150 Best Selling Artists in the World!

150 Best Selling Artists in the World!

There are 12898 comments on the talk.livedaily.com story from Dec 6, 2008, titled 150 Best Selling Artists in the World! . In it, talk.livedaily.com reports that:

This is a list of the top 150 worldwide best-selling music artists of all time. The measure is the total number of singles and albums sold world-widep, this info comes from the IFIP at the end of 2007. Michael Jackson is #2 with 350 million sold.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at talk.livedaily.com.

Octopus

Astoria, NY

#11590 Jun 14, 2013
Bubba wrote:
<quoted text>Dylan is a legend and one of the best poets of modern day.Too bad his son Jacob didn't last longer. The first album was good with the WallFlowers.
The same can be said to other rock kids, Bubba. None have ever reached the level of success of their famous fathers.
Bubba

Bothell, WA

#11591 Jun 14, 2013
Octopus wrote:
<quoted text>
The same can be said to other rock kids, Bubba. None have ever reached the level of success of their famous fathers.
Yeah Julian Lennon's first album was good but he went down hill after that. Dhani Harrison is talented but no where near what George could do on the guitar. Hank Williams Junior is a has been and never was the legend his father was.

“at yet more f'loonspin”

Since: Aug 11

I live far away from f'loons

#11593 Jun 14, 2013
Octopus wrote:
<quoted text>
Bob Dylan never had the perfect singing voice but what he did was made it possible for other artists to explore different areas within folk, country and blues to begin to create the folk rock sound from anyone from Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash, The Byrds, Tom Petty and even had his impact on The Beatles, Jimi Hendrix. Scores of rock, country and folk artists have recorded Bob Dylan. You can actually hear the progress Dylan made at his peak in the mid sixties on "The Best Of The Original Mono Recordings" which Dylan took the folk structure and invented the folk rock sound. The Beatles "Rubber Soul" would have not exsisted without Bob Dylan. Obviously, it was superior songcraft and lyrics of social change. Amazing, when you think about it. As a songwriter, Dylan went beyond anything else that came before him and made rock have a deeper message that meant something.
Ah, yes. Jimi Hendrix. I liked his cover of Bob Dylan's "All Along the Watchtower."
Octopus

Astoria, NY

#11594 Jun 14, 2013
Len is Disgusted wrote:
<quoted text>
Ah, yes. Jimi Hendrix. I liked his cover of Bob Dylan's "All Along the Watchtower."
Jimi Hendrix turned "All Along The Watchtower" into a masterpiece.
Bubba

Bothell, WA

#11595 Jun 14, 2013
The other day I heard a rare recording of Jimi Hendrix doing Day Tripper. I've never heard it before. It sounded like it was live.
xxxxx

Bridgend, UK

#11600 Jun 15, 2013
Radio Waves wrote:
<quoted text>
Well done, Carol.
Radio Waves,

You are mad as a fruit cake.
Octopus

Astoria, NY

#11604 Jun 16, 2013
Bubba wrote:
The other day I heard a rare recording of Jimi Hendrix doing Day Tripper. I've never heard it before. It sounded like it was live.
Jimi Hendrix was always playing and has a lot of rare unreleased recordings either done in the studio or live from the stage. I've never heard him do The Beatles "Day Tripper"
Octopus

