'Racist' Baa Baa Black Sheep ban in c...

'Racist' Baa Baa Black Sheep ban in class

There are 548 comments on the AdelaideNow... story from Feb 26, 2011, titled 'Racist' Baa Baa Black Sheep ban in class. In it, AdelaideNow... reports that:

BLACK sheep are on the endangered species list as some children in north Queensland learn to sing Baa Baa Rainbow Sheep.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at AdelaideNow....

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Tweeter

Palmerston North, New Zealand

#1 Feb 26, 2011
WTF ?

“Free Speech in a Free World ”

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#2 Feb 26, 2011
Tweeter wrote:
WTF ?
I came to see the void, and yeah well,nothing much different so too-roo
Clench

Queenstown, New Zealand

#3 Feb 26, 2011
Baa Baa Black Sheep Rhyme

"Baa, baa black sheep" Nursery Rhyme History

Educational reasons for the poem "Baa, baa black sheep"poem
The reason to the words and history to this song were to associate wool and wool products with the animal that produces it, not to mention the sound that a sheep would make! The first grasp of language for a child or baby is to imitate the sounds or noises that animals make - onomatopoeia (words sound like their meaning e.g. baa baa in "Baa, baa black sheep"). In some of the earlier versions of "Baa, baa black sheep" the title is actually given as "Ba, ba black sheep" - it is difficult to spell sounds!

The History and Origins of Baa Baa Black Sheep Nursery Rhyme
The wool industry was critical to the country's economy from the Middle Ages until the nineteenth century so it is therefore not surprising that it is celebrated in the Baa Baa Black Sheep Nursery Rhyme. An historical connection for this rhyme has been suggested - a political satire said to refer to the Plantagenet King Edward I (the Master) and the the export tax imposed in Britain in 1275 in which the English Customs Statute authorised the king to collect a tax on all exports of wool in every port in the country.

But our further research indicates another possible connection of this Nursery rhyme to English history relating to King Edward II (1307-1327). The best wool in Europe was produced in England but the cloth workers from Flanders, Bruges and Lille were better skilled in the complex finishing trades such as dying and fulling (cleansing, shrinking, and thickening the cloth). King Edward II encouraged Flemmish weavers and cloth dyers to improve the quality of the final English products.

Baa baa black sheep, have you any wool?
Yes sir, yes sir, three bags full!
One for the master, one for the dame,
And one for the little boy who lives down the lane.
Electrolux

UK

#4 Feb 26, 2011
Neville Thompson wrote:
<quoted text>
I came to see the void, and yeah well,nothing much different so too-roo
Is there an echo in your head permanently, oxymoron?

That's a sure sign of a vacuum in it.

“Free Speech in a Free World ”

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#5 Feb 26, 2011
Clench wrote:
Baa Baa Black Sheep Rhyme
"Baa, baa black sheep" Nursery Rhyme History
Educational reasons for the poem "Baa, baa black sheep"poem
The reason to the words and history to this song were to associate wool and wool products with the animal that produces it, not to mention the sound that a sheep would make! The first grasp of language for a child or baby is to imitate the sounds or noises that animals make - onomatopoeia (words sound like their meaning e.g. baa baa in "Baa, baa black sheep"). In some of the earlier versions of "Baa, baa black sheep" the title is actually given as "Ba, ba black sheep" - it is difficult to spell sounds!
The History and Origins of Baa Baa Black Sheep Nursery Rhyme
The wool industry was critical to the country's economy from the Middle Ages until the nineteenth century so it is therefore not surprising that it is celebrated in the Baa Baa Black Sheep Nursery Rhyme. An historical connection for this rhyme has been suggested - a political satire said to refer to the Plantagenet King Edward I (the Master) and the the export tax imposed in Britain in 1275 in which the English Customs Statute authorised the king to collect a tax on all exports of wool in every port in the country.
But our further research indicates another possible connection of this Nursery rhyme to English history relating to King Edward II (1307-1327). The best wool in Europe was produced in England but the cloth workers from Flanders, Bruges and Lille were better skilled in the complex finishing trades such as dying and fulling (cleansing, shrinking, and thickening the cloth). King Edward II encouraged Flemmish weavers and cloth dyers to improve the quality of the final English products.
Baa baa black sheep, have you any wool?
Yes sir, yes sir, three bags full!
One for the master, one for the dame,
And one for the little boy who lives down the lane.
Thankyou for your input

“Free Speech in a Free World ”

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#6 Feb 26, 2011
Electrolux wrote:
<quoted text>
Is there an echo in your head permanently, oxymoron?
That's a sure sign of a vacuum in it.
How do you know Hmmmm ?
Lancelot

Mckellar, Australia

#7 Feb 26, 2011
Why can't they just leave it alone.I cannot understand what it has to do with "political correctness"It sure does sound better than changing it to ba ba rainbow sheep.This is just another political correctness creeping into childrens nursery rhymes if you still recollect the hue and cry over the "Kookaburra sits on the old gum tree" issue.Whats next?
John

Australia

#8 Feb 26, 2011
What a load of socialist crap.
The nursery rhyme has nothing to do with slavery.
The loony left must be destroyed.

