Racism Still Divides Black and White ...
Shakalaka

Morrow, GA

#138 Mar 10, 2013
Candidate Bush ran as a "uniter, not divider" and coined the phrase "compassionate conservative" as a way of describing his approach to politics and policy decisions. Yet, from Bush’s days in the governor’s mansion in Texas, to the campaign trail for the presidency, to the White House itself, he has used race both to build his political career and to shore up and solidify his right-wing, Christian fundamentalist base.

In Texas, Bush oversaw the execution of over 150 death row inmates–a disproportionate number of whom were Black and Latino. Bush stopped on the campaign trail, returned to Texas and oversaw the execution of Gary Graham (also known as Shaka Sankofa), an African American man sentenced to death at age 17.3

Bush’s campaign stop in South Carolina was also illuminating on issues related to race. He refused to condemn South Carolina’s continued insistence on flying the Confederate flag–a symbol of slavery and white supremacy. Moreover, he accepted an invitation to speak at the controversial Bob Jones University–which maintains a policy against interracial dating. Bush decided to say nothing about the policy as he accepted an honorary award from the school.4

In 2000, Bush won less than 10 percent of the Black vote–a low even for Republicans. To make matters worse, as the 2000 election debacle unfolded in Florida, it became clear that the election shenanigans–which included wiping 57,000 names, mostly Blacks, from the list of eligible voters–were not unintentional errors, but instead involved orchestrated and systematic efforts at disenfranchising African American and immigrant voters.5

Rather than a break from the past, however, the Bush administration represents an acceleration of more than two decades of attacks on the gains of the civil rights movement of the 1960s. It is no coincidence that Bill Clinton also made a 1992 campaign stop in Arkansas to oversee the execution of a retarded Black man. These accumulated attacks have resulted in a lack of access to well paying jobs, good schools, affordable housing, affirmative action and government-sponsored entitlement programs that are aimed at blunting the effects of racism for African Americans.

The Bush administration also represents the changing class nature of racism and its impact on Blacks as a whole. On his staff are the two highest-ranked African Americans ever appointed to a presidential cabinet–National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice and Secretary of State Colin Powell. One would be hard-pressed to argue that these two key figures of Bush’s inner circle are just puppets or "Uncle Toms" within the Bush administration. In Bush’s campaign for war against Iraq, both Rice and Powell were central to sell the war at home and abroad.

“Sexy & Independent”

Since: Dec 12

Location hidden

#139 Mar 10, 2013
Shakalaka wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm not some fake as wanna be halle Berry's Sister bitch though. and your language is terrible. you need to have your mouth washed out with soap. I'm horrified by it. smdh Is that what you hear at home? Is that how your black daddy talks to your white momma? That's not good honey. Are you people in counseling? Do I need to call your "Dr. Phil"??? geezeeee Listen, I've been to church this morning and your cussing is interferring with the "word". ROFL
My family is doing quite well. Your jealously and envy towards me is very well noted. You don't even know what my parents look like idiot. Who ever raised you did a sorry job. You are a sick, mentally challenged, miserable, bitter, dumb idiot. You use so much profanity that I am amazed a racist hypocrite like you goes to church. Church will not help you monster so please see the shrink ASAP. Increase that dosage of PROZAC. You have no business working around or teaching Junior High School children (if you really have a job). You are not mentally stable enough to be around children. Go see Mr. Phil and quit posting to me skank. Your hypocrisy and true colors have been exposed. Find another way to boost this damn thread psycho.
Shakalaka

Morrow, GA

#140 Mar 10, 2013
These two are not the only African Americans on top of the heap. Currently, the CEOs of American Express, Merrill Lynch and the AOL division of Time Warner are African American. These are just a few examples of a greater phenomenon of some Blacks who now benefit from the system.6

That both of these realities co-exist–conditions of deprivation for the vast majority and increasing wealth and power for a tiny minority–raises questions about fighting racism today. What are the conditions under which this fight will unfold? Who are the allies in this fight? What is the possibility of building a movement that can actually take on the Bush agenda and the broader challenges of fighting for racial justice in the U.S. today? This article will attempt to address these questions.