Astoria, NY

#11605 Jun 16, 2013
King Elvis wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes, I have that Dylan CD, it's great. I actually prefer listening to mono recordings on my player and my iPod - it sounds more natural to me than stereo. It's a myth that humans hear in stereo - we don't. We hear in mono, and our ears simply divide the sound equally to our brain. Stereo splits the music into bass versus treble, and that's not how sound is naturally heard.
That's why I like the sound of the black leather '68 stuff from Elvis - all glorious mono, like his earliest recordings.
I might get the CBS stuff, because I don't have Rapid City as a complete show.
I've been to the Rapid City Convention Centre - it has giant banners of the artists who have played there, and the first one is Elvis. They're about 30 feet high. They also have ticket stubs on display and newspaper articles about the '77 show in frames on the wall. Very cool.
A really excellent sounding Las Vegas show was found years ago called, "Directly From The Hilton" 8-5-72 dinner show that is way better than the recent, "Stronger Than Pride" release. The old audience is cystal clear and almost sounds like it is a stereo recording but is somewhat brief. I like finding stuff like that. As the engagement went on though, the shows became longer like the 8-26-72 dinner. The Stamps Quartet did one solo spot called, "Walk That Lonesome Road" at that concert but Elvis did a lot more songs. Basically, I think the summer Vegas 1972 is more common than the previous winter as far as finding audience decent recordings. A friend of mine is ordering the next FTD, which I understand are two previously unrealesed soundboards from a 1974 road tour....
Wayne Blueflame

Bothell, WA

#11609 Jun 17, 2013
Radio Waves wrote:
<quoted text>
Well done, Carol.
Well I can see that you are ready for a couple more lit farts in the face. What's up with you? You can't seem to get enough of the Blueflames and your skin is blistered from the heat.
RICK

Midlothian, IL

#11610 Jun 17, 2013
As far as Bob Dylan is concerned,he's an OK singer but his real strength is his songwriting,and I really like such songs as `Positively 4th street',`Lay,lady,lay',`Tangle d up in blue',and others,but I agree with Octo that his voice is pretty well shot now,but then again,his voice was always an acquired taste.Hey Octo,I recently bought an interesting Elvis CD,`The Home recordings',it's just Elvis at home plucking his guitar and singing for fun on a home recording machine,but the gem on this CD by far is his recording of the song `Suppose',with only a piano backing by Charlie Hodge,this version is FAR superior to the inferior studio version,Elvis sings this home version with much more feeling,and this track alone makes this CD worth having,peace out.
RICK

Midlothian, IL

#11611 Jun 17, 2013
And I was thinking,do you think that Paul Mccartney has been reading what we've been saying on this site,and my criticisms of him in regards to his past comments on Elvis,because I find it to be more of a coincidence that a couple of weeks ago he visited Graceland while on tour and laid his guitar pick with his name on Elvis's grave,if he has,all I have to say is,don't be mad,Paul,you were part of the greatest pop group of all time,and you've had a very successful solo career as well,there doesn't need to be any animosity towards Elvis,the one major thing that links Elvis and The Beatles is you both made great Rock and Roll music,and you were BOTH beloved by the public,and I think you're a fine gentleman,peace to you.
Bubba

Bothell, WA

#11612 Jun 17, 2013
RICK wrote:
And I was thinking,do you think that Paul Mccartney has been reading what we've been saying on this site,and my criticisms of him in regards to his past comments on Elvis,because I find it to be more of a coincidence that a couple of weeks ago he visited Graceland while on tour and laid his guitar pick with his name on Elvis's grave,if he has,all I have to say is,don't be mad,Paul,you were part of the greatest pop group of all time,and you've had a very successful solo career as well,there doesn't need to be any animosity towards Elvis,the one major thing that links Elvis and The Beatles is you both made great Rock and Roll music,and you were BOTH beloved by the public,and I think you're a fine gentleman,peace to you.
Rick I doubt that Paul reads this but I have seen Julia Baird on the forums because of that dimwit Jane. Julia is cool and John's half sister.
Octopus

