2013VW Beetle TDI

Since: Apr 07

ridgefarm Il

#3 Feb 3, 2012
Proud Canadian wrote:
<quoted text>
Tom--it may not be the most lofty fuel economy claim, but that little VW 2 Liter diesel is one of the most reliable engines out there.
Those engines are remarkably trouble free, and will likely still be running strong when the body falls off!!
Regarding smaller turbo diesels---yes, they do deliver more "go" and better fuel economy per pound, but their reliability isn't nearly as good as normally aspirated engines.
We see quite a few premature engine and turbo failures with turbocharged engines--particularly in the smaller displacement models.
The beetle 2.0 litre engine itself is turbocharged. I don't believe smaller is less reliable. Ford obviously doesn't believe so or it wouldn't have come out with its ecoboost engines.
Proud Canadian

Belle River, Canada

#4 Feb 3, 2012
Tom Loy wrote:
<quoted text>
The beetle 2.0 litre engine itself is turbocharged. I don't believe smaller is less reliable. Ford obviously doesn't believe so or it wouldn't have come out with its ecoboost engines.
Agreed that engine does have a turbocharger, but the manifold pressure boost isn't as high as most other small diesels.
It helps a lot in the reliability department---the engine isn't tasked as heavily.
One problem I have with some manufacturers who turbocharge is they tend to overboost their engines, with inevitably reduced reliability.
A few years ago Chrysler was doing that with their 4 cylinder gassers, and most of them suffered an early death.
That said, the renovated Beetle has a 5 cylinder gasoline engine which is nicely performant--both power and fuel economy.
It's been available for a couple of years and it's a proven and reliable engine.
And I like the way VW has changed the body style, making the car look less "Beetle" looking.
Proud Canadian

Belle River, Canada

#5 Feb 3, 2012
Tom Loy wrote:
<quoted text>
The beetle 2.0 litre engine itself is turbocharged. I don't believe smaller is less reliable. Ford obviously doesn't believe so or it wouldn't have come out with its ecoboost engines.
I can't comment on the Ford Ecoboost. Haven't seen one in the shop yet.
However, I think Ford has engineered that engine well---a good balance between boost and expected performance.

Since: Apr 07

ridgefarm Il

#6 Feb 3, 2012
Proud Canadian wrote:
<quoted text>
Agreed that engine does have a turbocharger, but the manifold pressure boost isn't as high as most other small diesels.
It helps a lot in the reliability department---the engine isn't tasked as heavily.
One problem I have with some manufacturers who turbocharge is they tend to overboost their engines, with inevitably reduced reliability.
A few years ago Chrysler was doing that with their 4 cylinder gassers, and most of them suffered an early death.
That said, the renovated Beetle has a 5 cylinder gasoline engine which is nicely performant--both power and fuel economy.
It's been available for a couple of years and it's a proven and reliable engine.
And I like the way VW has changed the body style, making the car look less "Beetle" looking.
Do you know how much turbo pressure would constitute an overboosted condition? It'd be nice to know if I ever bought a turbocharged engine. Oh, and thanks for the explanation. Always glad to hear how things work.
Proud Canadian

Belle River, Canada

#7 Feb 3, 2012
Tom Loy wrote:
<quoted text>
Do you know how much turbo pressure would constitute an overboosted condition? It'd be nice to know if I ever bought a turbocharged engine. Oh, and thanks for the explanation. Always glad to hear how things work.
You don't have the right instruments in the usual North American car to determine how much boost is being applied by a turbocharger.
You would need a manifold pressure guage to do that.
One could be installed for you, but it would have to be an aftermarket accessory. Not really a big deal to get one and install it, but the car's warranty might be jeopardized if you tap into the manifold's vacuuum system. Automakers will use any excuse to nail you for doing even simple things like that.
With a manifold pressure guage, anything over 35 inches MAP would be getting toward the high side.
One thing you could do without a guage to protect against excessive boost is just go a little easy on the throttle as much as possible.

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