African-americans Are Majorively Of Igbo Descent

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kliplemet

Buggenhout, Belgium

#1 Jan 19, 2008
This is a little piece written by an African-American I came across on the net, and it states pretty much the exact same points I've stated and fellow AA friends of mine have stated in regards to the Igbo/AA strong and obvious connection, in which has been historically proven as well.

More and more I'm coming across site in where African-Americans who have taken the time to think and study openly into the ancestral descent of we African-Americans, have come to the blatantly obvious and historically documentively proven conclusion of that we African-Americans are a vastly majority Igbo descended people by about at least a 60% margin.

With each passing year of indepth study into the descendency of the African-American people, evidence is consistently compiling revealing to the world that, the once long believed and pushed upon idea of that we were made up of a massive mix of ethnic groups with no one being of majority in any one region or plantation is a false tale, pushed widely to induce greater sense of lost cause, confusion of ones self and disconnection from their African roots.

In the deep south (Georgia, South Carolina) there were massive coastal plantations known as the Gullah Estates in which were maned by upwards of a 80-85% Igbo majority, and in the Chesapeake region of the nation, especially Virgina, the Igbo made up such a large portion of both the free and slave population of the region that it was nicknamed by the blacks in the area New Eboland (Igboland), as mentioned in an unrelated documentary published in the early 1800's. A book named "murder at Montpelier" tells of the true story behind the assassination of President James Adams grandfather by a group of his female Igbo slaves who poisoned him. Igbo's made up over 80% of his estate's population.
kliplemet

Buggenhout, Belgium

#2 Jan 19, 2008
our son has no king: who-do Igbo
peace
I'm going to veer off direct hoodoo talk for a second to build a bit on what's inside the "beautiful, bubblin' pot" (thanks script priest) known as African-American culture.
I haven't invited too many Yoruba/Lukumi/Candomble heads into this space yet basically because I felt I needed to get this post out of the way first. It's a bit of a polemic, but it's been developed after many years of observation and informal research.
Many different peoples from many different parts of the Motherland came together in the United States to form the people we now call African-Americans. In the ongoing process of establishing and examinig our roots for purposes of self-determination and re-intergration the cultural and religious practices of certain extended family groups (aka tribes) have been forefronted and established themselves as the "norm" of "African" cultural practice in the States
In the area of religion the ATR's (African Traditional Religions) of the Yoruba, Fon, Kongo and Akan peoples have established themselves as the standard, with the Yoruba based religions being the "gold standard".
One thing all these peoples have in common is a hierarcheal political system based around a king (though it is my understanding that the Kongo system was much looser than the others). This co-incidentally (or not) coincided with the Western view of what an "evolved" political system should look like.
That these ATRs largely failed to esablish themselves in this country (with exception of Louisiana, where imports from Haiti brought Voodoo) has made it seem that African-Americans have somehow "lost" a part of their culture.
In the case of the "gold standard " Yoruba culture it's just not the case that the culture was "lost". The major forced exodus of the Yoruba populations out of Africa into the "New World" happened AFTER legal slave importation into the US. was banned so a widespread Yoruba diaspora was unable to estabish itself in the US.(note- I have been told a Yoruba community existed in Mobile, Ala.)
I contend that Bantu/Kongos (who were numerically the largest African group exported to America) did what they did elsewhere, which was align their practices with those of the culturally dominant groups (though I accept that it could be argued that alot of Bantu knowlegde DID dissappear- but the fact that Dr. Buzzard's bones have never been found tells me ALL the secrets weren't lost- they just stayed secret).
It should be mentioned that the ancestors themselves re-established Akan practices in the US.
So who is this seemingly invisible dominant African cultural group?, I've always been struck by the fact that jazz developed and evolved in the US and nowhere else in the African diaspora. My inital intuition was that it had to do with with a particular set of people that were sent to and flourished in the US and not elsewhere.
After reading some anarchist theory I realized that jazz reflected a very similar thought process to what the anarchists aspired to. Which got me to thinking there must have cultural precedent, probably going back to Africa, for the egalitarian structure of dixieland, bebop, free jazz, etc.
Which led to research on which set of people actually came to the US. I used to tell my friends that it seemed everyone who didnt want to be ruled in Africa got sent to the States.
I started to feel I was on the right track when I found info on the warlords in Senegambia (who were Muslim) who would capture and sell the people who wouldn't accept their rulership and those who wouldnt convert to Islam to the British.
The people who the Wolof warlords conquered lived in what the anthropologists called stateless societies.
kliplemet