The state of Black America

The statistics, which are the clearest barometers for determining and measuring the quality of life in American society, show that African Americans continue to lag behind whites in every possible category. Not only does this point to the depth of racial inequality in this society, but it clearly undermines the idea that racism is simply a matter of prejudice, existing only on an ideological level.

As the booming economy of the 1990s drew to a close, Black poverty rates dropped to a record low of 23 percent. Black unemployment fell to a record low of 7.2 percent in September of 1999. But this did little to close the gap of economic inequality that continues to separate Blacks from whites.7

In 1999, median income for African Americans was $31,778, compared to $51,244, for the median income of white families. According to one report, in 1995, average white households had $18,000 in financial wealth, while Black households possessed a total of only $200. In 2001, 30 percent of both Black and Latino children lived in poverty.8

Even at its historic low of 7.2 percent, Black unemployment still was twice the unemployment level for whites.9 These numbers did not take into account the nearly one million Black men locked up in prison and jail, which, by some estimates would increase the overall unemployment level by two percentage points.10 Moreover, since 2001, when the economy officially went into recession, official Black unemployment has drifted between 10 and 11 percent. An added result of the recession is that the drop in Black poverty rates, a result of the economic expansion of the 1990s, has been reversed and Black poverty is again on the rise. According to the Census Bureau, 24 percent of Blacks now live in poverty–up from 22 percent in 2001.11 Additionally, there was a 3 percent decrease in the Black median income.12

"African Americans tend to be the last to be hired when the economy is booming. That means that they also tend to be the first to lose their jobs when a downturn hits," according to Stephanie Armour writing in USA Today in December 2002. She goes on to say, "job losses have been deep in manufacturing and construction, they have also hit retailers, which lost 39,000 jobs in November. Jobs in those industries tend to be disproportionately held by African Americans…department store hiring was down by 17,000, the worst November for store hiring since 1982."13 In July 2003, the New York Times reported:
Shakalaka

Morrow, GA

#141 Mar 10, 2013
Unemployment among Blacks is rising at a faster pace than in any similar period since the mid-1970s…nearly 2.6 million jobs have disappeared overall during the last 28 months… nearly 90 percent of those jobs were in manufacturing…with Blacks hit disproportionately harder than whites.14
The disproportionate impact of layoffs on African Americans in the recession of the early 1990s further illustrates how racism compounds an already bad situation when the economy begins to contract. The Wall Street Journal reported during the recession of 1990—1991, a significant number of major corporations cut Blacks’ jobs at a much higher rate than for white workers. J.P. Morgan, where Blacks represented 16 percent of the workforce in 1990, responded to the recession by relocating its clerical and data processing operations from New York City to Delaware. Black employees suffered almost 30 percent of total job losses. At Coca-Cola in 1990, Blacks made up almost 18 percent of the labor force. When the company decided to cut its workforce in response to the economic downturn, over 42 percent of Black workers absorbed job cuts. Sears, which had a Black workforce of 15.9 percent, closed its distribution centers concentrated in central cities and reduced its clerical staff. More than 54 percent of all Sears employees who lost their jobs in the recession of 1990—1991 were African American, which was three and a half times the rate of job loss for whites in the company.15
Shakalaka

Morrow, GA

#142 Mar 10, 2013
Racism exits. All the denials in the world do not change this fact. We WILL discuss it in this African American forum. For those of you who have a problem with my postings but nothing to add to the conversation, please just keep it moving because you ARE the problem.

I went to a book signing in Raleigh-Durham a couple of years back to hear Randall Kenan who is the author of The Cross of Redemption (a Collection of previously unpublished writings by the late James Baldwin)He Randall Kenan teaches creative writing at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. There were many whites who had attended the book signing and who had questions that I must say at the time, I thought were ridiculous. One such questions was, "How do I began to talk with Black people?" This question was asked in an attempt to show that she was open to discussing the problem, and aware that a problem existed. I just found it unbelievable that one would ask...How to began a conversation with another human being. But after visiting this forum, I see indeed that she made a bold effort because the whites (most of them here) and some Bi-racials are in complete denial that racism even exist. And ...that if it does, it's a "negro" problem. They don't want to discuss "real" issues, but boy can they talk about the dumb stuff that keeps racism alive and well.

