Toyota recalls 86,500 hybrids in the U.S, 250,000 cars total :...

Jun 5, 2013 Full story: AutoWeek 117

Toyota Motor Corp. is recalling 242,000 hybrid vehicles worldwide, including 86,500 Toyota Prius and Lexus HS 250h hybrids in the United States, to fix a braking glitch.

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liner

Patchogue, NY

#82 Jun 13, 2013
Root wrote:
Toyota has announced that its market share glory days are over in the US. Toyota's continued market share drop is really due to two things:
Massive Recalls and the SUA killings.
It can't be because of SUA killings, because you couldn't find any record of them, right?
Windsor Lad

Windsor, Canada

#83 Jun 13, 2013
This is an example of free speech....

I agree with Liner.
The Troll Trap instigator is misrepresenting the truth.
He infers there were "killings" because of SUA.
The Troll Trap instigator has been unable to back up his claim.
Simply because there is no proof of his contention.

Beware of the Troll Trap instigator.
He uses false claims and unverified inferences to "bait" others into confrontation.
Root

Shreveport, LA

#84 Jun 13, 2013
liner wrote:
<quoted text>
It can't be because of SUA killings, because you couldn't find any record of them, right?
That is a valid response and I thank you for that. In my opinion it could be related to recalls and fines. How about increased competition from Americans? Another valid point could be increased competition from South Koreans.
Windsor Lad

Windsor, Canada

#85 Jun 13, 2013
This is an example of free speech....

After many pages of bold but unsupported claims about alleged "killings", the Troll Trap instigator finally issues an admission that every one of his numerous frivolous inferences about "killings" was nothing but fluff.

What does this tell us about the integrity of the Troll Trap instigator?
Only that when he gets caught in a blatant lie does he finally admit his folly.
Root

Shreveport, LA

#86 Jun 13, 2013
liner wrote:
<quoted text>
It can't be because of SUA killings, because you couldn't find any record of them, right?
While I still believe the wrongful death lawsuits coupled with the SUA recalls are part of the equation there are definitely other factors involved. As long as GM and Ford and to a lesser extent Chrysler continue to offer a competitive option, there is no need for the American car buyer to seek out an import.

“Most Honored Senior Member ”

Since: Jun 09

Dallas, TX.

#87 Jun 13, 2013
Toyota was really in the right place at the right time when they hit their peak here in the USA. The landscape is a bit different now. The economy is another hard hitting factor in what type of cars the consumer decides to buy.
liner

Patchogue, NY

#88 Jun 13, 2013
Root wrote:
<quoted text>
While I still believe the wrongful death lawsuits coupled with the SUA recalls are part of the equation there are definitely other factors involved. As long as GM and Ford and to a lesser extent Chrysler continue to offer a competitive option, there is no need for the American car buyer to seek out an import.
But don't you agree that it's great to live in a free country, like the USA? Where you're free to buy whatever car you want? You DO like living in the greatest country in the world, don't you? Unless you would like living in North Korea, where you could only buy North Korean cars.
Root

Shreveport, LA

#89 Jun 13, 2013
liner wrote:
<quoted text>
But don't you agree that it's great to live in a free country, like the USA? Where you're free to buy whatever car you want? You DO like living in the greatest country in the world, don't you? Unless you would like living in North Korea, where you could only buy North Korean cars.
Absolutely! Wouldnít have it any other way. The freedom to choose any type of product is at the root of our freedom and nobody should ever say otherwise. This freedom and all others should be highly defended. I'm voting your post agree, brilliant and helpful.

“Most Honored Senior Member ”

Since: Jun 09

Dallas, TX.

#90 Jun 17, 2013
Root wrote:
<quoted text>Absolutely! Wouldnít have it any other way. The freedom to choose any type of product is at the root of our freedom and nobody should ever say otherwise. This freedom and all others should be highly defended. I'm voting your post agree, brilliant and helpful.
The freedom to buy any car you want is a good thing however we canít forget itís always in good interest to support your own companies.
liner

Patchogue, NY

#91 Jun 17, 2013
JJFADS wrote:
<quoted text>The freedom to buy any car you want is a good thing however we canít forget itís always in good interest to support your own companies.
You're right, but then we get to around and around with the old "where do the profits go" rehash. I think you would agree that the auto industry is entirely different now than even 5 years ago and certainly 10 or 15 years ago.
Root

Shreveport, LA

#92 Jun 17, 2013
Interesting stuff for sure. For the record I drive an American truck.
Prometheus

Windsor, Canada

#93 Jun 17, 2013
Liner, allow me to jump in on that question .