Buggenhout, Belgium

#3 Jan 19, 2008
They didnt have kings or large-scale overarching external political structures.
Everything was decieded locally and everyone who was considered free had a say.
While researching my Sea Island roots I found the same political structure existed among the Mende, Temne, etc. Now we're getting somewhere.
Then I found the book "The Igbo Of Southeast Nigeria". It sat on my shelf for awhile before i deceided to read it. All I can say is every A-A interested in the culture of the US needs to read that book.
If you don't see the thought processes of yourself or someone you know well (for better or worse) reflected in that book I'll be shocked.
I'd go so far as to say in my opinion the Igbo culture holds the place in the US that the Yoruba culture holds in Brazil, Trinidad, and Cuba.
The Bight of Biafra was the largest exporter of slaves in the late 1700's early 1800's.
Legal inportation of slaves ended in the US in 1807.
(As an aside I recently read a book about Denmark Vesey and his aborted rebellion in Charleston.He had 5000 soldiers (I believe) broken up into thre sections Gullah (led by Gullah Jack) mainland and Igbo.)
Anyway, there is a saying "the Igbo have no kings."
What does this have to do with hoodoo (or roots as my Granma would say)?
With no king your personal relationship to God and his fractal manifestation in you,
your Chi as the Igbo say,
becomes the most important one for the community as well as yourself.
The power of God, in his mercy and his judgement falls directly on your's and the community's heads. The lack of a king means each individual is his own king, with the powers and responsibilities inherent in that role.
What the ancestors and world gives you is yours to use and innovate with as you see fit if you can get ancestral and community sanction.
God himself will judge you (as Tupac knew). It also means imo that it's each individual's responsiblity to create and maintain the community with the power God gave them and each individual's responsibilty to police, adjust and when necessary heal themselves and the community with the assistance of the ancestors, their Chi, and God.
Each person is their own fractal diety to the extent that they can manifest that power within themselves.
From this perspective there is no one to bow to but the Highest.
one
kliplemet

Buggenhout, Belgium

#4 Jan 19, 2008
our son has no king: who-do Igbo

peace

I'm going to veer off direct hoodoo talk for a second to build a bit on what's inside the "beautiful, bubblin' pot" (thanks script priest) known as African-American culture.
I haven't invited too many Yoruba/Lukumi/Candomble heads into this space yet basically because I felt I needed to get this post out of the way first. It's a bit of a polemic, but it's been developed after many years of observation and informal research.

Many different peoples from many different parts of the Motherland came together in the United States to form the people we now call African-Americans. In the ongoing process of establishing and examinig our roots for purposes of self-determination and re-intergration the cultural and religious practices of certain extended family groups (aka tribes) have been forefronted and established themselves as the "norm" of "African" cultural practice in the States
In the area of religion the ATR's (African Traditional Religions) of the Yoruba, Fon, Kongo and Akan peoples have established themselves as the standard, with the Yoruba based religions being the "gold standard".
One thing all these peoples have in common is a hierarcheal political system based around a king (though it is my understanding that the Kongo system was much looser than the others). This co-incidentally (or not) coincided with the Western view of what an "evolved" political system should look like.
That these ATRs largely failed to esablish themselves in this country (with exception of Louisiana, where imports from Haiti brought Voodoo) has made it seem that African-Americans have somehow "lost" a part of their culture.
In the case of the "gold standard " Yoruba culture it's just not the case that the culture was "lost". The major forced exodus of the Yoruba populations out of Africa into the "New World" happened AFTER legal slave importation into the US. was banned so a widespread Yoruba diaspora was unable to estabish itself in the US.(note- I have been told a Yoruba community existed in Mobile, Ala.)
I contend that Bantu/Kongos (who were numerically the largest African group exported to America) did what they did elsewhere, which was align their practices with those of the culturally dominant groups (though I accept that it could be argued that alot of Bantu knowlegde DID dissappear- but the fact that Dr. Buzzard's bones have never been found tells me ALL the secrets weren't lost- they just stayed secret).
It should be mentioned that the ancestors themselves re-established Akan practices in the US.

