outside of class doing the homework and studying. It's the only way to get to the point that you don't feel overly stupid when you have a client sitting in front of you. Once you complete the basic class and have a year or two experience you'll feel a little more confident.

Take the class, work at Block 2 or 3 tax seasons and then move on to someplace that you can make some money.

Since: Oct 08

Bonita Springs, FL

#985 Nov 8, 2011
Let me suggest an alternative.
Apply at a CPA firm to help sort and scan documents. Most firms with several preparers (look at firms with 5+ preparers) hire an intern or two to help with these tasks. They may even let you do some simple returns near the end of the season. If so, you will get a shot at using advanced tax software. A season as a preparer at a CPA firm is equivalent to 3 years at Block as far as learning goes.
.
It helps, but is not absolutely required to have a college degree (any major) or some college. Express a strong desire to have a tax career and a willingness to learn.
You will learn about all the documents and if they like you will have a prep job the next year with far more extensive training than Block. You will see documents you canít even imagine. Donít underestimate the learning value of working with the advanced documents.
.
Many CPAs look down on Block (but not their training). You can say,ďI can work at H&R Block, but I think I would learn so much more at your firm. Iím a fast learner and I think H&R Block will be unable to offer me the challenge Iím looking for.Ē
They should pay $12 to $15 per hour depending on your area of the country.
.
At least you will have CPA firm experience on your resume and can return to H&R Block as a second year preparer.
.
An additional plus is you will get to work far more hours, especially the last 6-8 weeks of the season.
.
Block will kick you out of the course if they know you are looking for work at a competitor. You can wait until youíve finished the course. Itís up to you.
HR Block Losers

Mission, KS

#986 Nov 9, 2011
Zip2001 wrote:
You will learn about all the documents and if they like you will have a prep job the next year with far more extensive training than Block. You will see documents you canít even imagine. Donít underestimate the learning value of working with the advanced documents.
.
Many CPAs look down on Block (but not their training). You can say,ďI can work at H&R Block, but I think I would learn so much more at your firm. Iím a fast learner and I think H&R Block will be unable to offer me the challenge Iím looking for.Ē
They should pay $12 to $15 per hour depending on your area of the country.
.
At least you will have CPA firm experience on your resume and can return to H&R Block as a second year preparer.
.
An additional plus is you will get to work far more hours, especially the last 6-8 weeks of the season.
.
Block will kick you out of the course if they know you are looking for work at a competitor. You can wait until youíve finished the course. Itís up to you.
There isn't really much to learn on the personal/individual side of things. The documents you see at a CPA firm are the same with what you see at Block. Now if you are telling people to look at business documents, then that's a different matter altogether. This is where you get to understand how businesses work and how they are related to taxes.

Although I hate Block as much as possible, you get to learn client business relationship skills, something you CANNOT learn in a CPA firm. You could be a superstar tax preparer, but if your verbal ability and interpersonal skills are poor, expect to generate less money. Unless you are dealing with a very high end clientele, and many people do not.

Another thing, many losers end up working for Block because it's a pretty much low stress job, and at the end of the season, you get to collect unemployment benefits for a year, equivalent to about a $15 hour/40hr per week. You can't beat that with a seasonal position at a CPA firm.
another new person

Visalia, CA

#987 Nov 11, 2011
I started in August 2011 and have 3 more sessions to finish. I am shocked at the amount of homework. I too hope this is all worth it because no one with H&R is willing to talk about compensation. We had to sign a paper saying we weren;'t going to work for someone lese, I wonder if that counts for working for yourself?
New Girl wrote:
I started taking the H & R Block beginning class in September. I paid $125 for the class and was told that we would meet three times a week, three hours per class. They didn't mention that we would also have 3 to 5 hours in homework for each one of those classes. There is no compensation for any of this. You must score and 80 or above throughout the class in order to have a job offered to you. We are over halfway through the course now and compensation has not been discussed. I'm really hoping this is all worth it.
another new person

Visalia, CA

#988 Nov 11, 2011
oh yeah, we had to pay $299.00 not $125.00, but it is 28 sessions