Astoria, NY

#11613 Jun 18, 2013
RICK wrote:
As far as Bob Dylan is concerned,he's an OK singer but his real strength is his songwriting,and I really like such songs as `Positively 4th street',`Lay,lady,lay',`Tangle d up in blue',and others,but I agree with Octo that his voice is pretty well shot now,but then again,his voice was always an acquired taste.Hey Octo,I recently bought an interesting Elvis CD,`The Home recordings',it's just Elvis at home plucking his guitar and singing for fun on a home recording machine,but the gem on this CD by far is his recording of the song `Suppose',with only a piano backing by Charlie Hodge,this version is FAR superior to the inferior studio version,Elvis sings this home version with much more feeling,and this track alone makes this CD worth having,peace out.
I've had RCA's "The Home Recordings" for years when it was first released along with FTD's "In A Private Moment" which came out afterwards. The 1966 recordings sound somewhat better on those two discs and what was interesting was Elvis doing folk songs like Dylan's "Blowin' In The Wind" and "500 Miles" They are not exactly superior studio recordings but did give an insight into what Elvis was thinking about recording around the time of "Spinout" and "Paradise, Hawaiian Style" I never really cared too much for the ballad, "Suppose" because the lyrics are somewhat lame. Elvis sounds quite bored on that one. "The Home Recordings" did contain some never released Elvis songs though. I was surprised that he didn't return to the studio to properly record some of the better material. Elvis was obviously searching for a different sound at that time and was testing a few things out at home. It reminds me of Charlie Hodge's later duet with Elvis, "Could I Fall In Love" from "Double Trouble" with Elvis trying his best with sub standard lyrics and songs.
Octopus

Astoria, NY

#11614 Jun 18, 2013
RICK wrote:
And I was thinking,do you think that Paul Mccartney has been reading what we've been saying on this site,and my criticisms of him in regards to his past comments on Elvis,because I find it to be more of a coincidence that a couple of weeks ago he visited Graceland while on tour and laid his guitar pick with his name on Elvis's grave,if he has,all I have to say is,don't be mad,Paul,you were part of the greatest pop group of all time,and you've had a very successful solo career as well,there doesn't need to be any animosity towards Elvis,the one major thing that links Elvis and The Beatles is you both made great Rock and Roll music,and you were BOTH beloved by the public,and I think you're a fine gentleman,peace to you.
I wish someone had recorded that historic meeting between Elvis & The Beatles in August of 1965. Obvious, they did jam together according to Paul when he put a guitar pick on Elvis's grave. George Harrison once mentioned that someone did have a tape recorder running. Perhaps, Tom Parker got his hands on it and destroyed the tapes. Pity. As I understand, Elvis was playing "I Feel Fine" on bass guitar and Paul McCartney was impressed. There was a brief talk between the col and Brian Epstein about Elvis & The Beatles possibly doing a film together but nothing was ever said again about the idea. It would have been nice to have photographs of the event but it remains lost in rock history. Tom Parker was an idiot for not keeping a historic record for us to enjoy. But that's the way it went.
Bubba

Bothell, WA

#11615 Jun 18, 2013
Octopus wrote:
<quoted text>
I wish someone had recorded that historic meeting between Elvis & The Beatles in August of 1965. Obvious, they did jam together according to Paul when he put a guitar pick on Elvis's grave. George Harrison once mentioned that someone did have a tape recorder running. Perhaps, Tom Parker got his hands on it and destroyed the tapes. Pity. As I understand, Elvis was playing "I Feel Fine" on bass guitar and Paul McCartney was impressed. There was a brief talk between the col and Brian Epstein about Elvis & The Beatles possibly doing a film together but nothing was ever said again about the idea. It would have been nice to have photographs of the event but it remains lost in rock history. Tom Parker was an idiot for not keeping a historic record for us to enjoy. But that's the way it went.
That would be priceless seeing Elvis play bass guitar while John sang I feel fine.I wonder if they played any of the songs that Elvis sang. Paul and John sure liked the early rock songs that Elvis did like HeartBreak Hotel and All Shook up. Tom Parker was Southern Redneck that knew how to promote Elvis but he wasn't the best negociater for Elvis.
King Elvis

Terrigal, Australia

#11616 Jun 18, 2013
Octopus wrote:
<quoted text>
It reminds me of Charlie Hodge's later duet with Elvis, "Could I Fall In Love" from "Double Trouble" with Elvis trying his best with sub standard lyrics and songs.
Octo, that was Elvis himself doing the harmony with his original vocal track, not Charlie.

