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Abishai100

Clementon, NJ

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#1
Dec 29, 2012
 
John Keats was a great English poet who wrote an expressive poem titled "Ode to Psyche" in the spring of 1819.

This unusually lyrical poem celebrated the strange allegorical combination of mythology and everyday simplicity.

Keats decided to combine themes regarding the love God Cupid with the hauntingly memorable qualities of the ambitious human psyche.

Here is a poignant excerpt from "Ode to Psyche" (1819):

And in the midst of this wide quietness
A rosy sanctuary will I dress
With the wreathed trellis of a working brain,
With buds, and bells, and stars without a name,
With all the gardener Fancy e'er could feign,
Who breeding flowers, will never breed the same:
And there shall be for thee all soft delight
That shadowy thought can win,
A bright torch, and a casement ope at night,
To let the warm Love in!(Lines 58-67)

This loud excerpt suggests that Keats wished to relate romance with impatience, a mood-complex achievement that perhaps humanistically reflects the vernacular value of value hype-themed Hollywood (USA) movies such as "Fried Green Tomatoes" (1991).

Are they printing movie posters on hemp/recycled paper yet?

God bless!

“Shadowville All-Stars”

Since: Dec 08

Columbus, GA

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#3
Jan 12, 2013
 
Abishai100 wrote:
John Keats was a great English poet who wrote an expressive poem titled "Ode to Psyche" in the spring of 1819.
This unusually lyrical poem celebrated the strange allegorical combination of mythology and everyday simplicity.
Keats decided to combine themes regarding the love God Cupid with the hauntingly memorable qualities of the ambitious human psyche.
Here is a poignant excerpt from "Ode to Psyche" (1819):
And in the midst of this wide quietness
A rosy sanctuary will I dress
With the wreathed trellis of a working brain,
With buds, and bells, and stars without a name,
With all the gardener Fancy e'er could feign,
Who breeding flowers, will never breed the same:
And there shall be for thee all soft delight
That shadowy thought can win,
A bright torch, and a casement ope at night,
To let the warm Love in!(Lines 58-67)
This loud excerpt suggests that Keats wished to relate romance with impatience, a mood-complex achievement that perhaps humanistically reflects the vernacular value of value hype-themed Hollywood (USA) movies such as "Fried Green Tomatoes" (1991).
Are they printing movie posters on hemp/recycled paper yet?
God bless!
Excellent, thanks for posting!

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