Since: Nov 09

Location hidden

#989 Nov 12, 2011
2 years ago the cost was $200 and there were fewer sessions.
1. You will not be able to purchase any other kind of tax or accounting or any training at that low rate. As a CPA, I know other companies charge $200-$1000 for one 8 hour session.
2. stop complaining about the homework, again, you would never be able to purchase this kind of training at such a low rate and you won't learn anything if you don't do the homework. Our tax code is stupidly complex and you have to do the homework to understand the concepts.
3. correct, no one talks about compensation because there is no promise to hire you. Pass the exam, come to class, do your homework and the instructor will pass on that info to the hiring people. The past 2 years first years started at $8.50 an hour. I heard $9.00 this year. Don't expect anything more. last year as a 2nd year I was at $9, but I ended up at $12.50 with the compensation. This year, since I had a good last year my 80% rate is $10. No, you won't get rich doing this. But I have had 2 "real" accounting firms ask me about coming to work for them during the tax season, knowing I have the H&R experience. But I don't want to work 80 hours a week during tax season.
RogerG

Sapulpa, OK

#990 Nov 13, 2011
HR Block Losers and Retired CPA are both spot on with their advice. Block's training is excellent. If you value your time and don't want to work 60 hour weeks at another place - work for Block a couple years and set your own hours. If money and a career-track in tax is important then maybe Zip2001 alternative is the way you want to go.
OneWhoWorkedAtHR

Toronto, Canada

#991 Nov 30, 2011
I worked at HR,

Let me tell you something everyone is different. When someone who just wants to get their current year tax filed on time, a level one tax associate can do it easily. My beef is that the temp people do not have anything to give to the people describing their situation. Getting your taxes done is a lot like going to the doctors, you got to get the right doctor to treat your pains. If only the structure of H&R block was more refined.

H&R can stand for hustle and run, because most of the time its pretty much that. Its equivalent to McDonald's fast food chains.

To be honest and right on the ball in the end of the day its not always about the name H&R block or Liberty Tax its the name of the person you go to to get your taxes done. Heck, I bet anyone a million dollars you go to a franchise tax service center find someone who has 10 years of experience in that center and tell me that guy is proud to work there and thinks that the people being hired are qualified to work here. If those two points are true YOU WIN.
Dianee T

Gonzales, LA

#992 Dec 17, 2011
I have worked for H&R Block for 10 years and I find this past year was a ripoff for seasoned tax preparers with experience. H&R block was giving away free 1040ez's and typing experenced preparers up with free second looks, which 98% of the time you don't get paid for.The H&R Bank is making money off of tax preparers as it requires us to take a BANK AGENCY course in order to process emerald advance cards which we don't make any money off of but H&R BANK does.I find they keep thinking of ways to make money off of their preparers, without paying us a Decent salary. We are required to be certified every year by taking 24 hours of tax courses and all kind of updates and skills for success classes and stupid dress rehearsal classes. Is their no end to the GREED of H&R block CEO's? They must all been trained by Barney Madoff! H&R Block needs to give a honest pay to a hard working,experienced underpaid tax preparer. Don't waste your time taking all the classes H&R block requires because you will never be compensated for it! Wise up H&R Block and treat your employees fairly!!!
Diego Norrea

Brooklyn, NY

#993 Dec 23, 2011
If you want to make $$$ in H&R Block you got to stick for the long run.
banshee

Belmar, NJ

#994 Dec 28, 2011
I was recently hired as a first-year tax associate at Block, and was looking forward to working there despite the low salary and no bonus. This morning, two weeks before I was supposed to start, I got a call from an office leader who said I had been reassigned to her office, which had not even been one of my choices, and which was in a very dangerous neighborhood. And I was scheduled for night hours! I am so disappointed. But this was not the first time Block has tried to do this to me.
Block wants US to be professionals but they treat us like pieces of meat. I've worked in public accounting and I know what it feels like to be treated like a professional.
banshee

Belmar, NJ

#995 Dec 28, 2011
RogerG wrote:
<quoted text>
No, you won't make a "commission" your first year. As far as I know FYTP are hourly only. It should be spelled out in your contract.
The fastest way to move up the compensation ladder is to pass the CPA exam or the EA exam. If you can do that, all you have to do is take a few CBTs (easy) and you'll be moved to Master Tax Advisor (highest compensation level). Otherwise, you move one level at a time.
Really? I am a new CPA who was offered a job at Block, but no one ever told me that. I was offered the standard Year 1 rate.

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