Inmate dies at Warren County Jail

Inmate dies at Warren County Jail

There are 28 comments on the WNYT Albany story from Jun 10, 2009, titled Inmate dies at Warren County Jail. In it, WNYT Albany reports that:

A 26-year-old Saranac Lake man being held in Warren County Jail on an assault charge has died from an apparent seizure.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at WNYT Albany.

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rushme

Ghent, NY

#1 Jun 15, 2009
officers must remember electric shocks done on suspects could kill a possible innocent citizen.
confused

Saratoga Springs, NY

#2 Jun 15, 2009
What do you mean rushme? You lost me. What electric shocks and what innocent citizen?

Since: Oct 08

Troy, NY

#3 Jun 15, 2009
rushme wrote:
officers must remember electric shocks done on suspects could kill a possible innocent citizen.
You know, most people would bother actually reading the story before commenting on it. The inmate had a seizure, could have been an eplileptic off his meds or a drug addict going through withdrawal who had an undiagnosed condition.

Medical staffing at county jails is a joke and I believe the inmate's chances to survive the seizure are better on the outside, but that's the nature of prisons. Corrections is the profession of last resort, especially for medical personnel.
Devvy

Saratoga Springs, NY

#4 Jun 15, 2009
Well Gruber there are medical staff on at the prisons. I know Registered Nurses work there. However, they can get the same pay and are safer in the hospitals.

As far as medical staff goes they are only as good as the history given them. Most do not disclose their drug habit. And if they do they sugar coat it. Not to mention there are just as many drugs snuck in the prisons as are out on the street. So lets see what his actual autopsy states.

They did try to revive him. But if he was in withdrawal and no meds were available to give him it wouldnt have mattered anyway. They tried.

Lets face it were he innocent more than likely he wouldnt have been there in the first place. Right?
Guards

Queensbury, NY

#5 Jun 24, 2009
Gruber wrote:
<quoted text>
You know, most people would bother actually reading the story before commenting on it. The inmate had a seizure, could have been an eplileptic off his meds or a drug addict going through withdrawal who had an undiagnosed condition.
Medical staffing at county jails is a joke and I believe the inmate's chances to survive the seizure are better on the outside, but that's the nature of prisons. Corrections is the profession of last resort, especially for medical personnel.
"Profession of last resort". Get a clue!!! I, like many other correction officers have a 4 year degree, but chose corrections for job security and the benefits. If your going to make a comment, please have a clue about what your saying. As far as the nursing staff, I saw first hand a nurse save two lives in two seperate incidents in a matter of 3 days. How many lives have you saved? Nurses get the least recognition for the work they do.
Robert

Apo, AE

#6 Jul 21, 2009
Guards and nurses in the Corrections System are well-qualified individuals who perform tough, important work. Although job security is good, it takes a high level of fortitude and discipline for them to perform their duties day after day. They expose themselves to danger everyday and help the inmates. Folks like 'Gruber' should just thank 'Guards' instead of degrading themselves with ignorant comments.
eieio

Albany, NY

#7 Jul 21, 2009
Gruber wrote:
<quoted text>
You know, most people would bother actually reading the story before commenting on it. The inmate had a seizure, could have been an eplileptic off his meds or a drug addict going through withdrawal who had an undiagnosed condition.
Medical staffing at county jails is a joke and I believe the inmate's chances to survive the seizure are better on the outside, but that's the nature of prisons. Corrections is the profession of last resort, especially for medical personnel.
Medical staff at correctional facilityes are NOT a joke, they are way under paid for putting there lives on the line, believe me I know, I work for a facility and see this

Since: Oct 08

Troy, NY

#8 Jul 21, 2009
Guards wrote:
<quoted text>"Profession of last resort". Get a clue!!! I, like many other correction officers have a 4 year degree, but chose corrections for job security and the benefits. If your going to make a comment, please have a clue about what your saying. As far as the nursing staff, I saw first hand a nurse save two lives in two seperate incidents in a matter of 3 days. How many lives have you saved? Nurses get the least recognition for the work they do.
I have a better idea about what I speak than any of you. I've worked in both state correctional facilities and county jails five local counties. I can say with complete confidence and assurance that every medical personal I've met at every facility was under qualified, under educated, and unmotivated.

