Beatles versus the Stones: Who 's bet...

Beatles versus the Stones: Who 's better?

There are 211 comments on the Los Angeles Times story from Jan 24, 2012, titled Beatles versus the Stones: Who 's better?. In it, Los Angeles Times reports that:

Beatles versus the Stones: Who's better?What about MJ versus Prince? These and other pop music debates are settled.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Los Angeles Times.

Bubba

Renton, WA

#105 Aug 23, 2012
Will Dockery wrote:
<quoted text>
Absolutely... and changed the face and sound of American music also.
Very true Will . I remember the American groups growing their hair out and trying to look like the Beatles. Beau Brummels and many others copied the mod clothes.

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#106 Aug 23, 2012
Bubba wrote:
<quoted text>Very true Will . I remember the American groups growing their hair out and trying to look like the Beatles. Beau Brummels and many others copied the mod clothes.
Like The Knickerbockers or The Monkees?

It always happens when a certain fad comes around, others copy it.

But then something new catches on and that is suddenly popular...

Look what happened to the hair bands when Nirvana first came out.

All of them were dropped by their labels and disappeared.

Like or not, the core of the British Invasion was short lived.

Only the truly talented bands remained.

The Beatles
The Rolling Stones
The Who
The Kinks
The Yardbirds (Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, Jimmy Page)

Flamin Groovies were a US band that updated the sound in 1976-1979.

The Groovies second wave sounded like a lost sixties band.

But they had their roots in rockabilly and punk.

The cult classics "Teenage Head" and "Flamingo" in the early 70's.

ononothimagin

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#107 Aug 24, 2012
I agree with your list of British Invasion bands but I would add the Animals too. Naturally, they were other great British band from the sixties that didn't exactly invade America but were "Top of the Pops" in England,

Other bands I liked included:

The Move
The Spencer-Davis Group
Savoy Brown
The Zombies
The Pretty Things
The Small Faces
The Moody Blues
Them (With Van Morrison)

While bands like the Move and Savoy Brown were influential on other British bands, none of these guys had the impact the bands you mentioned did in America.(With the exception of the Moody Blues, who had several hits in the states but were mostly just following what the Beatles were doing.) Strangely, as terrifically talented as the Kinks and the Yardbirds were, they never really caught on in the USA either. The reason the Kinks didn't is obvious, they were too British for American tastes but the Yardbirds evolved into Led Zeppelin, who were monsterously popular in the following decade. The Yardbirds were both ahead and behind the times. The were heavily immersed in the Blues but made the mistake of trying to play it the way the old Blues musicians did. It wasn't until Led Zeppelin amped it up did the Blues become more listenable to youthful ears. The Stones recorded several Blues songs too but none of them were hits. Songs like "I Can't Get No (Satisfaction") is what made them big. It's as if The Beatles knew America wasn't ready for the Blues yet. With all the different genres of music they dabbled in, they never did record a old Blues song, like "Little Red Rooster." They played around with Motown and Rockabilly but left the Blues alone.
Bubba

Renton, WA

#108 Aug 24, 2012
ononothimagin wrote:
I agree with your list of British Invasion bands but I would add the Animals too. Naturally, they were other great British band from the sixties that didn't exactly invade America but were "Top of the Pops" in England,
Other bands I liked included:
The Move
The Spencer-Davis Group
Savoy Brown
The Zombies
The Pretty Things
The Small Faces
The Moody Blues
Them (With Van Morrison)
While bands like the Move and Savoy Brown were influential on other British bands, none of these guys had the impact the bands you mentioned did in America.(With the exception of the Moody Blues, who had several hits in the states but were mostly just following what the Beatles were doing.) Strangely, as terrifically talented as the Kinks and the Yardbirds were, they never really caught on in the USA either. The reason the Kinks didn't is obvious, they were too British for American tastes but the Yardbirds evolved into Led Zeppelin, who were monsterously popular in the following decade. The Yardbirds were both ahead and behind the times. The were heavily immersed in the Blues but made the mistake of trying to play it the way the old Blues musicians did. It wasn't until Led Zeppelin amped it up did the Blues become more listenable to youthful ears. The Stones recorded several Blues songs too but none of them were hits. Songs like "I Can't Get No (Satisfaction") is what made them big. It's as if The Beatles knew America wasn't ready for the Blues yet. With all the different genres of music they dabbled in, they never did record a old Blues song, like "Little Red Rooster." They played around with Motown and Rockabilly but left the Blues alone.
Good explanation Right on and true indeed.

