Does Toyota's Hydrogen Car Prove They...

Does Toyota's Hydrogen Car Prove They're Eco-Clueless?

There are 6 comments on the Jalopnik story from Aug 30, 2013, titled Does Toyota's Hydrogen Car Prove They're Eco-Clueless?. In it, Jalopnik reports that:

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kev

Buffalo, NY

#1 Aug 31, 2013
I'm quite surprised general motors has no hydrogen fuel cell cars on the roaf. They spent over 1 billion on this program over ten years ago. Where r the fruits of the labor ?
Pete

Livonia, MI

#2 Sep 1, 2013
kev wrote:
I'm quite surprised general motors has no hydrogen fuel cell cars on the roaf. They spent over 1 billion on this program over ten years ago. Where r the fruits of the labor ?
GM also spent a bundle on their first electric car and that was a bust. And now the Volt is not much better in terms of sales and profit. When technology gains traction, it is not that difficult to catch up and overtake the competition. Bill Gates thought the internet was an aberration in the early years too. Then he recognized the wave and jumped on it. GM may feel they don't want to be the betamax this time. Electric is proven and has basic infrastructure in place. Battery tech is improving in weight reduction and density. Hydrogen has more potential for fleet use until a breakthrough in on-board conversion comes along.
kev

Toledo, OH

#3 Sep 1, 2013
I have heard that general motors technology is available to others for a price. If say for instance someone wanted their fuel cell info it might cost 40 million. But look how many takers it would involve just to break even. The japanese i heard used to reverse engineer things. I am sure some products were easier to duplicate with changes than others so as not to impose on patent. Also the japanese have been known to improve designs from othet countries for efficiency.germany also has fuel cell technology. How much it is in widespread use,not certain.this gas is extremely volatile! Special provisions for filling up auto has to be made.also car i am sure is volatile. Imagine this car being involved in crash.maybe this is where the impractica . Uses r involved.electric cars pose no problem.
Pete

Livonia, MI

#4 Sep 1, 2013
kev wrote:
I have heard that general motors technology is available to others for a price. If say for instance someone wanted their fuel cell info it might cost 40 million. But look how many takers it would involve just to break even. The japanese i heard used to reverse engineer things. I am sure some products were easier to duplicate with changes than others so as not to impose on patent. Also the japanese have been known to improve designs from othet countries for efficiency.germany also has fuel cell technology. How much it is in widespread use,not certain.this gas is extremely volatile! Special provisions for filling up auto has to be made.also car i am sure is volatile. Imagine this car being involved in crash.maybe this is where the impractica . Uses r involved.electric cars pose no problem.
Companies trade in technology as a rule. They also work together to manage a standard for such things as charging ports. Hydrogen cars can be pretty safe with heavy gauge tanks. On-board conversion merely takes a fuel and converts it to hydrogen so there is not volatile fuel quantity. We carry gallons of explosive gas and think nothing about it.

Electrics carry different risks with higher voltages and potentially toxic chemical spills.

Pedestrians and bikers have a much greater risk of injury.
kev

Toledo, OH

#5 Sep 2, 2013
The hydrogen fuel is volatile about on same level as nitroglycerin. Gasoline handling and storage in tanks doesn't compare to this highly sensitive nature of how it has to be handled extremely careful.i talked to engineer a decade ago.
Pete

Livonia, MI

#6 Sep 2, 2013
kev wrote:
The hydrogen fuel is volatile about on same level as nitroglycerin. Gasoline handling and storage in tanks doesn't compare to this highly sensitive nature of how it has to be handled extremely careful.i talked to engineer a decade ago.
Ten years ago? That is ancient in technology. Hydrogen has been used successfully for 40 years. Everybody that stayed on the Hindenburg survived. The 35 who dies did so from jumping off. Hydrogen does not need to be stored in heavy high pressure tanks. Hydrogen can be trapped in metal hydride and you could fuel up like a regular vehicle. There are prototype vehicles using this technology.

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