H & R Block payscale
Tiredofdemagogue s

Corona, CA

#63 Jul 13, 2007
I think that you should watch your mouth with the hateful and racist comments that spew out of it and end up on the internet("Jew Joints"). Your stupidity influences others who practice hate and that is unacceptable, ignorant, and irresponisble. that is unfortunate that a company only wants to pay you minimum wage, but you should ask about financial compensation before you commit your precious time to something. If you don't have the good sense to ask about your salary, then you will get taken advantage of. You need to start looking out for yourself and quit writing rude and racist comments.
Henriette

United States

#64 Jul 14, 2007
retired and looking wrote:
so is it possible not to get hired at Block after taking the course and then go to temp agency and get hired and work at Block for more money.??
You bet it is !!!
Ohio Preparer

AOL

#65 Jul 18, 2007
I was a first season Tax Preparer of H & R Block, my main reason was to get experience to interact with people. The salary was not my incentive $8.00, you can't spend that in too many places. But, the tax preparation and certification is priceless. Adding that to my resume, told potential employers that I took the time and effort to complete such a stainous course.

The point is ladies and gents, everyone took the courses for different reasons, advancement, 2nd job, experience or just wanting to do their own taxes.

Any job is what you make of it, you can either stay or don't stay. There are other tax companies that pay more for you just completing H & R Block courses, some even send you through H & R Block and after completion you work for them(Interesting Right), and pays more. So, everyone have choices. You have the ability to have the course work for you. So take advantage of that training. And, as someone else said, you can always start your own company and be your own boss. Good Luck!
not rich

United States

#66 Jul 20, 2007
I'm glad you can work for no money. It must be nice.

IMHO, volunteer work is volunteer work right from the start. Work-for-benefit IS work for benefit right from the start. Volunteer work posing as work-for-benefit is a scam.
Curious

Philadelphia, PA

#67 Jul 23, 2007
Can someone tell me about their experience actually getting a part-time/evening job with H&R Block? I'm a non-practicing lawyer who wants to supplement his business with tax work in the evening, but it's been a long time since I took my basic tax course and the laws have changed considerably. I'm thinking that time spent in the H&R Block training program -- and then some time actually preparing returns for them -- will update my knowledge and skills adequately enough to begin growing my business in years 3 and 4, while tossing a few extra bucks my way in the meantimes. Anyone have any thoughts on this?
the news

United States

#68 Jul 24, 2007
The news just out starting July 2007 is that the workers who have only completed working through one tax season with H & R Block cannot take advantage of any extra, developmental classes given by Block. A worker must have completed working two seasons to qualify for additional classes. Therefore, a worker cannot advance in pay because they cannot gain greater knowledge. It is my understanding that classes at other outside colleges and such do not count toward increased pay, only the Block classes count.
In our area,the first tax season consisted mainly of rush week, which is the peak period: last week of January and the first week of February. When I was hired, I worked up until February 13th and didn't get any clients who were interesting and challenging. Mostly, I administered/sold refund anticipation loans to earned income credit people...people who really couldn't afford the high rate of interest that they were being charged.
There also is an employment agreement/contract to sign upon hiring. You MUST sign or not get hired. It is a covenant to not compete. The 2006-2007 season had a two-year covenant. "Associate covenants that for two (2) years following the cessation of Associate's employment hereunder for any reason (the "Restricted Period"), Associate shall not, directly or indirectly:
(1) Provide any of the following services to any Company Client:(i) preparation of tax returns; (ii) electronic filing of file tax returns; or (II) any Alternative Products or Services; or
(2) Solicit Company Clients for the purpose of offering to such clients:(I) tax return preparation services; (ii) electronic filing of tax returns; or (iii) any Alternative Products or Services." If you want more direct quote
I can give that to you. You must understand this is OLD information now. All may have since changed. It is my understanding things change every single year at Block. The rules and procedures have grown increasingly anti-worker. The good, old days are gone for good. Workers who have invested 10 years or so may still wish to continue employment, but those that have, in our area, are disgruntled by all the anti-worker conditions. They weren't pleasant to work with.
There are other ways to learn taxes as I have found.
the news