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#109 Aug 24, 2012
ononothimagin wrote:
I agree with your list of British Invasion bands but I would add the Animals too. Naturally, they were other great British band from the sixties that didn't exactly invade America but were "Top of the Pops" in England,
Other bands I liked included:
The Move
The Spencer-Davis Group
Savoy Brown
The Zombies
The Pretty Things
The Small Faces
The Moody Blues
Them (With Van Morrison)
While bands like the Move and Savoy Brown were influential on other British bands, none of these guys had the impact the bands you mentioned did in America.(With the exception of the Moody Blues, who had several hits in the states but were mostly just following what the Beatles were doing.) Strangely, as terrifically talented as the Kinks and the Yardbirds were, they never really caught on in the USA either. The reason the Kinks didn't is obvious, they were too British for American tastes but the Yardbirds evolved into Led Zeppelin, who were monsterously popular in the following decade. The Yardbirds were both ahead and behind the times. The were heavily immersed in the Blues but made the mistake of trying to play it the way the old Blues musicians did. It wasn't until Led Zeppelin amped it up did the Blues become more listenable to youthful ears. The Stones recorded several Blues songs too but none of them were hits. Songs like "I Can't Get No (Satisfaction") is what made them big. It's as if The Beatles knew America wasn't ready for the Blues yet. With all the different genres of music they dabbled in, they never did record a old Blues song, like "Little Red Rooster." They played around with Motown and Rockabilly but left the Blues alone.
The Kinks were very popular in the early eighties.

My sister had The Kinks "Give The People What They Want" album.

It helped that Van Halen covered a few of their classics.

I was a Led Zeppelin freak.

If fact, I tended to go for bluesy hard rock then.

I liked The Moody Blues short lived early eighties comeback.

The eighties were a very musical decade.

Great post, Kracker.

ononothimagin

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#110 Aug 24, 2012
Bubba wrote:
<quoted text>Good explanation Right on and true indeed.
I don't recall if you guys mentioned "The Move." Have you ever heard any of their stuff? Their chief asset was guitarist and songwriter Roy Wood, who combined a knack for Beatlesque pop with a peculiarly British, and occasionally morbid, sense of humor. On their final albums (with considerable input from Jeff Lynne), the band became artier and more ambitious, hinting at the orchestral rock that Wood and Lynne would devise for the Electric Light Orchestra. Roy Wood was a loon. His arrangements became dark, denser and more ambitious as time went on, particularly as Wood developed proficiency on a number of common and exotic instruments. They were a fascinating, yet largely unknown group from the 60s.

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#111 Aug 24, 2012
ononothimagin wrote:
<quoted text>
I don't recall if you guys mentioned "The Move." Have you ever heard any of their stuff? Their chief asset was guitarist and songwriter Roy Wood, who combined a knack for Beatlesque pop with a peculiarly British, and occasionally morbid, sense of humor. On their final albums (with considerable input from Jeff Lynne), the band became artier and more ambitious, hinting at the orchestral rock that Wood and Lynne would devise for the Electric Light Orchestra. Roy Wood was a loon. His arrangements became dark, denser and more ambitious as time went on, particularly as Wood developed proficiency on a number of common and exotic instruments. They were a fascinating, yet largely unknown group from the 60s.
I think the Flamin' Groovies covered The Move, "Move It"

