Macedonia: 20 years of independence i...

Macedonia: 20 years of independence in limbo

There are 61 comments on the Pravda story from Sep 15, 2011, titled Macedonia: 20 years of independence in limbo. In it, Pravda reports that:

Macedonia has recently celebrated its 20th birthday. The country had to prove the rights for existence during all of those years.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Pravda.

First Prev
of 4
Next Last

“Love Life”

Since: Oct 10

Location hidden

#1 Sep 15, 2011
Well,
I dont fell the need to add anything.

The Russian historian, Vladimir Putyatin knows very well the truth and history. So, my dear fellow Fyromians, you don't have to hear anything from Greece.
Just read the comments of our common brother, Russian historian,Vladimir Putyatin.
FYROMongolas

Solna, Sweden

#2 Sep 15, 2011
"Historian Vladimir Putyatin, an expert for Balkans, described the future of Macedonia in dark colors.
"Macedonia declared its sovereignty 20 years ago, but the struggle for its independence is still going on. There's the struggle with Greece, Bulgaria does not recognize the Macedonian as a separate language, there's also the problem of separatism of local Albanians. All those things pose a threat to the future of this country," Putyatin said.
As we can see, the points of view about the future of Macedonia, a Slavic country situated in the heart of the Balkan Peninsula, can be completely different. The history of this region was boisterous. The Macedonians did not have their own country before 1991. The nation that used to live in ancient Macedonia had absolutely nothing in common with the present-day nation.
In the beginning of the 20th century, the coalition of Balkan countries (Bulgaria, Serbia, Greece and Montenegro) declared war on the Ottoman Empire. As a result, eastern Macedonia became a part of Bulgaria. The southern part of the country became a part of Greece, whereas the northern part belonged to Serbia. The Slavic population was the minority in the Greek part of Macedonia. In Bulgaria, they tried to assimilate the Macedonians, to declare them the Bulgarians. As a result, there is no separatism among the Bulgarian Macedonians today - the majority of them think of themselves as the Bulgarians.
The fight for independence was happening in the former "Serbian" Macedonia. Unlike Bulgaria and Greece, this part of the Macedonian people had to live in the multinational Yugoslavia, which eased their struggle for independence. A socialist republic was established within Yugoslavia after WWII. This republic then evolved into the present-day Macedonia.
The Albanians were not happy about the fact that they received no territorial authority in 1991. They also wanted their language to be recognized as the second official language of the country. The situation took a turn for the worse in 1999, when hundreds of thousands of Kosovo Albanians began to flee to Macedonia because of the bombing of Yugoslavia. Large-scale armed clashes between the Albanian army of national liberation and Macedonian regular troops were happening in February-August of 2001. The conflict was regulated after the interference of NATO and the EU. NATO troops, which appeared in Macedonia in 1991, are still deployed in the country.
The Macedonian authorities had to make concessions to the Albanians under the pressure from the West. The Albanians were represented in the government, they received a separate TV channel, their language was given an official status in some regions. However, the Albanians still want to federalize the country and achieve absolute equality of the two languages.
The economic situation in the country leaves much to be desired. The country has no access to sea and takes one of the lowest places in Europe in terms of the living standard. There is no developed industry in the country; the agriculture is not competitive from the point of view of European standards. As for tourism, Macedonia lags far behind Montenegro and Bulgaria, not to mention Greece.
Hundreds of people gathered in the center of Skopje to celebrate the 20th anniversary of independence. They have every reason to celebrate: Macedonia was recognized by all countries of the world. The country is represented in the UN, the OSCE, the Council of Europe, FIFA and the International Olympic Committee. Nevertheless, Macedonia has a lot to work on."
Vadim Trukhachev
FYROMongolas

Solna, Sweden

#3 Sep 15, 2011
No future for FYRmongolia..albanians will take over the country.
umm

Hamilton, Canada

#4 Sep 15, 2011
Pravda is a joke.
Xenofon

Canada

#5 Sep 15, 2011
"As we can see, the points of view about the future of FYROM (Vardarska Banovina), a Slavic country situated in the heart of the Balkan Peninsula, can be completely different. The history of this region was boisterous. The Vardarskans did not have their own country before 1991. The nation that used to live in ancient Macedonia had absolutely nothing in common with the present-day nation."

Open your eyes and see the truth you retarded turkoslavs!