So who is this seemingly invisible dominant African cultural group?, I've always been struck by the fact that jazz developed and evolved in the US and nowhere else in the African diaspora. My inital intuition was that it had to do with with a particular set of people that were sent to and flourished in the US and not elsewhere.
After reading some anarchist theory I realized that jazz reflected a very similar thought process to what the anarchists aspired to. Which got me to thinking there must have cultural precedent, probably going back to Africa, for the egalitarian structure of dixieland, bebop, free jazz, etc.
Which led to research on which set of people actually came to the US. I used to tell my friends that it seemed everyone who didnt want to be ruled in Africa got sent to the States.

“Concrete Rose”

Since: Dec 07

St Louis, MO

#5 Jan 19, 2008
kliplemet wrote:
This is a little piece written by an African-American I came across on the net, and it states pretty much the exact same points I've stated and fellow AA friends of mine have stated in regards to the Igbo/AA strong and obvious connection, in which has been historically proven as well.
More and more I'm coming across site in where African-Americans who have taken the time to think and study openly into the ancestral descent of we African-Americans, have come to the blatantly obvious and historically documentively proven conclusion of that we African-Americans are a vastly majority Igbo descended people by about at least a 60% margin.
With each passing year of indepth study into the descendency of the African-American people, evidence is consistently compiling revealing to the world that, the once long believed and pushed upon idea of that we were made up of a massive mix of ethnic groups with no one being of majority in any one region or plantation is a false tale, pushed widely to induce greater sense of lost cause, confusion of ones self and disconnection from their African roots.
In the deep south (Georgia, South Carolina) there were massive coastal plantations known as the Gullah Estates in which were maned by upwards of a 80-85% Igbo majority, and in the Chesapeake region of the nation, especially Virgina, the Igbo made up such a large portion of both the free and slave population of the region that it was nicknamed by the blacks in the area New Eboland (Igboland), as mentioned in an unrelated documentary published in the early 1800's. A book named "murder at Montpelier" tells of the true story behind the assassination of President James Adams grandfather by a group of his female Igbo slaves who poisoned him. Igbo's made up over 80% of his estate's population.
Maybe, but it's a fact that we derived from other West African tribes as well. I have seen pictures of the Igbo and can see the resemblance of them and other AA's that I see. I also looked at some of the Hausa films on youtube and burst into laughter because alot of the women on there singing look like so many of the women that I have seen that are AA's. I am tall and thin, w/a lanky build and mostly legs, and I saw a lot of the women on Hausa movies that were like that. Are those tribes related in any way? I haven't taken the time out to find out more information on the slave trade, shame on me.
Mack the Great

Washington, DC

#6 Jan 19, 2008
Michelle Kia wrote:
<quoted text>
Maybe, but it's a fact that we derived from other West African tribes as well. I have seen pictures of the Igbo and can see the resemblance of them and other AA's that I see. I also looked at some of the Hausa films on youtube and burst into laughter because alot of the women on there singing look like so many of the women that I have seen that are AA's. I am tall and thin, w/a lanky build and mostly legs, and I saw a lot of the women on Hausa movies that were like that. Are those tribes related in any way? I haven't taken the time out to find out more information on the slave trade, shame on me.
And of Central African descent to a lesser extent as well.......
flashinglights

Kyle, TX

#7 Jan 19, 2008
uhhhhhhhh....no lol. the majority of black americans do not have any igbo ancestry. the majority of african americans are of west african descent though, but there are several other countries in the west coast of africa other than nigeria. i don't know why thats always the first place people name.

“Concrete Rose”

Since: Dec 07

St Louis, MO

#8 Jan 19, 2008
flashinglights wrote:
uhhhhhhhh....no lol. the majority of black americans do not have any igbo ancestry. the majority of african americans are of west african descent though, but there are several other countries in the west coast of africa other than nigeria. i don't know why thats always the first place people name.
I don't know about Igbo, but "researchers" and genetic testing suggests that atleast 2 or 3 in 5 of us has Nigerian ancestry.
Big Sistah Pat

Atlanta, GA

#10 Feb 5, 2008
The Ibos constituted about about 25% of the slave population in the US. There was only 480,000-500,000 Africans brought to the US. This is about 5% of the total Africans in the Atlantic Slave Trade.
Yes I would agree that Igbos have a big influence on AA society. However, we must not ignore the other very large groups, the Angolans and the Kongos. These groups had a significant contribution to AA socity. They constituted about 30%. So to say that the majority of AAs have Ibo ancestry is incorrect. To say a relatively large percentage of AAs have Ibo ancestry is more valid.
I would suggest y'all read Michael Gomez's Exchanging Our Country Marks and Dreams of Africa in Alabama by Slyvaine Diouf.
Note:
My sister has slanted eyes, and we would make fun of her that she must have some Asian in her. I was ignorant then. When I was in Nigeria and I was on a beach one sunday afternoon, I saw many slanted eyed African Hausa women. I died laughing and had to inform my family.
Big Sistah Pat