I've seen first hand diabetics go untreated, nurses ignore inmates whose crimes they personally felt deserved more "punishment" etc. I have rarely seen such a complete lack of interest in medical care as I have seen in prison/jail medical personal. They all hate working in corrections and all wish they were working else. And I am quite sure more lives have been lost in state and county correctional facilities then have been saved.

Prison medical services is indeed a profession of last resort for people who simply get get a better job anywhere else. You may have a four-year degree, but guards don't and the lack of education is plainly apparent.

If you have a four-year degree and choose that corrections simply for job security and benefits then you gave up looking for a career and settled for a paycheck and that's exactly what's wrong with corrections.

Since: Oct 08

Troy, NY

#9 Jul 21, 2009
To amend my last post: I meant tow rite but MOST guards don't [have a four-year degree] and the lack of education is plainly apparent. [only a HS dipolma is required]
Guards

Queensbury, NY

#10 Jul 22, 2009
Once again, you don't have a clue! I enjoy working at the correctional facility and for you to say most officers are uneducated is a bunch of cra*. I would say more than 75% of the officers have a 4 year degree and 85% have at least a 2 year degree. You say that you worked at all these local facilities and state facilities, were you let go because you thought you were better than others? Probably! Remember this, these same uneducated individuals that you're talking about are the same ones protecting you when you walk down the hallways of the jail. As far as knowing what you're talking about, you don't. You don't have a clue.
Gruber wrote:
<quoted text>
I have a better idea about what I speak than any of you. I've worked in both state correctional facilities and county jails five local counties. I can say with complete confidence and assurance that every medical personal I've met at every facility was under qualified, under educated, and unmotivated.
I've seen first hand diabetics go untreated, nurses ignore inmates whose crimes they personally felt deserved more "punishment" etc. I have rarely seen such a complete lack of interest in medical care as I have seen in prison/jail medical personal. They all hate working in corrections and all wish they were working else. And I am quite sure more lives have been lost in state and county correctional facilities then have been saved.
Prison medical services is indeed a profession of last resort for people who simply get get a better job anywhere else. You may have a four-year degree, but guards don't and the lack of education is plainly apparent.
If you have a four-year degree and choose that corrections simply for job security and benefits then you gave up looking for a career and settled for a paycheck and that's exactly what's wrong with corrections.

“I am the HBIC”

Since: Jun 08

Troy, NY

#11 Jul 22, 2009
Gruber wrote:
<quoted text>
I have a better idea about what I speak than any of you. I've worked in both state correctional facilities and county jails five local counties. I can say with complete confidence and assurance that every medical personal I've met at every facility was under qualified, under educated, and unmotivated.
I've seen first hand diabetics go untreated, nurses ignore inmates whose crimes they personally felt deserved more "punishment" etc. I have rarely seen such a complete lack of interest in medical care as I have seen in prison/jail medical personal. They all hate working in corrections and all wish they were working else. And I am quite sure more lives have been lost in state and county correctional facilities then have been saved.
Prison medical services is indeed a profession of last resort for people who simply get get a better job anywhere else. You may have a four-year degree, but guards don't and the lack of education is plainly apparent.
If you have a four-year degree and choose that corrections simply for job security and benefits then you gave up looking for a career and settled for a paycheck and that's exactly what's wrong with corrections.
I agree with you Gruber, know a person who fell in RCJ and broke their elbow and had to wait 2 days before being brought to the ER adn was denied even Tylenol for pain, there was a lawsuit settled out of court, person was told they were not injured and over reacting untul their lawyer stepped in and demanded an ER visit low and behold the elbow was broken requiring surgery
bord

Crown Point, NY

#12 Oct 15, 2009
well gruber, i have 22 years in the system, guys like me, know about guys like, you thanks for not being there now, but then again, you never were,
corrections officer

Crown Point, NY

#13 Oct 15, 2009
please, don't call us guards,and we do the best we can with what you send us LOL
guards