United States

#69 Jul 24, 2007
Curious wrote:
I'm a non-practicing lawyer who wants to supplement his business with tax work in the evening, but it's been a long time since I took my basic tax course and the laws have changed considerably.
Dear Curious:
Maybe your area of law is Labor Law. Maybe you could consult on a new union: The American Union of Accounting and Tax Preparers. I've been thinking about this union thing for a time now. Instead of crying how I was duped, I could promote a positive force in our country. A union would be a social benefit to millions of people...not just workers, but also clients...and also the US country as a whole.
Believe this, regular people are having so much difficulty filling out their own taxes that they are almost forced to go to a paid tax preparer. Unfortunately, that extreme need is an open door to being taken advantage of, not always, but too much to be moral. Our congress was (in Nov 2006) scolding tax preparer companies, like H & R Block, to truly have Free File, if they were going to be in the Free File Alliance. Copngress is frustrated with the developments taking place in the market. And with the IRS and state-level push to be totally digital, more citizens than ever before just can't do their own anymore. The resulting work load is so great that each and every year, our taxes and accompaning personal information are being, in greater and greater numbers, shipped (electronically transfered) to (especially) India.(Wasn't that bomber in England originally from India?) US tax preparer companies are hiring middle-men companies--like temp agencies-- who have tapped into a dirt, cheap, and desparate, foreign labor pool. The foreign workers there are taking classes RIGHT NOW on how to prepare US tax returns. They will be earning about $2/day, also, which is what I earned my first season with H & R Block, taking into account that I couldn't work any other job in my knowledge area, otherwise I'd be in conflict with the forced employment agreement. I had to be available 40-hours per week for Block, even if I was not scheduled...so I divided my wages by the 40-hour weeks between the end of November (date of hire) to Feb 13th. It was $2 per day gross, not less expenses for travel to other cities for product instruction, initial tuition fees, SS and income taxes, and hours and hours of homework reading and studying. I have no doubt that should I have desired to stay employed by them, with each increase in pay, I'd be cut that much in scheduled work hours. I saw that happening where I was positioned. The greater number of scheduled work hours were given to the newest hires, while the longer the employment, meant less scheduled work hours.

I look at the medical profession in this country and see that because none are unionized, they are at the mercy of huge, health care conglomerates. Physicians are crying now because their incomes are being swiped away by these influences into their market area. It's like Hitler just moved in on them. Who is suffering? Everyone except the conglomerate corporate heads...even the stock holders! If the medical profession were to unionize, they would see marked improvement to conditions.
Accountants are the same way! A union could regulate just how much overseas competion their employers get into. The American workforce would see higher salaries fitting of all the knowledge needed to function in this area.
You are from PA, it says. What do you think about getting involved with a national union?
Ciskaboom

AOL

#70 Jul 26, 2007
I am starting to study for the new season. It doesn't matter how many classes you take, your income is based on how many clients you do. I learned this last year when I took 120 credit hours in hope of a raise. I drove all over the place and got lost in some really bad neighborhoods. This year they are offering more on line. You do get so much more per return the more classes you take but unless you have that volume of clients, it isn't worth much. Then if you do get a raise, since your salary goes against your bonus you make less of a bonus so you are always making the same, unless by some miracle you can pull in more clients. I am studying just in case, but if I can get a really good day job I won't be back. You only get paid for orientation classes so all my studying is unpaid. You have to pay $20 a year for classes. They make it sound like they are doing you a favor. Had I known last year I would have paid to go back to school for 120 hours so I could make more money in a day job. Hopefully some real employer will be impressed with all these classes I took. If you want to make a few extra bucks, that is what you will get...very few.
LOL

Rochester, MN

#71 Aug 3, 2007
I think H and R Blockie is the same idiot as Blockie...dumb idiot
The Real Deal

