Thousands of Bolivians march in support of Morales

Oct 12, 2011 Full story: Arab News 12

LA PAZ, Bolivia: Tens of thousands of Bolivians have converged on the center of the capital to show support for leftist President Evo Morales in his faceoff against lowlands Indians over a jungle highway.

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Shaddap Alred E

Santa Cruz, Bolivia

#1 Oct 13, 2011
Again, they were forced to march. Yesterday at about 4 pm the institutions were taking a "roll call" off all the employees they had obligated to march to see who had remained at the march all day. Those who did not show up for the march and did not stay for the entire day will almost certainly be losing their jobs.
PAUL SHYKORA Arts

Calgary, Canada

#2 Nov 9, 2011
..IN many WAY's He is....OKAY...eh.
BoliviaBound

Bronx, NY

#3 Nov 10, 2011
I went online to Travel Explosion and saw a little bit of Boliva. For those of you that have been there, what's it like?
Pete Giroffano

Falls Church, VA

#4 Nov 13, 2011
NOT GOOD, Bolivia is a communist country;
No free press
No free markets
No radios or TV and
No internet access
COMMUNISM is worst than CUBA.
CUBA at least allows you to buy some property, but NOT in Bolivia
everything, even your house is owned by the government.
All the hotels, cars and houses are STATE OWNED. People pay a tax every year for these properties, since it is government owned.
BETTER OFF IF YOU VISIT CUBA OR CROATIA.
The last time i went to Bolivia, I was questioned by the military
for questioning as to why the hotels are not private.

I went online to Travel Explosion and saw a little bit of Boliva. For those of you that have been there, what's it like?

Since: Feb 09

Los Angeles, CA

#5 Nov 14, 2011
WTF????

I don't know which Bolivia you went to, Petey, but my wife's family there owns plenty of property. In fact, enough that we are selling it little by little (around Santa Cruz) and making a nice sum of money because at least there, the land costs a LOT more than the construction of houses does. Maybe it is different for us, because she and her family have owned the land for many generations. They have plenty of modern (even flat screen) TVs and radio (my wife's cousins have several tiendas around bolivia and they are making lots of money now that the economy is slowly taking off again).

It is NOT a communist country, although Uncle Evo is trying his damnedest to make it so. But that won't happen.

The press, of course, like any socialist-leaning democracy, is censored by the government, but the spirit of the people there is such that there will be an assasination or revolution before the country would ever go communist. Not gonna happen.

By and large, the people of Bolivia (at least those I know in Santa Cruz) are lovers of life, and a caring and hard-working (and hard partying) people.

The country is rich in history and, although it is behind by about 10 years or so in some aspects, it is rapidly catching up with the rest of the world technology-wise.

I love the country and its people. I will be retiring there within 10 years, but not before the next election, when Uncle Evo is thrown out on his ass by the very people he used and trampled on to get elected. If he makes it, he should count himself lucky that his own "people" have not dismissed him in a way more common in Bolivia than being "voted out".
BoliviaBella

Santa Cruz, Bolivia

#6 Nov 17, 2011
Pete Giroffano wrote:
NOT GOOD, Bolivia is a communist country;
No free press
No free markets
No radios or TV and
No internet access
COMMUNISM is worst than CUBA.
CUBA at least allows you to buy some property, but NOT in Bolivia
everything, even your house is owned by the government.
All the hotels, cars and houses are STATE OWNED. People pay a tax every year for these properties, since it is government owned.
BETTER OFF IF YOU VISIT CUBA OR CROATIA.
The last time i went to Bolivia, I was questioned by the military
for questioning as to why the hotels are not private.
I went online to Travel Explosion and saw a little bit of Boliva. For those of you that have been there, what's it like?
I'm not sure which Bolivia you visited but the one I live in isn't at all like you describe. While it is true that the left-leaning government is socialist it is not communist, nor is the country. Cuba, on the other hand, is a communist country and until last week (yes last week) foreigners could, but Cubans could NOT purchase land or homes or sell their land or homes. Until last year no one was allowed cellphones, and to this day only certain people (such as reporters) are allowed to have internet in their homes.

In Bolivia, on the other hand:
private property ownership is rampant and protected by law and the constitution, as is private home ownership,

foreigners can purchase homes and property with no problem even if they aren't residents,

Bolivians certainly can purchase any amount of property they want to or can afford, houses and apartments too,

we have modern phone, cellphone and internet service,

dozens of privately-owned television stations, satellite and cable TV providing nearly 200 channels,

hundreds of privately-owned radio stations throughout the country (radio is even more popular than TV),

NONE of the hotels are state-owned and yes, you do pay a tax on real estate and cars, just as you do in the U.S.

