12 Years a Slave/ What did you really...

12 Years a Slave/ What did you really get from it?

Posted in the African-American Forum

“ News”

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Since: Aug 11

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#1 Nov 13, 2013
I saw this movie a couple of weeks ago. Although it showed a deeper description of the harsh realities slaves had to endure, I still didn't get much out of it. The things they showed were the things everybody already had some ideal was going on. Just seeing what happened in Roots with the rapes, lynchings, and burning of slaves alive was already enough for me to see. And they still like to show these episodes on BET every Christmas for some reason, and we buy right into it.

I just didn't see where it was necessary to see Roots in detail, which was similar to what this movie did. I guess there will be another movie one day showing even more than what this one did, meanwhile life for African-Americans in this country seems to be getting worst. Some say these recent slave movies are being used to keep black people unconscious of what's going on today, by making them glad they're not living the lives of the slaves.

In the other two slave movies, I got something a little more positive from them, and I was able to analogize something in each of those two movies to something positive in my life. In Django Unchained, I was able to see myself telling all my bosses off in spades along with several other people on my old job in powerful positions, as I walked away leaving them in their sinking plantation like environment. In The Butler, when I saw how the revolutionary son showed his father how important it was to stand up for what was right, and how it paid off in the long run, I saw myself when I was taking a stand for what was right on my old job, showing this particular older co-worker who was old enough to be my father, and who believed in going along to get along, how wrong he was for writing me off when they had me under attack.

However, 12 Years a Slave only made me sorry that I ever moved from the North to the South (this part anyway), when I compare it to what I got out of the previous two slave movies. The part that really made me wonder, was the scene where the slave woman was showing agony while she talked about all the suffering she did just to survive, including having a child by her white master, just to wound up where she was, living in much worst conditions. Although the movies was informative, it was more like watching Roots all in Kunta Kintes' generation. What did you all think of the movie?
Under Employed

Toronto, Canada

#2 Nov 13, 2013
Racism has become the "Black narrative". Its getting kind of boring. The media when it comes to African-Americans has gone backwards. Sad really. The movie was good but this story of "Black struggles" is not the whole story of everyday life for the average racialized person. This narrow depiction of Blacks is adding to the swelling of symbolic racism you see today. Society is going backwards and this new obsession by whites about the past is getting weird.

“Repent and worship God”

Since: Jul 13

Location hidden

#3 Nov 13, 2013
KPITRL wrote:
I saw this movie a couple of weeks ago. Although it showed a deeper description of the harsh realities slaves had to endure, I still didn't get much out of it. The things they showed were the things everybody already had some ideal was going on. Just seeing what happened in Roots with the rapes, lynchings, and burning of slaves alive was already enough for me to see. And they still like to show these episodes on BET every Christmas for some reason, and we buy right into it.

I just didn't see where it was necessary to see Roots in detail, which was similar to what this movie did. I guess there will be another movie one day showing even more than what this one did, meanwhile life for African-Americans in this country seems to be getting worst. Some say these recent slave movies are being used to keep black people unconscious of what's going on today, by making them glad they're not living the lives of the slaves.

In the other two slave movies, I got something a little more positive from them, and I was able to analogize something in each of those two movies to something positive in my life. In Django Unchained, I was able to see myself telling all my bosses off in spades along with several other people on my old job in powerful positions, as I walked away leaving them in their sinking plantation like environment. In The Butler, when I saw how the revolutionary son showed his father how important it was to stand up for what was right, and how it paid off in the long run, I saw myself when I was taking a stand for what was right on my old job, showing this particular older co-worker who was old enough to be my father, and who believed in going along to get along, how wrong he was for writing me off when they had me under attack.

However, 12 Years a Slave only made me sorry that I ever moved from the North to the South (this part anyway), when I compare it to what I got out of the previous two slave movies. The part that really made me wonder, was the scene where the slave woman was showing agony while she talked about all the suffering she did just to survive, including having a child by her white master, just to wound up where she was, living in much worst conditions. Although the movies was informative, it was more like watching Roots all in Kunta Kintes' generation. What did you all think of the movie?
I believe it was a brilliant movie that depicted life as it was thru the main character's eyes which was a true story.
Blacks Are Worthless

Miami, FL

#4 Nov 13, 2013
I believe these slave movies serve as a good reminder that black boys & gals need to behave in White America or taste the crack of the whip again.

usslave.blogspot.com/2011/10/whipping-scars-o...

“ News”

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#5 Nov 15, 2013
Phoenix Ascended wrote:
<quoted text>
I believe it was a brilliant movie that depicted life as it was thru the main character's eyes which was a true story.
Since this thread didn't get too many replies, which didn't surprise me, could you tell any other reasons why you thought this movies was brilliant, other than because it was a true story?

Level 3

Since: Apr 12

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#6 Nov 15, 2013
I saw it this past weekend..I was a little disappointed . I thought it should have shown more clips of how the free blacks lived in the North. We have seen enough footage of brutal slave life. I wanted to see the type of diversity free blacks had to overcome. I left the movie realizing bw had it worst during those times between the rape and jealous actions of the slave master's wife. They turned a blind eye to their own husbands infidelity yet took out their anger on the rape victims.