The auto industry has changed tremendously in the past 10 to 15 years.
There are far more choices nowadays than there were then.
The car business has become far more competitive and much more diverse.
The business is far more "global" than it was then. Not just cars are assembled all over the world, but components are just as widely sourced everywhere in the world.
Companies have gone bankrupt, recovered from bankruptcy, gone through global economic disaster, new companies have sprung up, etc.
The entire focus of the business has changed, ie, emphasis on fuel economy, revolutionary technology, new sources of fuel, etc.
The "where do profits go" controversy has become far more complex with foreign automakers establishing themselves in "non home" countries all over the world.

It's no longer a simple thing to claim " supporting one's own country" should govern one's choice of which product to buy.
Even if that premise did apply, the vast majority of car buyers make their choices based on price and perception, and country of origin becomes lost in the equation.
liner

Patchogue, NY

#94 Jun 17, 2013
Prometheus wrote:
Liner, allow me to jump in on that question .
The auto industry has changed tremendously in the past 10 to 15 years.
There are far more choices nowadays than there were then.
The car business has become far more competitive and much more diverse.
The business is far more "global" than it was then. Not just cars are assembled all over the world, but components are just as widely sourced everywhere in the world.
Companies have gone bankrupt, recovered from bankruptcy, gone through global economic disaster, new companies have sprung up, etc.
The entire focus of the business has changed, ie, emphasis on fuel economy, revolutionary technology, new sources of fuel, etc.
The "where do profits go" controversy has become far more complex with foreign automakers establishing themselves in "non home" countries all over the world.
It's no longer a simple thing to claim " supporting one's own country" should govern one's choice of which product to buy.
Even if that premise did apply, the vast majority of car buyers make their choices based on price and perception, and country of origin becomes lost in the equation.
My point exactly.
Prometheus

Windsor, Canada

#95 Jun 17, 2013
liner wrote:
<quoted text>
My point exactly.
The point, in fact is the truth.

Evidently Root, as is his usual tactic, has voted with all the negative emoticons he could muster.

As a judge, he really sucks.

The games some people play!!
Root

Shreveport, LA

#96 Jun 17, 2013
What drives you to be so negative?

“Most Honored Senior Member ”

Since: Jun 09

Dallas, TX.

#97 Jun 18, 2013
liner wrote:
<quoted text>
You're right, but then we get to around and around with the old "where do the profits go" rehash. I think you would agree that the auto industry is entirely different now than even 5 years ago and certainly 10 or 15 years ago.
You do agree it's a good thing to support your own companies though, correct?

“Most Honored Senior Member ”

Since: Jun 09

Dallas, TX.

#98 Jun 18, 2013
Prometheus wrote:
Liner, allow me to jump in on that question .
The auto industry has changed tremendously in the past 10 to 15 years.
There are far more choices nowadays than there were then.
The car business has become far more competitive and much more diverse.
The business is far more "global" than it was then. Not just cars are assembled all over the world, but components are just as widely sourced everywhere in the world.
Companies have gone bankrupt, recovered from bankruptcy, gone through global economic disaster, new companies have sprung up, etc.
The entire focus of the business has changed, ie, emphasis on fuel economy, revolutionary technology, new sources of fuel, etc.
The "where do profits go" controversy has become far more complex with foreign automakers establishing themselves in "non home" countries all over the world.
It's no longer a simple thing to claim " supporting one's own country" should govern one's choice of which product to buy.
Even if that premise did apply, the vast majority of car buyers make their choices based on price and perception, and country of origin becomes lost in the equation.
Wrong, the profits still go to the same place they did before. Nothing has changed.
liner

Patchogue, NY

#99 Jun 18, 2013
JJFADS wrote:
<quoted text>You do agree it's a good thing to support your own companies though, correct?
The definition of "your own companies" is the issue and has been beaten to death on here ad nauseum.
Root

Shreveport, LA

#100 Jun 18, 2013
liner wrote:
<quoted text>
The definition of "your own companies" is the issue and has been beaten to death on here ad nauseum.
I think the definition of those companies would be American companies. I support American companies but I also support the freedom to buy what you want. I don't think there should be any problem with supporting American companies.
Prometheus

Windsor, Canada

#101 Jun 18, 2013
JJFADS wrote:
<quoted text>Wrong, the profits still go to the same place they did before. Nothing has changed.
Everything in my post was factual, truthful, and objective.
It was, in fact, a well thought out and informative piece.
But there was no mention of profits nor where profits go.
Why you even mentioned profits and said nothing about the various other points raised is peculiar.
You seem fixated on that particular profit issue fro some reason, yet appear to have little knowledge of flow through economics.
I suggest you take an introductory course in business economics.
That might help you develop better understanding of how profits are distributed.

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