AOL

#72 Aug 10, 2007
Wow. What a plethora of misinformation! Here is the real deal.
No, you're not going to get rich in your 1st or 2nd season at Block. Think of baseball. Do minor leaguers make the same as major leaguers? You do NOT get paid a salary – you work on commission. You receive a draw against your commission that is stated as an hourly rate. Whether your “hourly” is high or low it is ALL YOUR COMMISSION. That is why the money you are paid is subtracted from your total commission. H&R block is paying you some (or all, if you don’t make an effort to build up your own clientele) of your commission upfront, in good faith. If you turn out to be a poor, unmotivated tax professional and don’t earn more commission that the “hourly” stipend you are paid - then you win and THEY lose. You win because you don’t have to give back the money even though you didn't generate any income for yourself or the company. They lose because your spot could have been filled by someone with enough sense, intelligence and motivation to MAKE money for both themselves and the company. Not to mention that they invested just as much time and a heck of a lot more money in training you than you did in taking the classes. It takes time to build up a client base and make more money. New doctors spend a fortune on their education and still have to spend time building up a practice.
After your 1st year you are allowed to take more advanced classes–as many as you want for $20. Not per class-$20 TOTAL. You just can’t take on-line classes. Block feels that after only one season and one basic class you need to be in a classroom with an instructor so you get extra guidance and can ask questions about things you don’t understand. Makes sense to me. I would not want a doctor to remove my appendix if he learned how online...I wouldn’t want anyone handling my taxes that had only learned online either.
Your compensation does go up if you take classes. There are limits. If you take 120 hours of class just how well did you learn the subjects? They would rather you take less hours and actually learn something, so the limits are designed to control those who just go to class and get the "hours" not the knowledge.
As for computer training, this was an issue. There is only so much time to teach tax theory before tax season and sometimes computer training wasn't covered well. BUT tax pros made suggestions and Block listened to their employees! Now the basic tax course includes computer training and other skills as well as tax theory. You still learn forms and paper prep as well. This is an ADVANTAGE!(any high school student can do data entry-if you don’t know the forms you do NOT understand tax prep) Students have to sign a competitor exclusion agreement. That's because other firms realized that there is no better training and they sent their employees to H&R block classes! It does'nt make a lot of sense to spend resources training your competition.
Yes, there is medical available but you have to pay for it. The advantage is the coverage continues even “off season”. There is a 401K – you have to work enough hours per year to qualify for matching.
If you have the background and education you can take a test to see if you qualify to be hired without taking the class. I can tell you if you are a CPA with no hands on experience and only a few seminars under your belt, then it will be rough.
Are there tax pros in offices that are not friendly to new tax pros? Yes, but please excuse them–they've had to work with idiots like “blockie” who come for one year take up space and accomplish nothing. If you show them you are serious about your job they will warm up and come around. This is my ninth year with H&R Block and I love my job, the people I work with, not just the 10 in my office but the 300 in my district and almost everyone I have met from across the country. Is it worth it? It is what you make of it-stick it out you will be amazed at what it will make of you!
HR vs Jackson Hewitt

Twinsburg, OH

#73 Aug 13, 2007
I want to thank The Real Deal for the information. It was suggested to me to take the JH course, but I was already leaning toward HR. HR has done my taxes in the past and I was pleased. I also got my taxes done by Liberty Tax Prep and they all were HR trained. So I believe your comment about other companies sending thier employees to HR. I will follow my gut and go to HR.
I also like the comment on the league wages. I cant understand how people can be so impatient. Proving yourself does take time. NOBODY should be in a place working if it is not enjoyable. There are plenty of areas of work, find your knitch and work it. You don't have to put something down because it didn't work for you. That may not be your place even if you want it badly, that may not be the plan for you.
Oh FYI, name calling is very junior high school.
Ciskaboom

AOL

#74 Aug 14, 2007
I don't like the implication that I just took 120 hours without learning anything. I worked hard and studied hard and as you should know, H&R requires you to get an 80% to pass most courses. I did that and more, scoring higher than many pros that were with H&R for years. It is to their advantage to educate their workers and many companies pay to educate their workers, not make them pay. A lot of companies pay hourly for employees to be at a job when it is not busy, they don't call it a commission. I went to bad neighborhoods and commuted many miles only to learn that class was cancelled but no one called. I also work very hard during the year, coming in when people just don't show up and when the lazy ones refuse to take a client because they just want the hourly wage or a client is nasty. Sure I may get more clients if I hand out my card and coupons on street corners like they want me to, but my safety is priority. I would never steal other people's clients like some people too. If anyone wants to go for it, good luck. Just be informed that the only one making all the money in our office is the manager, no matter how long they have been there and the only way to make money is to get more and more clients every year.
contn4u