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Since: Apr 12

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#7 Nov 15, 2013
My husband was mad that there was more whites in the theater than blacks. He whispered to me "I better not hear one of these crackers laughing". Lmao
Gone

Pittsburgh, PA

#8 Nov 15, 2013
Same old slave movie but well written and interesting I love how they kept saying in the media "Brad Pitts in it" LOL yep for a whole 3 mins at the end they trolled with that

“War is the father of all”

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#10 Nov 15, 2013
12 Years a Slave is hailed by critics as a long-awaited breakthrough that finally dares to mention the subject of slavery after decades of the entertainment industry being controlled by the South. Yet as cinema encyclopedist Leonard Maltin notes:

12 Years A Slave is a remake. What’s more, the original television film was directed by the celebrated Gordon Parks. Why no one seems to remember this is a mystery to me, yet all too typical of what I’ll call media amnesia. It first aired on PBS in 1984 as Solomon Northup’s Odyssey, reached a wider audience the following year when it was repeated as an installment of American Playhouse, and made its video debut under the title Half Slave, Half Free.

You can watch the 1984 version online for $2.99.

The remake has more whippings, though.

“War is the father of all”

Level 4

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#11 Nov 15, 2013
A glance at Northup’s ghostwritten 1853 memoir makes clear that in 1841, rather than being a pillar of this Yankee community, he was an unemployed fiddler dragged down by his own “shiftlessness”
..........
Paradoxically, Northup’s life in slavery is better documented than his murky life in freedom. His poor family never reported or even guessed that he’d been kidnapped. They apparently assumed that vanishing was just the kind of thing he’d do.

On the other hand, property records show that Northup spent many years toiling on the ramshackle plantation of the notoriously cruel Edwin Epps (played by Michael Fassbender—as always, a compelling movie star). Epps was a manic master who forced his slaves to cavort until dawn whenever he was in a “dancing mood.” Today, he’d be diagnosed as bipolar.

Northup’s eventual liberation was well-reported in the press and the courts 160 years ago. When word of his kidnapping finally arrived home in 1853, top officials in both New York and Louisiana were dismayed by the trick played upon this freeborn citizen and worked together to quickly have him released.

“War is the father of all”

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#12 Nov 15, 2013
(The assistance of pro-slavery politicians, such as Pierre Soulé, a US Senator from Louisiana, is a puzzle to the modern mind. But their reasoning was that slavery depended upon a punctilious regard for documented property rights. Thus, they were publicly outraged that a slave sale had been contracted without proper title.)

Northup then had prosecuted the slave dealer who had bought him, but the trial never resulted in a verdict.

Interestingly, the slaver defendant countercharged that Northup had conspired with his white cronies to defraud him of his purchase price by attempting to pull the old Skin Game con on him.
..........
Northup’s hometown newspaper, the Saratoga Press, surmised that Northup had been an accomplice in a scam gone awry:

…it is more than suspected that Sol Northup was an accomplice in the sale, calculating to slip away and share the spoils, but that the purchaser was too sharp for him, and instead of getting the cash, he got something else.

Indeed, at least one of the con men who sold Northup had previously engaged in the skin game with another black as bait.

But Northup denied at length in his memoir that he would lend himself to such a dangerous swindle.

Still, this theory that Northup was a man of raffish character rather than the tediously upright one depicted in 12 Years a Slave might explain another puzzling aspect of his tale: how little help he got from his fellow slaves.

“War is the father of all”

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#13 Nov 15, 2013
For instance, the movie explains that it took nine years for this talented man to get his hands on a single piece of paper to write his letter home. That implies that in all those years he had no help from the house slaves in pilfering a sheet of paper. In general, the movie depicts the other slaves as displaying remarkably little human warmth toward Northup. They mostly act like zombies whenever he is around. Perhaps they perceived him as untrustworthy?

When Northup finally arrived home, an abolitionist politician hired David Wilson, a white lawyer and part-time author, to be his ghostwriter. Wilson wrote Northup’s story in his own style, and they hit it big in the slave-narrative craze that followed the 1852 publication of Uncle Tom’s Cabin. An illustrated edition sold 30,000 copies—not as many as Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel, but more than enough to launch Northup on the abolitionist lecture circuit.

Sadly, he disappeared from history four years later. Some say he was re-kidnapped by the Slave Power to shut him up. But those who knew Northup best seem to have assumed that he had become a “worthless vagabond,” as his longsuffering wife’s obituary indelicately phrased it.

Almost all of this is left out of the movie as being far too interesting for Oscar Bait.

“AFRO beauty”

Since: Oct 13

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#14 Nov 15, 2013
I read the book and it was incredible! I plan to see the movie in a minute.

“Repent and worship God”

Since: Jul 13

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#15 Nov 15, 2013
KPITRL wrote:
<quoted text>Since this thread didn't get too many replies, which didn't surprise me, could you tell any other reasons why you thought this movies was brilliant, other than because it was a true story?
Well for one I would say the level of great acting that was involved in the movie moved me considering the nature of the roles that they had to play.

Truly these actors are under appreciated in mainstream Hollywood.

Since: Feb 13

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#17 Nov 15, 2013
Ms DP wrote:
I read the book and it was incredible! I plan to see the movie in a minute.
Yes the book was incredible. I'm gonna see the movie tomorrow night

“AFRO beauty”

Since: Oct 13

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#19 Nov 15, 2013
tinysmyth3 wrote:
I thought it was pretty good.
My husband and I laughed so hard everyone was getting annoyed but no one said anything though.
I liked the funny parts when they acted all sad....lol
I would recommend it to anyone with nothing better to do. It's a fine comedy to pass the time.
the civil war were millions of white southerners were slaughtered and lost everything ought to really tickle your fancy!

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