“We don't have to take it”

Since: Jun 08

WhereTFamI?

#9 Feb 26, 2011
WHEN IS THIS INSANITY GOING TO STOP?????

The Enid Blyton "Noddy" books were banned for supposedly have "homosexual undertones".
We couldn't say "blackboard" - but we can have "whiteboards".
Is that derogatory to 'white' people???
And the list goes on and on and on...
The Baa Baa Black Sheep thing was raised years ago but didn't come to anything.
And here we go again, on the same old PC bandwagon.

This stupidity is coming from Britain as usual - the most culturally/PC crippled western country and getting worse by the day.

Oh dear... can I say "crippled"? Would that word be insulting to the psychically challenged of society???
Elias

Australia

#10 Feb 26, 2011
It's not the words, they are harmless.

It's how they trigger imagery in the mind of children already exposed to racism from their parents, peers and siblings..

ksf

Since: Aug 07

Hawthorn, Australia

#11 Feb 26, 2011
Elias wrote:
It's not the words, they are harmless.
It's how they trigger imagery in the mind of children already exposed to racism from their parents, peers and siblings..
How is a child going to associate a black sheep with black people?
Night is dark, but there is no link to dark people.
If you get a black eye, should we be calling it a "rainbow eye".
just seems like more pc crap

“We don't have to take it”

Since: Jun 08

WhereTFamI?

#12 Feb 26, 2011
Elias wrote:
It's not the words, they are harmless.
It's how they trigger imagery in the mind of children already exposed to racism from their parents, peers and siblings..
Christ almighty give me strength!!!

Ok Elias, how about we just obliterate the word "black" AND the colour "black" altogether from everything? No more "black" words, no more "black" colour - let's make it a criminal word with a minimum jail sentence of 10 years if it's uttered, or if any "black" clothing is worn. Let's then just pretend that it never existed hey? Would that make you happy?????

But to be fair an equal with this - we would have to obliterate the "white" word as well don't you think? No more "white" Christmas, no more "white" sheep, no more "white" clouds, no more "white" anything.....

ffs!!!!!
John

Australia

#13 Feb 26, 2011
Elias wrote:
It's not the words, they are harmless.
It's how they trigger imagery in the mind of children already exposed to racism from their parents, peers and siblings..
Can you imagine the violent imagery triggered in the minds of real Australians by the droning bullshit of wog parasites like you?

“We don't have to take it”

Since: Jun 08

WhereTFamI?

#14 Feb 26, 2011
Elias wrote:
It's not the words, they are harmless.
It's how they trigger imagery in the mind of children already exposed to racism from their parents, peers and siblings..
I've got an idea! How about we change tactics to ban the burqa? Perhaps we could say it psychologically harms little children? Just imagine a BLACK flapping sheet with eyes bearing down on you in a shopping center. How scary is that imagery?

Since: Nov 10

Perth, Australia

#15 Feb 26, 2011
It's only just happening in Queensland now.It happened in W.A years ago.It's just more pc madness.how sad it is to see our once proud country turning into a joke.
Monster

Sydney, Australia

#16 Feb 26, 2011
Elias wrote:
It's not the words, they are harmless.
It's how they trigger imagery in the mind of children already exposed to racism from their parents, peers and siblings..
Says the fuckwit who says we should tolerate Islam!! LMFAO!!
SKG

Nollamara, Australia

#17 Feb 26, 2011
Gottaliv wrote:
<quoted text>
Christ almighty give me strength!!!
Ok Elias, how about we just obliterate the word "black" AND the colour "black" altogether from everything? No more "black" words, no more "black" colour - let's make it a criminal word with a minimum jail sentence of 10 years if it's uttered, or if any "black" clothing is worn. Let's then just pretend that it never existed hey? Would that make you happy?????
But to be fair an equal with this - we would have to obliterate the "white" word as well don't you think? No more "white" Christmas, no more "white" sheep, no more "white" clouds, no more "white" anything.....
ffs!!!!!
You are not giving Elias a right to view his oppinion. Personallly I don't care if children are taught Ba Ba black sheep but to suggest that the English language is not designed to oppress dark skinned people then think why do we call people black and other people white..