You're welcome to view my website for more info on what Bolivia is truly like. Your site isn't well informed. You should really actually visit the country before you write articles about it.

http://www.boliviabella.com
willie dee

Idaho Falls, ID

#7 Dec 1, 2011
Yes, Bolivia is beautiful, and yes, Bolivia Bella has one of my favorite websites, and yes, Pete G. is wrong................but, so are all the supporters blogging here. Bolivia has a dictator. All property may be seized after only the accusation of a crime (usually opposing Evo). Most of his opponents have lost their jobs, some their property, and a few their lives. Opposition still imprisoned, beaten, with no legal recourse would contest the idea of ANY freedom in BOlivia. Still, if one flys below the radar, it is a wonderful place to visit, and fabulous people to get to know...you always must be careful in a dictatorship, and Bolivia is no exception
Sue

Colorado Springs, CO

#8 Dec 10, 2011
Thank you Callate, for clarifying things for the gentlement that spoke before. I too have lived in Bolivia and was happy when "Uncle" Evo was elected though now, I'm not so sure. Thanks for setting the record straight regarding TV, radio and news media. The country is still more, but many things have changed since the 1952 Revolution and the people now have a voice. Let that voice be heard!
Callate wrote:
WTF????
I don't know which Bolivia you went to, Petey, but my wife's family there owns plenty of property. In fact, enough that we are selling it little by little (around Santa Cruz) and making a nice sum of money because at least there, the land costs a LOT more than the construction of houses does. Maybe it is different for us, because she and her family have owned the land for many generations. They have plenty of modern (even flat screen) TVs and radio (my wife's cousins have several tiendas around bolivia and they are making lots of money now that the economy is slowly taking off again).
It is NOT a communist country, although Uncle Evo is trying his damnedest to make it so. But that won't happen.
The press, of course, like any socialist-leaning democracy, is censored by the government, but the spirit of the people there is such that there will be an assasination or revolution before the country would ever go communist. Not gonna happen.
By and large, the people of Bolivia (at least those I know in Santa Cruz) are lovers of life, and a caring and hard-working (and hard partying) people.
The country is rich in history and, although it is behind by about 10 years or so in some aspects, it is rapidly catching up with the rest of the world technology-wise.
I love the country and its people. I will be retiring there within 10 years, but not before the next election, when Uncle Evo is thrown out on his ass by the very people he used and trampled on to get elected. If he makes it, he should count himself lucky that his own "people" have not dismissed him in a way more common in Bolivia than being "voted out".
Michael Smith

Mississauga, Canada

#9 Dec 18, 2011
Bolivia Communist? Hardly. People own property and there are more and more foreign companies finally investing in Bolivia. Yes it still needs to improve a lot. The socialist ways need to change or they will stay forever poor. Great country to visit for sure. More interesting than Croatia unless you want to visit their Nazi death camps from WWII when Croatia was a Hitler ally. I'll take Bolivia.
Pete Giroffano wrote:
NOT GOOD, Bolivia is a communist country;
No free press
No free markets
No radios or TV and
No internet access
COMMUNISM is worst than CUBA.
CUBA at least allows you to buy some property, but NOT in Bolivia
everything, even your house is owned by the government.
All the hotels, cars and houses are STATE OWNED. People pay a tax every year for these properties, since it is government owned.
BETTER OFF IF YOU VISIT CUBA OR CROATIA.
The last time i went to Bolivia, I was questioned by the military
for questioning as to why the hotels are not private.
I went online to Travel Explosion and saw a little bit of Boliva. For those of you that have been there, what's it like?
kegbender

Paw Paw, WV

#10 Dec 20, 2011
BoliviaBound wrote:
I went online to Travel Explosion and saw a little bit of Boliva. For those of you that have been there, what's it like?
I have been there twice and depart again in one week for another two weeks. It's people are kind, gracious and most helpful. English language is not commonly spoken so you may need to have some command of basic Spanish. Don't drink the water; purchase bottled water only. Don't eat fresh fruits and vegetables unless there is a thick skin to remove e.g. bananas and oranges. I suggest picking up a copy of Lonely Planet's guide to Bolivia. It's simply THE best resources for travel to Bolivia available. There is so much to do and see that you'll want to go back. Enjoy!
Sue

Colorado Springs, CO

#11 Dec 21, 2011
I lived in Bolivia as a child and love it still; I visited in 2007 and will go back again this year. Read my novel, "When the Eagle Flies with the Condor, a Novel of the Sixties," to get an inside view of the people and traditions. It's a novel but it's also a realistic and insightful view of the life there before Uncle Evo.
www.suemcghee.com

Since: Feb 09

Los Angeles, CA

#12 Jan 13, 2012
I am also heading over again mid-February for three weeks in Santa Cruz and Tarija with family. I guess I better buy some "old" clothes so I don't ruin new ones with paint during Carnaval.:)

I hope the Paceņa factory is ramping up for my visit. I think last time I was there they almost ran out ;)

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