It was reflective of the scene in the movie where his character Guy sings along with his single on the record player.

And the song is one of the better movie ballads, IMO.
Octopus

Astoria, NY

#11617 Jun 18, 2013
Bubba wrote:
<quoted text>That would be priceless seeing Elvis play bass guitar while John sang I feel fine.I wonder if they played any of the songs that Elvis sang. Paul and John sure liked the early rock songs that Elvis did like HeartBreak Hotel and All Shook up. Tom Parker was Southern Redneck that knew how to promote Elvis but he wasn't the best negociater for Elvis.
Tom Parker and Brian Epstein were playing cards in another room. I'm sure there were guys in the Memphis Mafia that saw the jam session take place but it is not clear what was covered or what exact songs were played. At some point, the guys did get into playing pool. Since tapes were never found from both ends, it is just a tragic mishap because I'd love to know what they jammed on and for how long. No one could find a guitar pick so I guess they did it with broken pieces of cardboard. Anyway, Paul remembers a television remote control that Elvis had for his TV and it was quite rare at the time to change the channels that way. Actually, Parker wasn't a redneck, he was Dutch. He was a carnie and a dogcatcher before managing Hank Snow and Eddie Arnold. Parker was quite an interesting character but he did not desire other people and artists getting involved with Elvis. He kept Elvis in the dark about certain things. However, I would've thought he'd keep a record of the famous meeting between Elvis and The Beatles but apparently not.
Octopus

Astoria, NY

#11618 Jun 18, 2013
King Elvis wrote:
<quoted text>
Octo, that was Elvis himself doing the harmony with his original vocal track, not Charlie.
It was reflective of the scene in the movie where his character Guy sings along with his single on the record player.
And the song is one of the better movie ballads, IMO.
As an Elvis fan, I always liked the soundtrack from "Double Trouble" but obviously, it came out too late to be anything but a standard Elvis movie and soundtrack. Had it been released just a couple years earlier, it would've been a bigger hit. Elvis seemed somewhat inspired with several of the tracks but it was 1967. It did have a British theme and except for the embarrassing "Old McDonald" it was fairly decent. "Long Legged Girl" (with a short dress on) is a very under rated Elvis song. The better ballads worked as well. I've read that it was Charlie that sang duet on "Could I Fall In Love" "City By Night" is probably the best track on the album.
Bubba

Bothell, WA

#11619 Jun 18, 2013
Octopus wrote:
<quoted text>
Tom Parker and Brian Epstein were playing cards in another room. I'm sure there were guys in the Memphis Mafia that saw the jam session take place but it is not clear what was covered or what exact songs were played. At some point, the guys did get into playing pool. Since tapes were never found from both ends, it is just a tragic mishap because I'd love to know what they jammed on and for how long. No one could find a guitar pick so I guess they did it with broken pieces of cardboard. Anyway, Paul remembers a television remote control that Elvis had for his TV and it was quite rare at the time to change the channels that way. Actually, Parker wasn't a redneck, he was Dutch. He was a carnie and a dogcatcher before managing Hank Snow and Eddie Arnold. Parker was quite an interesting character but he did not desire other people and artists getting involved with Elvis. He kept Elvis in the dark about certain things. However, I would've thought he'd keep a record of the famous meeting between Elvis and The Beatles but apparently not.
I didn't know he managed Hank Snow and Eddie Arnold. The cattle call song was popular in Amarillo Texas when I lived there. I thought it reminded me of yodeling Slim Whitman.
Octopus

Astoria, NY

#11620 Jun 18, 2013
Bubba wrote:
<quoted text>I didn't know he managed Hank Snow and Eddie Arnold. The cattle call song was popular in Amarillo Texas when I lived there. I thought it reminded me of yodeling Slim Whitman.
Texas is a huge state. A friend of mine from way back lives there and says a lot of old eighties Heavy Metal bands can still find an audience in Texas. I imagine there are a lot of different musical styles around those parts. I wouldn't like the heat.

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