Atlanta, GA

#11 Feb 5, 2008
In regard to the Yoruba there numbers in the US are extremely small, less that 7000. There only influence on AA culture is maybe New Orleans, and that is also attributed the large amount of Haitians that immigrated there after the Haitian Revolution, and in the lower Mississippi. Therefore the Yorubas are in insignificant factor in the the creation of the AAs society. The other groups that I mentioned the Ibos, the Akans, BaKongo, and the Angolans aret the significant groups.

Since: Dec 07

Chesterfield, MO

#12 Feb 5, 2008
I am igbo my family came here in the late 70's from Nigeria so i am not really African American, but i do see a lot of African Americans who look exactly like my family,

Great thread and good read.

“"Ridding the world of dummies"”

Since: Jan 08

"The District"

#13 Feb 5, 2008
Whats the point of this inane thread?
Interesting

Atlanta, GA

#14 Feb 13, 2008
Lets keep in mind that AA are an amalgamation of numerious ethnic Africans, with a large European strain, and to a lesser degree native. The groups that are mentioned simply composed about 60% of the contribution to AA dna.

Note all folks out of the Bight of Biafra aren't Ibos. There are other sub groups, who may or may not be related to eacb other.

As I suggested, please read the books listed, and then we can talk.
Interesting

Atlanta, GA

#15 Feb 13, 2008
Flashlight,
It is simple. Present Nigeria,also Benin provided about 30% of the human chattle for almost three hundred years. The bulk of them where sent to the West Indies and South America. It was their major export. Numerous local Africans had other businesses directly and indirectly related to the support of the Transatlantic Slave trade.
In Haiti alone anywhere between 800,000 were deposited on an island. However, in the US no more than 500,000 were brought to North America.
The majority of slaves were the result of African ethnics wars. I think about 80%.
Again Nigeria, Benin, Ghana, Angola, and BaKongo made up 60% of the captives. Numerous other Africans were in the mix. We are just speaking of the ones who came in large and concentrated number. Again, we are a hybrid people. We are many people. We don't owe our existence to any one specific group. We are all of these people.

“Ase Ase Ase”

Since: Jan 08

Birmingham, AL

#16 Feb 13, 2008
kliplemet wrote:
I haven't invited too many Yoruba/Lukumi/Candomble heads into this space yet basically because I felt I needed to get this post out of the way first. It's a bit of a polemic, but it's been developed after many years of observation and informal research.
Are you sure you want to do that? It would be refreshing, but I think they would leave soon.
Henry

AOL

#17 Feb 13, 2008
The Africans that were sold into slavery(by their own kind I might add) were misfits, unwanted, violent prone, criminals, rapists, stupid. They were glad to get rid of them. Now, what we have here in America is an inbred colony of misfits.

“the king of his environment”

Level 3

Since: Oct 07

Washington, DC

#19 Feb 13, 2008
Henry wrote:
The Africans that were sold into slavery(by their own kind I might add) were misfits, unwanted, violent prone, criminals, rapists, stupid. They were glad to get rid of them. Now, what we have here in America is an inbred colony of misfits.
Shut up devil. The real scum in america is the european scum like you that they kicked out of europe because you were too stupid to achieve anything.

Since: Oct 07

chicago

#20 Feb 13, 2008
Henry wrote:
The Africans that were sold into slavery(by their own kind I might add) were misfits, unwanted, violent prone, criminals, rapists, stupid. They were glad to get rid of them. Now, what we have here in America is an inbred colony of misfits.
only in the minds of racists who don't deal with facts...

“Nesian-Power! ”

Since: Jun 07

BK

#21 Feb 14, 2008
Henry wrote:
The Africans that were sold into slavery(by their own kind I might add) were misfits, unwanted, violent prone, criminals, rapists, stupid. They were glad to get rid of them. Now, what we have here in America is an inbred colony of misfits.
FALSE!!! Dude, most of them were prisoners of war. Do the research please.

“Ase Ase Ase”

Since: Jan 08

Birmingham, AL

#22 Feb 14, 2008
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