Car owner devoted to maintenance can blow past 100,000 on odometer ...

This 1989 Saab 900 SPG was driven more than 1 million miles with its original engine before being parked at a Wisconsin museum in 2007. Full Story
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George G

United States

#1 Sep 30, 2010
I would tend to agree. I would say that the new threshold for "worn out" is at about 140,000 miles. That's about how long most cars last before it become impractical to maintain them.
Observer

Columbus, OH

#2 Sep 30, 2010
Oh, I don't know, George, what with the tighter tolerances and the constant computer control of the engine, I would say it is more typical to get over 200,000 miles on a car, if not a good deal more. I am one of those perfection maintenance guys, you know, who change their brake fluid every 20,000 miles as it says to do in the owners manual. Many people don't know about this, but with ABS brakes, it is important to have fresh fluid that often due to the moisture that brake fluid sucks out of the air.
ODaized

Des Moines, IA

#3 Sep 30, 2010
My 1991 honda crx has 261,500 on it. I have hit a deer, a man on a bike, and been hit by a semi. That honda just keeps on humming.
BIG JOE

Columbus, OH

#4 Sep 30, 2010
ODaized wrote:
My 1991 honda crx has 261,500 on it. I have hit a deer, a man on a bike, and been hit by a semi. That honda just keeps on humming.
Stay away from me !!!
bogr1

Springboro, OH

#5 Sep 30, 2010
Yeah, but the car is only going to be as good as the parts and craftsmanship built into it. I was once of the the most hard-core GM guys out there. I baby all my cars and take very good care of them. Despite that, no GM vehicle I ever owned made it 50K, let alone 100K, before falling apart or breaking down or both. Poor build quality and cheap parts from an automaker more concerned with quantity rather than quality. Since I've owned Hondas and Toyotas I've not done one repair. Not only that, but their still as solid and smooth at 100k + as they are when first buy them. No GM will ever be able to do that. And don't buy the new GM propaganda either. The new GM is the old GM; always has been, always will be.
TOYOTA FAN

Columbus, OH

#6 Sep 30, 2010
I agree. 200,000 is more realistic now and days. you just need to take care of your car.
long term

United States

#7 Sep 30, 2010
bogr1 wrote:
Yeah, but the car is only going to be as good as the parts and craftsmanship built into it. I was once of the the most hard-core GM guys out there. I baby all my cars and take very good care of them. Despite that, no GM vehicle I ever owned made it 50K, let alone 100K, before falling apart or breaking down or both. Poor build quality and cheap parts from an automaker more concerned with quantity rather than quality. Since I've owned Hondas and Toyotas I've not done one repair. Not only that, but their still as solid and smooth at 100k + as they are when first buy them. No GM will ever be able to do that. And don't buy the new GM propaganda either. The new GM is the old GM; always has been, always will be.
My GM is still ticking at @ 190,000. She's had her issues, but those repair costs look smaller every year when seen through the lens of 10+ years with no monthly car payment.
Chris

Columbus, OH

#8 Sep 30, 2010
I've got 140K on my Olds Alero and it still runs like a champ! Replaced the timing belt at 100K and the wheel bearings at 120K and that's about it.
Investing

Columbus, OH

#9 Sep 30, 2010
"It's your second-most-expensive investment. You want to take care of it," Ok, then what is your first? I have learned that investing in a car is like buying junk bonds and gambling...you never really break even...
kids mom

Columbus, OH

#10 Sep 30, 2010
bogr1 wrote:
Yeah, but the car is only going to be as good as the parts and craftsmanship built into it. I was once of the the most hard-core GM guys out there. I baby all my cars and take very good care of them. Despite that, no GM vehicle I ever owned made it 50K, let alone 100K, before falling apart or breaking down or both. Poor build quality and cheap parts from an automaker more concerned with quantity rather than quality. Since I've owned Hondas and Toyotas I've not done one repair. Not only that, but their still as solid and smooth at 100k + as they are when first buy them. No GM will ever be able to do that. And don't buy the new GM propaganda either. The new GM is the old GM; always has been, always will be.
exactly right...gm is gm is gm is gm
Parasite Government

Hilliard, OH

#11 Sep 30, 2010
We have a Toyota with 148,000 miles, and while it is cheaper to keep it, I would buy a new car without question if I didn't have two young children to raise.