Ask them why they even bother to come into this African American forum and they can't even be honest about that!
Shakalaka

Morrow, GA

#143 Mar 10, 2013
I'm out! a challenge from the girls is at hand. They ought to know that I am the "Tiger Woods" of Bowling!!!! LOL

“Sexy & Independent”

Since: Dec 12

Location hidden

#144 Mar 10, 2013
Shakalaka wrote:
S'why I refuse to socialize with some people. No morals or principles. We've got to change Merica! LOL
We need to let more Mexicans in and run some of these so call Merican citizens up outta here. ummm hmmm
We need more people with "class" here. Comprende?
Estoy cansado de todo este comportamiento maldiciones y lewed y insideous mostrada por los estadounidenses en este foro. Sobre todo a partir de éste que Calles se hermana Halle Berry.
I am fluent in other languages as well. You have no business working around or teaching Junior High School Children. You are a danger to children. You are racist and mentally unstable. CPS needs to take your children away you dumb psychotic skank. Find another way to boost this damn thread you racist hypocrite. Quit posting to me.
Anonymous

Triangle, VA

#145 Mar 10, 2013
Shakalaka wrote:
I'm out! a challenge from the girls is at hand. They ought to know that I am the "Tiger Woods" of Bowling!!!! LOL
Thanks for the post and have a good game.
Shakalaka

Morrow, GA

#146 Mar 10, 2013
Halle Berry Sister wrote:
<quoted text>
I am fluent in other languages as well. You have no business working around or teaching Junior High School Children. You are a danger to children. You are racist and mentally unstable. CPS needs to take your children away you dumb psychotic skank. Find another way to boost this damn thread you racist hypocrite. Quit posting to me.
Do you get enough, get enough, get enough, get enough love.
I wanna know.
Baby, do you, do you get enough, get enough, get enough, get enough love.
Oooh.

If the answer's no, you're not by yourself.
There's others out there like you ...going through it too.
Some are luckier than others when it comes to romance.
Nothing is guaranteed.
We're all taking a chance.

Baby, do you, do you get enough, get enough, get enough, get enough love.
I wanna know, I gotta know, I wanna know.
Baby, do you, do you get enough, get enough, get enough, get enough love.

If you know something's wrong with you,
You better come see me,
'Cause I'm ready, willing, and able to give you what you need,
When you need, and oooh, how you need it.
Baby, anytime you need my love,
You know I'm gonna give it to you.

Baby, do you, do you get enough, get enough, get enough, get enough love.
I wanna know.(I wanna know, I wanna know.)
Baby, tell me.
Baby, do you, do you, do you.

LOL LOL LOL
Shakalaka

Morrow, GA

#147 Mar 10, 2013
Wow! What a wonderful day this has been. I bowled 238 a bit off my game but I still won! whooo hooo!

:) Must admit by bones are sore though.
Shakalaka

Morrow, GA

#148 Mar 10, 2013
Facing Racism and Sexism: Black Women in America
From the mid-1960s to the early 1970s, black women were in a difficult position. Between the civil rights and feminist movements, where did they fit in? They had been the backbone of the civil rights movement, but their contributions were deemphasized as black men — often emasculated by white society — felt compelled to adopt patriarchal roles. When black women flocked to the feminist movement, white women discriminated against them and devoted little attention to class issues that seriously affected black women, who tended to also be poor.

Historically, black women have chosen race over gender concerns, a choice that was especially poignant during Reconstruction when African American female leaders, such as Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, supported the Fifteenth Amendment giving black men the right to vote over the objections of white women suffragists.