I don't think I've ever heard of The Move on radio.

ononothimagin

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#112 Aug 24, 2012
octo wrote:
<quoted text>
The Kinks were very popular in the early eighties.
My sister had The Kinks "Give The People What They Want" album.
It helped that Van Halen covered a few of their classics.
I was a Led Zeppelin freak.
If fact, I tended to go for bluesy hard rock then.
I liked The Moody Blues short lived early eighties comeback.
The eighties were a very musical decade.
Great post, Kracker.
The Kinks have long been a group of interest to me. Even their early stuff was top quality. If you listen to their early albums, they naturally had strictly commercial songs,(Like mocking "Let's Spend The Night Together" in "David Watts") but Ray Davies was obviously an incredibly talented songwriter. Songs like "Dedicated Follower Of Fashion" was far to British for American taste but one of Davies' early examples of his sardonic wit that would serve him so well throughout their career. There were times when his sense of irony sounded a little bitchy in his writing,(like in "Shangra-La," off "Arthur") but his music was always fascinating. Songs like "Fancy" give me goosebumps.

ononothimagin

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#113 Aug 24, 2012
octo wrote:
<quoted text>
I think the Flamin' Groovies covered The Move, "Move It"
I don't think I've ever heard of The Move on radio.
The Move recorded "Do Ya" before Jeff Lynne re-recorded a better version of it with Electric Light Orchestra. Cheap Trick covered "California Man." Like Pink Floyd, not many groups are brave enough to cover their songs.

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#114 Aug 24, 2012
ononothimagin wrote:
<quoted text>
The Kinks have long been a group of interest to me. Even their early stuff was top quality. If you listen to their early albums, they naturally had strictly commercial songs,(Like mocking "Let's Spend The Night Together" in "David Watts") but Ray Davies was obviously an incredibly talented songwriter. Songs like "Dedicated Follower Of Fashion" was far to British for American taste but one of Davies' early examples of his sardonic wit that would serve him so well throughout their career. There were times when his sense of irony sounded a little bitchy in his writing,(like in "Shangra-La," off "Arthur") but his music was always fascinating. Songs like "Fancy" give me goosebumps.
I like The Kinks.

Their late seventies, early eighties stuff was very good.

They weren't as celebrated as The Who but they're legends.

Have you ever heard of The Flamin' Groovies?

Someone should make a rock n roll movie about their career.

Fascinating that they carried on yet never made the big time.

They belong in the rock n roll hall of fame.

They are one of the unsung heroes of rock history.

ononothimagin

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#115 Aug 24, 2012
octo wrote:
<quoted text>
I think the Flamin' Groovies covered The Move, "Move It"
I don't think I've ever heard of The Move on radio.
No, the Move was never played on the radio. They're kind of a musical secret. They're like Pink Floyd, where you can't get the full dimension of the band unless you listen to one of their albums.

Another band I love from the 60s was a group simply called, "Love," from Los Angeles. Robert Plant sites "Forever Changes" as one of his favorite albums of all time.

ononothimagin

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#116 Aug 24, 2012
octo wrote:
<quoted text>
I like The Kinks.
Their late seventies, early eighties stuff was very good.
They weren't as celebrated as The Who but they're legends.
Have you ever heard of The Flamin' Groovies?
Someone should make a rock n roll movie about their career.
Fascinating that they carried on yet never made the big time.
They belong in the rock n roll hall of fame.
They are one of the unsung heroes of rock history.
I've heard of them but don't know much about them. Were they British?

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#117 Aug 24, 2012
ononothimagin wrote:
<quoted text>
I've heard of them but don't know much about them. Were they British?
California born and bred.

Seriously, they started out in 1966.

They are hard to explain but their music still sounds fresh.

They did a lot of covers and original material.

"Teenage Head" is their masterpiece from 1971.

Jug band music, Folk, early Punk, Rockabilly and British invasion.

They could do the blues and surf instrumentals too.