My buddy has a Toyota with over 300,000 miles - it is a nasty, ratty, noisy, unpleasant vehicle, but he has a family to raise as well.

You can keep a car for 200,000 miles as a back-up, but who really wants to drive an old beater every day if they really don't need to?
long term

United States

#12 Sep 30, 2010
Parasite Government wrote:
We have a Toyota with 148,000 miles, and while it is cheaper to keep it, I would buy a new car without question if I didn't have two young children to raise.
My buddy has a Toyota with over 300,000 miles - it is a nasty, ratty, noisy, unpleasant vehicle, but he has a family to raise as well.
You can keep a car for 200,000 miles as a back-up, but who really wants to drive an old beater every day if they really don't need to?
It all comes down to what you want to spend your hard earned money on.
Sam

New Kensington, PA

#13 Sep 30, 2010
My trusty old 1998 Accord has 275k on it and is running better than it ever has. I'll drive it until it falls apart because not having to make a car payment right now is a wonderful thing.
BRVulgar

New York, NY

#14 Sep 30, 2010
Investing wrote:
"It's your second-most-expensive investment. You want to take care of it," Ok, then what is your first? I have learned that investing in a car is like buying junk bonds and gambling...you never really break even...
Ummm, a house.....
Bob

Oklahoma City, OK

#15 Sep 30, 2010
2002 Taurus, 57 miles short of 200,000 miles. Still gets 28 mpg on highway. Original engine, transmission rebuilt at 160,000 miles.
OtherKevin

Canal Winchester, OH

#16 Sep 30, 2010
My first car was a Pontiac that made it just over 100k miles. My second car was a Pontiac that made it to 180k miles before I had to get rid of it. I traded it in for a Honda. That Honda Civic ran for 320k miles. The body had some dings in it and there was some rust, but it was mechanically almost as good as the day that I bought it. My next car was a Ford, and I ditched it at 110k miles (starting to rust) for an Acura. I'm at 85k on it and the car is like new. I look forward to running this one up to 300k miles too.

I think that it's a pretty simple process:

1. Buy a car that is known for it's quality (i.e., not American).
2. Do routine maintenance.
3. Enjoy many years of faithful service.

If you can't get at least 200k miles out of a car this way then there is something wrong.
Thinker

Reynoldsburg, OH

#17 Sep 30, 2010
Perhaps the Dispatch should have fact checked this article. Walmart actually installs air filters for free.

What quick lube chains put the fluids in the wrong spot? Names, dates, please.

Car run longer because they are made with better engineering, materials, and a computer controls nearly all the functions.
Thinker

Reynoldsburg, OH

#18 Sep 30, 2010
Got rid of my last two cars at 198,000 - 2.8 Beretta, and 192,000 Altima. Being able to fix the frequent problems which happen at higher miles - economically is crucial.

My current car has 94,000 - Sonata, but don't think it was made out of good enough materials to get past 150k.
I TOLD YOU SO

Westerville, OH

#19 Sep 30, 2010
What a riot...even the "quick lube" places that put the correct fluid in, then go on to leave the cap off. Most "repair" shops are staffed by incompetent lunatics who couldn't read instructions or follow directions if you wired the same right to their brain. Stay away from so-called "repair" shops and do your own work like I do (my car is 26 years old and runs just fine).
Thinker wrote:
Perhaps the Dispatch should have fact checked this article. Walmart actually installs air filters for free.
What quick lube chains put the fluids in the wrong spot? Names, dates, please.
Car run longer because they are made with better engineering, materials, and a computer controls nearly all the functions.
Ed Nugent

Cincinnati, OH

#20 Sep 30, 2010
Good riddance to the badly mismanaged '00's.

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