Makedonia was born Greek not Vardarskan Turkoslavic!

“Aposkotison me!”

Since: Jan 11

Athina

#6 Sep 15, 2011
umm wrote:
Pravda is a joke.
Actually this is what Hitler and all his funs say.
Nick the Greek

Liverpool, UK

#7 Sep 15, 2011
Xenofon

Canada

#8 Sep 15, 2011
No comment Turkoslavs? Not surprised!

Makedonia was born Greek not Turkoslavic!
Myra

Australia

#10 Sep 15, 2011
FYROM:

Do not confuse yourselves being 'Ancient Macedonians' who were a GREEK speaking tribe.

You are SLAVO-macedonians of Bulgarian origins.
Spartan

Ottawa, Canada

#11 Sep 15, 2011
Where is Rosetta and Tranny Jany aka "the Vlados". No comment from those two Baboons. Article made too much sense for them.
Eli

Toronto, Canada

#12 Sep 15, 2011
Spartan wrote:
Where is Rosetta and Tranny Jany aka "the Vlados". No comment from those two Baboons. Article made too much sense for them.
Hello Mississauga

This is Toronto aka East York calling,

Did you hear about Bob Rae's comments?
Myra

Australia

#13 Sep 15, 2011
The Slav Macedonian ideology during the second half of 19th century was at its inception. One of the first preserved accounts is an article The Macedonian question by Petko Slavejkov, published on 18 January 1871 in the "Macedonia" newspaper in Constantinople. In 1880, Gjorgi Pulevski published Slognica Rechovska in Sofia as an attempt at a grammar of the language of the Slavs who lived in Macedonia. Although he had no formal education, Pulevski published several other books, including three dictionaries and a collection of songs from Macedonia, customs, and holidays. In 1888, Kuzman Shapkarev wrote to Marin Drinov with regard to the usage of the words Macedonian and Bulgarian:

"But even stranger is the name Macedontsi, which was imposed on us only 10 to 15 years ago by outsiders, and not as something by our own intellectuals.... Yet the people in Macedonia know nothing of that ancient name, reintroduced today with a cunning aim on the one hand and a stupid one on the other. They know the older word: Bugari, although mispronounced: they have even adopted it as peculiarly theirs, inapplicable to other Bulgarians".

The first significant manifestation of Slav Macedonian nationalism was the book (Za Makedonckite Raboti - On Macedonian Matters, Sofia, 1903) by Krste Misirkov. In the book Misirkov advocated that the Slavs of Macedonia should take a separate way from the Bulgarians and the Bulgarian language. Misirkov considered that the term "Macedonian" should be used to define the whole Slavic population of Macedonia, obliterating the existing division between Greeks, Bulgarians and Serbians. The adoption of a separate "Macedonian language" was also advocated as a means of unification of the Ethnic Macedonians with Serbian, Bulgarian and Greek consciousness. On Macedonian Matters was written in the South Slavic dialect spoken in central Bitola-Prilep. This dialect was proposed by Misirkov as the basis for the future language, and, as Misirkov says, a dialect which is most different from all other neighboring languages (as the eastern dialect was too close to Bulgarian and the northern one too close to Serbian). Misirkov calls this language Macedonian.

While Misirkov talked about the Macedonian consciousness and the Macedonian language as a future goal, he described the wider region of Macedonia in the early 20th century as inhabited by Bulgarians, Greeks, Serbs, Turks, Albanians, Aromanians, and Jews. As regards to the Ethnic Macedonians themselves, Misirkov maintained that they had called themselves Bulgarians until the publication of the book and were always called Bulgarians by independent observers until 1878 when the Serbian views also started to get recognition. Misirkov rejected the ideas in On Macedonian Matters later and turned into a staunch advocate of the Bulgarian cause - only to return to the (Slav) Macedonian idea again in the 1920s.