Have a look everything that is bad is referred to as black in the dictionary

black&#8194; &#8194;
[blak] Show IPA
adjective,-er,-est, noun, verb, adverb
–adjective
1.
lacking hue and brightness; absorbing light without reflecting any of the rays composing it.
2.
characterized by absence of light; enveloped in darkness: a black night.
3.
( sometimes initial capital letter )
a.
pertaining or belonging to any of the various populations characterized by dark skin pigmentation, specifically the dark-skinned peoples of Africa, Oceania, and australia.
b.
African-American.
4.
soiled or stained with dirt: That shirt was black within an hour.
5.
gloomy; pessimistic; dismal: a black outlook.
6.
deliberately; harmful; inexcusable: a black lie.
7.
boding ill; sullen or hostile; threatening: black words; black looks.
8.
(of coffee or tea) without milk or cream.
9.
without any moral quality or goodness; evil; wicked: His black heart has concocted yet another black deed.
10.
indicating censure, disgrace, or liability to punishment: a black mark on one's record.
11.
marked by disaster or misfortune: black areas of drought; Black Friday.
12.
wearing black or dark clothing or armor: the black prince.
13.
based on the grotesque, morbid, or unpleasant aspects of life: black comedy; black humor.
14.
(of a check mark, flag, etc.) done or written in black to indicate, as on a list, that which is undesirable, sub-standard, potentially dangerous, etc.: Pilots put a black flag next to the ten most dangerous airports.
15.
illegal or underground: The black economy pays no taxes.
16.
showing a profit; not showing any losses: the first black quarter in two years.
17.
deliberately false or intentionally misleading: black propaganda.
18.
British . boycotted, as certain goods or products by a trade union.
19.
(of steel) in the form in which it comes from the rolling mill or forge; unfinished.

Now look at white

white&#8194; &#8194;
[hwahyt, wahyt] Show IPA
adjective, whit·er, whit·est, noun, verb, whit·ed, whit·ing.
–adjective
1.
of the color of pure snow, of the margins of this page, etc.; reflecting nearly all the rays of sunlight or a similar light.
2.
light or comparatively light in color.
3.
(of human beings) marked by slight pigmentation of the skin, as of many Caucasoids.
4.
for, limited to, or predominantly made up of persons whose racial heritage is Caucasian: a white club; a white neighborhood.
5.
pallid or pale, as from fear or other strong emotion: white with rage.
6.
silvery, gray, or hoary: white hair.
7.
snowy: a white Christmas.
8.
lacking color; transparent.
9.
(politically) ultraconservative.
10.
blank, as an unoccupied space in printed matter: Fill in the white space below.
11.
Armor . composed entirely of polished steel plates without fabric or other covering; alwite.
12.
wearing white clothing: a white monk.
13.
Slang . decent, honorable, or dependable: That's very white of you.
14.
auspicious or fortunate.
15.
morally pure; innocent.
16.
without malice; harmless: white magic.
Monster

Sydney, Australia

#18 Feb 26, 2011
Gottaliv wrote:
<quoted text>
I've got an idea! How about we change tactics to ban the burqa? Perhaps we could say it psychologically harms little children? Just imagine a BLACK flapping sheet with eyes bearing down on you in a shopping center. How scary is that imagery?
We've got muslims preaching their shit in this country and people want to ban Baa Baa Black Sheep!!?!?!! Fuxake!
SKG

Nollamara, Australia

#19 Feb 26, 2011
Gottaliv wrote:
<quoted text>
I've got an idea! How about we change tactics to ban the burqa? Perhaps we could say it psychologically harms little children? Just imagine a BLACK flapping sheet with eyes bearing down on you in a shopping center. How scary is that imagery?
Thats his point. The reason you call people Blacks or black people is because it attaches a negative image to a group of people.

You just proved Ellias is right!

“Free Speech in a Free World ”

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#20 Feb 26, 2011
Gottaliv wrote:
<quoted text>
I've got an idea! How about we change tactics to ban the burqa? Perhaps we could say it psychologically harms little children? Just imagine a BLACK flapping sheet with eyes bearing down on you in a shopping center. How scary is that imagery?
Yeah,I reckon that would be really scary.
Can't have that.
How about all the cross dressers,and the drag Queens seeing their actions are illegal so why aren't burqua's,that's discrimination which can lead to court action.

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