Schenectady, NY

#14 Oct 25, 2009
another one bites the dust!
guards

Schenectady, NY

#15 Oct 25, 2009
eieio wrote:
<quoted text>
Medical staff at correctional facilityes are NOT a joke, they are way under paid for putting there lives on the line, believe me I know, I work for a facility and see this
Not that statement is a joke!
Dostoyevsky

Astoria, NY

#16 Oct 29, 2009
Some C.O.s are nice competant people, some aren't. Some nurses are well educated and went through good programs, some just barely graduated. It's not so much the level of education that matters, it is the demeanor and amount of care, commitment, inate intelligence and understanding one has that makes all the difference. It is highly ulikely and unecessary that 75% of corrections officers in any given area would have 4 year degrees. Medical care in correctional facilities is generally delayed unless a severe emergency is perceived and it is often difficult to obtain care because adequate medical staff is not present at certain hours and the staff that is available is not authorized to prescribe treatment beyond Tylenol or bacitracin ointment. Plus, due to the troublemaking nature of some inmates who fake illness and exagerate injuries, those who are truly in need are often brushed aside and not made a priority. It is a difficult situation especially in a situation where an inmate thinks they may be having heart trouble or something, it could be gas pain, anxiety, or any number of things. Hopefully if it is something serious an unbiased, competant, healthcare professional is available to detect a real problem. It is not up to the inmate to take himself to the ER and he can't call 911. The medical system is a potential avenue of abuse for hypochondriacal, oppositionally defiant, or otherwise mentally disturbed, incarcerated individuals. Judgement calls must be made and therefore errors will also be made. I believe that there should be a standardized and timely procedure for inmates who have not been abusing the system to receive direct care from a physician who has a vested interest in dignosing and treating as best as possible that individual. Just as there are no acurate blanket statements about the abilities of a class of corrections worker there should be no blanket limitations to the quality of healthcare available to prisoners. These are after all "correctional" facilities. Why then should these facillities further the decay of individualls by denying adequate and timely access to quality healthcare? Inadequate and downright shoddy dental care is extremely prevalent in so called correctional facilities. Most inmates will avoid it even as they develop secondary complications like abcesses that can cause a host of I'll health effects and often eventually require more agressive and costly healthcare treatments. It is unfortunate that both the issue of correctional healthcare and especially that of correctional dentistry are genaraly politicaly unpopular due to a perceived lack of public sympathy for inmates. It is often seen as poor electoral strategy to promote inmate issues and; therefore, with no one to advocate for inmate programs, budget constraints abound and inmate needs go unmet. It is true that there are altruists in correctional healthcare. It is also true that as a job offering typically lower pay, worse conditions, restricted treatment options for patients, and the immediate qualification that you will be treating mostly criminals, it is not often the job of choice for the most ambitious and qualified professionals. So it is no secret that correctional facilities offer inferior healthcare which can be hazzardous and deadly at worst and generally lacking in timeliness and care quality at best. At this point we can only hope that those people who have dedicated their profession to providing a service to inmates will do that to the best of their ability within the constraints they are forced to opperate within at this point in time. "The degree of civilzation in a society can be judged by entering its prisons."-Dostoyevsky
guards

Schenectady, NY

#17 Oct 29, 2009
These convicts receive better heath care then those on the streets without insurance. Boo [email protected]@ Boo for the convict! If you can't do the time stay out of jail. As far as medical; staff, most are a bunch of idiots who could not make it on the streets or in a real hospital. They seem to be more concerned about who tey are going to have an affair with.
rushme

Chatham, NY

#18 Oct 29, 2009
seizures show lack of medication, who was his correction officer? any inmate has a medical history sheet when booked.
deal with it

Schenectady, NY

#19 Oct 29, 2009
rushme wrote:
seizures show lack of medication, who was his correction officer? any inmate has a medical history sheet when booked.
ok sparky.... officers are not aware of "medical histories" are you familiar with HIPA laws? If a con wants "sick call" they are sent. Officers are not medically trained. Convicts are never denied sick call. Of course half of the time they go it is just to see a woman. Many times nursing staff are the only regular contact they can get with a female.
1 down more 2 go

New York, NY

#20 Oct 29, 2009
who cares?

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