Black women have a long feminist tradition dating back to 19th-century activists such as Maria W. Stewart and Sojourner Truth as well as organizations like the National Association of Colored Women's Clubs (NACWC) and the National Council of Negro Women, founded in 1896 and 1935, respectively. Events of the 1960s and 1970s, not to mention black men's changing attitudes regarding the role of black women, focused awareness around new concerns such as race, gender, and class, and several organizations attempted to address these issues:

The ANC (Aid to Needy Children) Mothers Anonymous of Watts and the National Welfare Rights Organization (NWRO): Johnnie Tillmon was an early pioneer of addressing the concerns of poor black women. A welfare mother living in Los Angeles's Nickerson Projects, Tillmon helped found ANC (Aid to Needy Children) Mothers Anonymous of Watts in 1963. She was later tapped to lead the National Welfare Rights Organization (NWRO), founded in 1966. Through these organizations, Tillmon addressed such issues as equal pay for women, child care, and voter registration.
Black Women's Liberation Committee (BWLC): Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) member Francis Beal was one of the founders of the Black Women's Liberation Committee (BWLC) in 1968. In 1969, Beal helped clarify the struggles of black women in the influential essay "Double Jeopardy: To Be Black and Female" that also appeared in the landmark 1970 anthology The Black Woman, which ushered in a new wave of black female writers. Beal identified capitalism as a key factor in the chasm between black men and women. During the early 1970s, the BWLC evolved into the Third World Women's Alliance.
National Organization for Women (NOW): Reverend Dr. Anna Pauline (Pauli) Murray is a cofounder of the nation's most prominent feminist organization, the National Organization for Women (NOW), founded in 1966.
The National Black Feminist Organization: While many black women remain active in mainstream feminist organizations only, other black women have created organizations aimed at addressing black women's unique concerns more effectively. The National Black Feminist Organization launched in 1973 with the specific goal of including black women of all ages, classes, and sexual orientation. Although it and similar organizations didn't outlive the 1970s, the legacy of black feminism lives on.
In 1983, Alice Walker coined the term womanism, a feminist ideology that addresses the black woman's unique history of racial and gender oppression. Women such as Angela Davis; law professor Kimberlé Crenshaw; academics Patricia Hill Collins, Beverly Guy Sheftall, and Bell Hooks; and historians Darlene Clark Hine, Paula Giddings, and Deborah Gray White have greatly expanded the context in which black women and their history and activism are discussed by underscoring black women's issues related to race, gender, and class.
Shakalaka

Morrow, GA

#149 Mar 10, 2013
10:12 AM ET
Opinion: What you really need to know about black women
Editor's note: Sophia A. Nelson, Esq., is the author of "Black Woman Redefined: Dispelling Myths and Discovering Fulfillment in the Age of Michelle Obama" She is a blogger and contributor to media outlets such as Essence, Heart & Soul, USATODAY, Fox News and NPR.

By Sophia A. Nelson, Special to CNN

Finally! The American media is beginning to take a sober and candid look at the real lives of 21st century black women, beyond the stereotypical and often angry images portrayed of us on TV reality shows or in the media. Shows like “The Real Housewives of Atlanta”,“The Game” and “Basketball Wives” portray us as morally loose, angry and even physically violent. Rap video vixens show our young sisters’ bodies writhing and shaking their rumps wildly. And movies like “The Help," Oscar-nominated or not, and Tyler Perry’s “For Colored Girls” portray us either through a historical lens as the saintly and weary mammy who saves the day for everyone but herself or as broken, battered, confused, too independent or too driven.

The truth is we are none of those things. Not really. Sure we have bad days. Sure we make bad choices. Sure we get angry. Doesn’t everyone? We are human after all. So why, then, are we the only group of women on the planet to have been so deftly defined and labeled as "angry" all the time? I suggest it is because we have never really defined ourselves and that needs to change.

Black women living in the “Age of Michelle Obama” are normal, everyday women, who want what everyone wants: love, connection, great relationships, a great mate, a strong and personal relationship with their creator (GOD), success in our careers, marriage (if it comes), babies (if they come), good health, happiness and fulfillment.

A recent Washington Post-Kaiser Family Foundation survey on black women affirms many of my book’s findings relative to black women, but we also have some divergent points because the focus of my Accomplished Black Women Sample Survey was more specifically on college-educated, professional black women. This is a critical difference because black women who are educated have taken the brunt of criticism around not living balanced and fulfilled lives (i.e. not being able to find and keep a man, marry and have children.) Now thanks to Michelle Obama, we can be seen as a norm, and no longer the "exception.”