Volker und Sprachenkarte der Balkan - Halbinsel 1924, Leipzig
Another prominent activist for the ethnic Macedonian national revival was Dimitrija upovski, who was one of the founders and the president of the Macedonian Literary Society established in Saint Petersburg in 1902. During the 1913-18 period, upovski published the newspaper Makedonski Golos'(i )(meaning Macedonian voice) in which he and fellow members of the Petersburg Macedonian Colony propagandized the existence of a separate Macedonian people different from Greeks, Bulgarians and Serbs, and were struggling for popularizing the idea for an independent Macedonian state.
Myra

Australia

#14 Sep 15, 2011
Following the Second Balkan War in 1913, the partition of Macedonia among three entities who had taken part in the battle (Serbia, Greece and Bulgaria) placed today's territory within the Kingdom of Serbia. Serbian rule ensured that all Slav Macedonian symbolism and identity were henceforth proscribed, and only standard Serbian was permitted to be spoken by the locals of Macedonia. In addition, Serbia did not refer to its southern land as Macedonia, a legacy which remains in place today among Serbian nationalists (e.g. the Serbian Radical Party).
The ideas of Misirkov, Pulevski and other ethnic Macedonian Slavs would remain largely unnoticed until the 1940s when they were adopted by the Socialist Republic of Yugoslavia influencing the codification of the Macedonian language. Claims of present-day historians from the former Yugoslav Socialist Republic of Macedonia that the "Autonomists" in IMRO who defended a Macedonian position are largely ungrounded. IMRO regarded itself - and was regarded by the Ottoman authorities, the Greek guerrilla groups, the contemporary press in Europe and even by Misirkov -as an exclusively Bulgarian organization. The present-day historians from the Republic of Macedonia claim that IMRO was split into two factions: the first aimed an ethnic Macedonian state, and the second believed in a Macedonia as a part of wider Bulgarian entity
Myra

Australia

#15 Sep 15, 2011
Spartan wrote:
Where is Rosetta and Tranny Jany aka "the Vlados". No comment from those two Baboons. Article made too much sense for them.
H psoletta aka queen of nonsense strimmeno endero einai
Ljupco

Perth, Australia

#16 Sep 15, 2011
My family has been living in Australia for decades and I have a few relatives in Macedonia. I don't know how all this Alexander stuff started. I am a proud Slavic-sourced European, and I consider my neighbours Serbia, Croatia, Bulgaria as my brothers. Why are we bothering with Greeks and pretending to talk about Alexander the Great? My family never considered this in the past! Why are we doing this suddenly?
Makedonec

Epping, Australia

#17 Sep 15, 2011
Makedonija za zivot!

Since: Mar 09

Athens, Greece

#18 Sep 15, 2011
Ljupco wrote:
My family has been living in Australia for decades and I have a few relatives in Macedonia. I don't know how all this Alexander stuff started. I am a proud Slavic-sourced European, and I consider my neighbours Serbia, Croatia, Bulgaria as my brothers. Why are we bothering with Greeks and pretending to talk about Alexander the Great? My family never considered this in the past! Why are we doing this suddenly?
Very good question! I hope one of your compatriots that believes in all that 'antik Makedonski' nonsense will give an answer!
Daskalesku

Macedonia

#19 Sep 16, 2011
Macedonia: 20 years of independence
http://www.setimes.com/cocoon/setimes/xhtml/e...
PHILIP THE MACEDONIAN

Hausmannstatten, Austria

#20 Sep 16, 2011
Daskalesku wrote:
Macedonia: 20 years of independence
http://www.setimes.com/cocoon/setimes/xhtml/e...
Bre Fakedonski glavata!
Can not you understand, that this language is Serbian and not Macedonian? Your logic is not enough?
MACEDONIAN WARRIOR

Athens, Greece

#21 Sep 16, 2011
Daskalesku wrote:
Macedonia: 20 years of independence
http://www.setimes.com/cocoon/setimes/xhtml/e...
FREEDOM to TRANSYLVANIA.
TRANSYLVANIA belongs to HUNGARY.....

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 4
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Kosovo, Bulgaria Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News Serbia Boycotts Croatia Summit Over Kosovo (Jul '12) Jun '15 Albano-Skopje 3
News Hashim Thaci: Even Serbia Will Recognize Kosovo... May '15 Hungarian 101 18
FYROM==>>WlLL BE DESTROYED May '15 FYROMIAN CANCER 1
News Poverty spurs mass migration from Kosovo Feb '15 sava 12
News SCTE(TM) and ECEBE Launch Joint Event in Hungary (Jan '15) Jan '15 servonazis 3
News Russia gives blankets to Kosovo Serbs instead o... (Dec '11) Jan '15 PUTIN lost SERBIA 99
News In fight for influence, Russia can play good co... (Nov '14) Dec '14 blimey 4
More from around the web