Late 60's, early 70's cartoon teenage greaser music.

They changed lead singers and became late 70's British invasion.

"Shake Some Action" (1976) is a lost pop masterpiece.

I've actually heard "Heading For The Texas Border" on radio once.

It took me years to finally find out who they were.

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#118 Aug 24, 2012
ononothimagin wrote:
<quoted text>
No, the Move was never played on the radio. They're kind of a musical secret. They're like Pink Floyd, where you can't get the full dimension of the band unless you listen to one of their albums.
Another band I love from the 60s was a group simply called, "Love," from Los Angeles. Robert Plant sites "Forever Changes" as one of his favorite albums of all time.
You ever hear of Tangerine Dream?

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#119 Aug 24, 2012
ononothimagin wrote:
<quoted text>
No, the Move was never played on the radio. They're kind of a musical secret. They're like Pink Floyd, where you can't get the full dimension of the band unless you listen to one of their albums.
Another band I love from the 60s was a group simply called, "Love," from Los Angeles. Robert Plant sites "Forever Changes" as one of his favorite albums of all time.
There are a lot of lesser bands that never really made it.

I've heard of Love, Moby Grape, Spirit...

But it was never played so I never knew what they've done.

Spirit's "I Got A Line On You" was covered by Alice Cooper.
ChasUGC

Long Beach, CA

#120 Aug 25, 2012
Here we go again. The Los Angeles Times trying to create dissension and argument among people. This is just how the media works. They try to create a lot of shite to develop a story. Maybe they'll even induce a crazy Beatles fan to shot a Rolling Stones fan. Now, that would make a good headline, right? When will we ever learn to ignore such attempts? Why can't they just stick with the news and stop trying to create news? Everyone knows the media is a sick bunch of people trying to create mass hysteria, but we continually respond to them. What does that make us?
ChasUGC

Long Beach, CA

#121 Aug 25, 2012
Why can't we just say that the Beatles and the Rolling Stones were both great in their own rite?
And ignore these media attempts at frenzy?

They did it with Michael, calling him that moniker. And, look at the dissension and frenzy it has caused us here?

We can't have any decent discussions. We can't even be civil to each other. All because of hate induced by the media.

ononothimagin

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#122 Aug 25, 2012
octo wrote:
<quoted text>
You ever hear of Tangerine Dream?
Sure. They were a progressive rock band, similar to Gentle Giant and Camel.

I consider Spirit's first album (the one with "Fresh Garbage" on it.) one of the best psychedelic records ever made. It wasn't just spaced out rock, it was truly inspired.

ononothimagin

Since: Aug 12

Location hidden

#123 Aug 25, 2012
ChasUGC wrote:
Why can't we just say that the Beatles and the Rolling Stones were both great in their own rite?
And ignore these media attempts at frenzy?
They did it with Michael, calling him that moniker. And, look at the dissension and frenzy it has caused us here?
We can't have any decent discussions. We can't even be civil to each other. All because of hate induced by the media.
Gee, I didn't even detect a hateful tone in these posts until you got here.

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#124 Aug 25, 2012
ononothimagin wrote:
<quoted text>
Sure. They were a progressive rock band, similar to Gentle Giant and Camel.
I consider Spirit's first album (the one with "Fresh Garbage" on it.) one of the best psychedelic records ever made. It wasn't just spaced out rock, it was truly inspired.
Led Zeppelin covered "Fresh Garbage" on their first US tour in 1969.

I have a few worthwhile Zeppelin covers on soundboard.

They did their entire first album then kept going...

A few covers that Zeppelin played in 1969:

"Fresh Garbage"
"As Long As I Have You"
"Train Kept A Rollin"
"For Your Love"
"Sittin' And Thinkin'"
"Killing Floor"
"I'm A Man"
"The Hunter"
"Cadillac"
"No Money Down"

The Doors unreleased stuff is the best though.

Spirit sounds interesting...

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