Here's what my book’s survey’s national sample n=1000 (+/3) and college-educated black female sample (n=540) shared relative to how Michelle Obama is changing things:

• 87% of the black female survey respondents believe that First Lady Michelle Obama has helped dispel negative stereotypes of accomplished black women in America and 75% of black male (n=211) respondents agreed with that sentiment.

• The top descriptor words used in the 1,000 sample of all Americans (which included men, women, whites, blacks, Latinos) to describe Mrs. Obama chose the following words: wife & mother (82%), intelligent (76%), strong-willed (71%), and accomplished (70%).

• The top descriptor words the ABW Sample Survey respondent used to describe Mrs. Obama: intelligent (40%), accomplished (35%), wife and mother (28%), inspiring (26%), and role model (23%).

• Overall white men had the least favorable opinions of Mrs. Obama (21%) stating that they felt she had been "made over," and women in general (across racial lines) had more favorable responses toward her to a variety of questions posed about the first lady's impact.
Bubba

Hilliard, OH

#150 Mar 10, 2013
Shakalaka wrote:
Unemployment among Blacks is rising at a faster pace than in any similar period since the mid-1970s…nearly 2.6 million jobs have disappeared overall during the last 28 months… nearly 90 percent of those jobs were in manufacturing…with Blacks hit disproportionately harder than whites.
And yet you blacks went back to the polls last November and voted for Obama again. LOL!
Shakalaka

Morrow, GA

#151 Mar 10, 2013
Nevertheless, I am glad to see the national news media finally turn a serious eye to such an important subject matter. I was frankly starting to lose hope as a lone voice crying out in the proverbial wilderness. It has been a difficult journey trying to redefine the images of black women in America, particularly the image of the so-called "career driven" black woman who is supposedly destined to be childless and alone.

Kris Marsh: Where is the black middle class?

As we begin to re-define the Strong Black Woman, I wanted to weigh in on a few points that I think are critical takeaways that all Americans should consider as they befriend, work with, admire, date, support, and love black women.

• Our story as women is a unique journey forged through slavery, Jim Crow and the civil rights movement. It is unparalleled by our white sisters - or by other women of color to be candid. To truly "get us" America can no longer ignore our context. History often shapes stereotypes and labels.

• Black women are smart, compassionate, loving and giving. We hold it down everyday, while carrying the unique burden of both race and gender stereotypes on our backs daily. It ain't easy, folks, and sometimes, yes, we do get angry.

• Mrs. Obama is a game changer for black women of a new generation because she is the living, breathing embodiment of success, wellness, family, achievement, compassion, strength, and positivity all in perfect balance.

The bottom line: Black women are neither angry and strident, nor invisible and to be taken for granted. Paraphrasing what Miss Celie says in the movie, "The Color Purple": We may be black, and we may be perceived as "ugly," but we are here.

And Mrs. Obama's wonderful and balanced legacy ensures that we are here to stay.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Sophia A. Nelson.
Anonymous

Triangle, VA

#152 Mar 10, 2013
Welcome back Shakalaka!! Glad you had a good game. And great post. Very informative. And what's a good score in bowling anyway???
Shakalaka

Morrow, GA

#153 Mar 10, 2013
A Cure for Racism in America

an interesting perspective:

Until we understand that the gravity of our rebellion against God racism will continue to jump out! The problem we face as a nation is not between black and white, it is not between man and man, it’s between man and God.

J.I. Packer has commented in his epic book, Knowing God,“All that has gone wrong in human life between man and man is ultimately due to sin, and our present state of being in the wrong with ourselves and our fellows cannot be cured as long as we remain in the wrong with God.”

The predicament lies in the law.“Cursed be he who does not confirm the words of this law by doing them”(Duet 27:26). The curse or judgment of God, which the law pronounces on lawbreakers, rests on us, This is the predicament of mankind. We have all sinned and fallen short of the glory of God.

So, if there ever was an answer to man’s dilemma, it has to be in the cross.
Christ has redeemed us by becoming a curse for us and taking away our sin when he died in our place on the cross. Jesus became sin (2 Cor. 5:21a). When we look at the Cross, we never have to ask if sin is real. It is so real that Jesus had to “become sin” in order to defeat it. And in that moment, he experienced the horror of feeling forsaken.