Largo, FL

#75 Aug 16, 2007
Netta wrote:
Wow! The broad range of experiences with the Block is amazing to me. I missed the class signup the first year and wound up working as a receptionist in a VERY slow office. I only worked about 5 or 6 days in a 3 week period. It was pretty sad, but the great part came later. I got my taxes done for free and I only had to pay $20 for the class. Already, I had gained more than I bargained for. This was definitely a plus.
Yes, the basic class was extremely long, but I enjoyed it. I had a good instructor and the material was interesting to me. Its all about the way you look at things. I can tell from the posts that there are some very pessimistic people out there who don't look forward to much and see the bad in everything. Of course, that's my assumption!
My first year as at tax pro went fairly well. I chose a much better office, thanks to my instructor, than the one I was a receptionist in. I only worked part time nights and weekends so I didn't have very many customers. Usually, by the time I got there in the evening, no one else came in and the weekends weren't much better. However, I still did several returns and learned a lot from those that I did and helped others to do. The old-timers in my office didn't mind helping the newbies and we all got along just fine. Once again, its all about attitude.
I will be taking courses this year and I will be returning to the Block next season. Yes, I hope to make more money this year. I didn't get a bonus, but from the looks of my statement I could have if I'd done a few more returns. So, guess what? I'll make sure to give out my business card and try to pull in a few more folks next year!
By the way, I'm a Financial Analyst the rest of the time, so the pay is no where near what I currently make. I'm not so much doing it for the money as the experience. I'm doing something that I really like to do and I get to meet lots of interesting people along the way, so the experience is what I look forward to most. If you're not that type of person, then you probably would be wasting your time.
You have the same out look that I do. It was to either pay my college $507 for an internship or take something that was more or less handed to me. So I signed up for the H & R Block class and could not be happier. Thanks!
contn4u

Largo, FL

#76 Aug 16, 2007
Ciskaboom wrote:
I am starting to study for the new season. It doesn't matter how many classes you take, your income is based on how many clients you do. I learned this last year when I took 120 credit hours in hope of a raise. I drove all over the place and got lost in some really bad neighborhoods. This year they are offering more on line. You do get so much more per return the more classes you take but unless you have that volume of clients, it isn't worth much. Then if you do get a raise, since your salary goes against your bonus you make less of a bonus so you are always making the same, unless by some miracle you can pull in more clients. I am studying just in case, but if I can get a really good day job I won't be back. You only get paid for orientation classes so all my studying is unpaid. You have to pay $20 a year for classes. They make it sound like they are doing you a favor. Had I known last year I would have paid to go back to school for 120 hours so I could make more money in a day job. Hopefully some real employer will be impressed with all these classes I took. If you want to make a few extra bucks, that is what you will get...very few.
Thank you!
wondering why

San Jose, CA

#77 Aug 19, 2007
It has been a months since we received our final paychecks for the 2007 tax season. The final compensation was figured by both the old method (the National Plan) and the new method (the IP Plan), but the total volume amount differed on which the calculations were made. As of the exit interview, we were told that this discrepancy would be looked into, but we yet to hear anything. My calculations of total volume for the season match the amount on the IP plan. The amount of volume on the “National Plan” is $2345 less, and that was the plan on which I received my bonus. At 30% pay, that amounts to over $700. I feel that an explanation or adjusted payment is overdue.
I mailed this concern to H&R Block headquarters, attention accounting a few months ago, and e-mailed it to a My Block site in the last month, and have yet to receive a reply.
Still wondering.
class starts next week

New York, NY

#78 Sep 7, 2007
I will be taking the HRB basic tax class beginning next week. I already have a well paying full-time job, and am more interested in doing taxes on the side on my own rather than working part-time for HRB. What alternatives to working at HRB does anyone propose to gain some practical experience?
going on 11 years

