Poetry In The Trenches

Dec 9, 2012 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: The Daily Beast

In an interview, Faith Barrett, who describes the Civil War as a "poetry-fueled war," points to the way verse was inextricably connected to the way Americans experienced the crisis of the house divided: Poetry in mid-19th-century America was ubiquitous in a way that it just isn't now.

Comments

Showing posts 1 - 2 of2

“Shadowville All-Stars”

Since: Dec 08

Columbus, GA

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#1
Dec 9, 2012
 
Fascinating times, from Henry Timrod through Edgar Allen Poe.

“Shadowville All-Stars”

Since: Dec 08

Columbus, GA

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2
Dec 12, 2012
 
On Wednesday, December 12, 2012 7:53:41 AM UTC-5, Hieronymous707 wrote:
> The poets and places mentioned in the poem are obvious, and equally obviously they are intentionally obscured in the text by the writer of the poem. Shadowville represents the ghost world of poets past that is present in your mind as you read them. Shadowville is where dead poets come back to life.

If I ever make it up to Perryville (actually talked with Brother Dave about it yesterday, and maybe in a decade or two we can make it, more or less, would like to sooner but that may not be possible given recent situations) I'd like to attempt a short film based on the route shown in your video, perhaps the footage you've already shot would work, with Civil War era poets read over the footage, Henry Timrod, and others.

Dig this:

http://andrewsullivan.thedailybeast.com/2012/...

In an interview, Faith Barrett, who describes the Civil War as a “poetry-fueled war,” points to the way verse was inextricably connected to the way Americans experienced the crisis of the house divided:

Poetry in mid-19th-century America was ubiquitous in a way that it just isn’t now. It was everywhere in newspapers and magazines, children were learning it in school… Americans were encountering poetry on a weekly basis, if not a daily basis, in the Civil War era, and that’s a profound difference from contemporary poetry and its place in our culture.

There are so many accounts in newspapers of soldiers dying with a poem in their pockets, poems written on a scrap of paper folded up inside a book; so many accounts of songs or poems being sung or read to political leaders at particular moments. For example, after Lincoln announced the second call for a draft ... James Sloan Gibbons wrote this song poem called “Three Hundred Thousand More,” which he supposedly sang to Lincoln in his office one day. So there’s a kind of immediacy of impact, that poetry is actually, I suggest, shaping events, not just responding or reflecting on them.

Tell me when this thread is updated: (Registration is not required)

Add to my Tracker Send me an email

Showing posts 1 - 2 of2
Type in your comments below
Name
(appears on your post)
Comments
Characters left: 4000
Type the numbers you see in the image on the right:

Please note by clicking on "Post Comment" you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Other Recent Poetry Discussions

Search the Poetry Forum:
Topic Updated Last By Comments
Remembering Herman Taube, Witness to a Vanished... Apr 11 Naomi Katz 1
New Book by American Poet Norbert Krapf is Rele... Apr 9 Ed Stenftenagel 1
On Tap: Antioch High School students featured a... Apr 4 rockfish hunter 1
i wrote this poem for my boyfriend. what do u t... (Aug '07) Mar 31 Colorfull 409
What Was Rumi Talking About? Mar 30 Mawar 2
The Large Moose: Red Rite Mar 26 Abishai100 1
Ocean's 12: How America's Hip-Hop generation ma... (Jul '12) Mar 25 Big Knob 6
•••
•••
•••
•••