But Jesus also conquered sin (2 Cor 5:21b). The curse is transformed into the blessing. Christ is Victor! When I think of the Cross in this way, it reminds me of Angel Casiano’s Martial Arts Program and the many other Christian Martial Arts programs. It is taking the power of the opponent and transferring it into the power of the other. That which would have destroyed us, has now lost its power over us—Satan has been cast out—and that power is now unleashed as the power of God. In this way, God and Jesus could both speak of “glorification.”

Death has been swallowed up (1 Cor. 15:54), taken into the mouth of him who declared,“It is finished!”
Anonymous

Triangle, VA

#154 Mar 10, 2013
Mmmm....let me think on that.

“Sexy & Independent”

Since: Dec 12

Location hidden

#155 Mar 10, 2013
Shakalaka wrote:
<quoted text>
Do you get enough, get enough, get enough, get enough love.
I wanna know.
Baby, do you, do you get enough, get enough, get enough, get enough love.
Oooh.
If the answer's no, you're not by yourself.
There's others out there like you ...going through it too.
Some are luckier than others when it comes to romance.
Nothing is guaranteed.
We're all taking a chance.
Baby, do you, do you get enough, get enough, get enough, get enough love.
I wanna know, I gotta know, I wanna know.
Baby, do you, do you get enough, get enough, get enough, get enough love.
If you know something's wrong with you,
You better come see me,
'Cause I'm ready, willing, and able to give you what you need,
When you need, and oooh, how you need it.
Baby, anytime you need my love,
You know I'm gonna give it to you.
Baby, do you, do you get enough, get enough, get enough, get enough love.
I wanna know.(I wanna know, I wanna know.)
Baby, tell me.
Baby, do you, do you, do you.
LOL LOL LOL
LOL. I get plenty of love and attention. I am not insecure and mad at the world like you are. Find a man and get laid very soon because you need it. I am sorry that you had your children out of WEDLOCK. Your babies' daddy needs his *** whipped from creating children with a psycho and letting a generation of mentally unstable people grow. I am sorry he left you. I feel sorry for your children. I hope you are not teaching your children to be racist like you. You have no business working around or teaching Junior High School Children. You are not mentally stable enough to be around children of all races. You are a hypocrite and a racist. Quit posting to me and find another way to boost this thread.

Raptors Revenge

“Democraps are stupid.”

Level 5

Since: Feb 13

Location hidden

#156 Mar 11, 2013
Shakalaka wrote:
<quoted text>
“Blame whitey” is a phrase or idea that often comes up when arguing about race in America. It is almost always a white person who says it, either straight out or in so many words. The idea is that blacks sit back and do nothing but blame white people for all their troubles, expecting a hand-out.
It is just two words, but do not let that fool you.
Here is some of what those two words do:
By using the word “blame” it turns the tables in an argument, it points the finger back at blacks, taking the attention off of what whites do and puts it on what blacks do – or not do. It forces blacks to play defense.
The word “blame” also says that whatever the misdeeds of whites may be, they are not the root cause of the troubles that blacks have. Just like when someone blames others for his own mess to avoid owning up to the fault.
Your whole existence is a lie!
LOL!!!! Of course it's whites that always say it. You sure as hell aren't going to hear anyone that is black to say it.
SMDH

Whites say it because they are sick and tired of blacks using it as an excuse, and being blamed for something they had no part of. For instance most blacks still blame today's whites for slavery when nobody owned a slave, or has been a slave. Why is it that every race has been under slavery during history, but blacks are only ones that continue to dwell on it? You can't claim that blacks were treated worse than anyone else because you were not.
Shakalaka

Morrow, GA

#158 Mar 11, 2013
Much of the early language associated with cowboy culture had a strong African flavor. The word buckra (buckaroo) is derived from Mbakara, the Efik/lbibio work for “poor white man.” It was used to describe a class of whites who worked as broncobusters, bucking and breaking horses. Planters used buckras as broncobusters because slaves were too valuable to risk injury. Another African word that found its way into popular cowboy songs is “get along little dogies.” The word “doggies” originated from Kimbundu, along with kidogo, a little something, and dodo, small. After the Civil War when great cattle roundups began, Black cowboys introduced such Africanisms to cowboy language and songs.

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