Redlands, CA

#79 Sep 9, 2007
I must be insane...the CEO for last tax season got over 5 1/2 million dollars. Well helloooooo, where the heck is my take. Us preparers are the ones that are doing the taxes and keeping clients happy (even when they dump on us). You keep uping your prices, no wonder people are going to Jackson Hewitt and Liberty and the mom's and pop's. Time to leave your screwed up company.
going on 11 years

Redlands, CA

#80 Sep 9, 2007
class starts next week wrote:
I will be taking the HRB basic tax class beginning next week. I already have a well paying full-time job, and am more interested in doing taxes on the side on my own rather than working part-time for HRB. What alternatives to working at HRB does anyone propose to gain some practical experience?
The only way that you will be able to take the HRB basic tax class is through a franchise office. Company owned offices started what they call "Basic Building Blocks - B3" this year and you have to sign paperwork stating that you will not work someone else or reveal any information about them. What a big joke, who do they think they are...ya you sign it, but you never reveal that you will be working for someone else. That's funny, how are they going to find out, besides it is not legal (in california and most other states). Aren't they stupid?
going on 11 years

Redlands, CA

#81 Sep 9, 2007
wondering why wrote:
It has been a months since we received our final paychecks for the 2007 tax season. The final compensation was figured by both the old method (the National Plan) and the new method (the IP Plan), but the total volume amount differed on which the calculations were made. As of the exit interview, we were told that this discrepancy would be looked into, but we yet to hear anything. My calculations of total volume for the season match the amount on the IP plan. The amount of volume on the “National Plan” is $2345 less, and that was the plan on which I received my bonus. At 30% pay, that amounts to over $700. I feel that an explanation or adjusted payment is overdue.
I mailed this concern to H&R Block headquarters, attention accounting a few months ago, and e-mailed it to a My Block site in the last month, and have yet to receive a reply.
Still wondering.
They took out all of the ones that you gave coupons too and they people you did that did not pay...duh!
suzette

Corea, ME

#82 Sep 18, 2007
I've worked for block off and on over the years. Last year I went back because I'm retired now. I already knew the pay was very low and I could make more at McDonald's, but I like doing taxes and I don't need the money. My problem with Block is the same as ever; they don't communicate very well with their employees. The people in management are usually there just during the season and I would not have their job for a million dollars. As far as experienced preparers helping newbies, most of them won't take the time. That's the world today. I saw that if I had started out new last year I would never have survived. You are on your own. I ended up in Wal-Mart which at first I didn't like, but after a while I began to see the advantages. We were not busy at all so I just spent a lot of time on the IRS web site looking up stuff and reading the Block news. If I had to depend on commission I'm afraid I would end up in the negative after gas and my time. As an example of the lack of communication: "someone" said that after three years you are strictly on commission. I can only guess because they want to motivate you to get clients that return. Like that's going to happen in Wal-mart. But I finally gave up trying to find out if this was true. No one, but no one, not even my supervisor, knew, or they were not telling. The people I worked with, there for two years, didn't know. I still don't know. Seems simple, huh? The only thing I can see that is different is that they send out all these stupid surveys for preparers to fill out. And they have these classes about how to deal with clients, etc. taught by people who found out yesterday they were teaching the class. One just sat on the table and told us about his career in D.C. Nice guy. It's as disorganized as it always has been. By the way, DO NOT go into a Wal-mart on April 13 with a box of receipts and want a S-corp or LLC return done. Assuming that all preparers have the same level of expertise is stupid; I don't care what the commericials say. Finally, for the first time, the Block classes are being taught on the computer. No more paper returns from the stone age. But, if you plan to work for another franchise, don't tell them because you can't take the class. I don't know what will happen to all the accountants who relied on Block for practical knowledge about preparing returns. A BIG loss to them. College only teaches theory. So, all in all, Block is still the same mess it always was, but I just keep my head down, do the best I can for anyone who walks in the door, and ignore the rest. There are a lot of good preparers there; you have to ask around. Thank God I'm retired.

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