blacks invented.......
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CCockSniffer

Sayreville, NJ

#1 Dec 31, 2013
Nothing.
l M WHlTE

Woodstock, GA

#2 Dec 31, 2013
True. Not a damn thing. Pitiful.
motts

Bridgetown, Barbados

#4 Dec 31, 2013
Black history inventors are listed alphabetically: use the A to Z index bar to navigate and select or just browse the many listings. Each listing has the name of the black inventor followed by the patent number(s) which is the unique number assigned to an invention when a patent is issued, the date the patent was issued, and a description of the invention as written by the inventor. If available, links are provided to in-depth articles, biographies, illustrations and photos on each individual inventor or patent.

http://inventors.about.com/od/blackinventors/...
motts

Bridgetown, Barbados

#6 Dec 31, 2013
Top 10 African American Inventors

http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/bhis...
motts

Bridgetown, Barbados

#7 Dec 31, 2013
Welcome to the Black Inventor Online Museum ™, a look at the great and often unrecognized leaders in the field of invention and innovation. For more than 300 years, black inventors have served as pioneers in the field of science and have made enormous impacts on society. As African Americans sought freedom and equality, many among them, scientists, educators and even slaves, developed the tools and processes that helped to shape the modern agricultural, industrial and technological landscape. While some are famous, many remain unknown, but their contributions have assured that their stories are not only about black history, but about world history.

http://www.blackinventor.com
Chuck

United States

#8 Dec 31, 2013
African American inventors, inventions and patent numbers
http://m.topix.com/forum/afam/T0UL5BTM72SQKC6...
motts

Bridgetown, Barbados

#9 Dec 31, 2013
The question is..What have you trolls achieved in life that you spend all your time trying to co-opt the accomplishments of successful white people?

Successful White people don't troll Black forums, so I guess I have answered my own question..

Happy Trolling.
Donny Brook

Spicewood, TX

#12 Dec 31, 2013
For my ignorant, racist, morons who happen to be white, but not brother whites. Shut up if you don't know what you're talking about. It is one thing for people to think you're stupid, but altogether different for you to prove it to them.
l M WHlTE

Woodstock, GA

#20 Dec 31, 2013
motts wrote:
Black history inventors are listed alphabetically: use the A to Z index bar to navigate and select or just browse the many listings. Each listing has the name of the black inventor followed by the patent number(s) which is the unique number assigned to an invention when a patent is issued, the date the patent was issued, and a description of the invention as written by the inventor. If available, links are provided to in-depth articles, biographies, illustrations and photos on each individual inventor or patent.
http://inventors.about.com/od/blackinventors/...
Sorry. buckwheat..........but that afro-revisionist bullshit was written to soothe your fragile negroe egos has been debunked ad nauseam. The truth is, and remains, the pure-blood sub-Saharan African negroe has never contributed anything of any value to mankind whatsoever. Period.
l M WHlTE

Woodstock, GA

#21 Dec 31, 2013
Sir Jethro wrote:
There are so many Black invention myths, I don't feel like copy & pasting them all. Check out Tom Shelly's section on N iggermania.com
Agreed. Tom's site is a wealth of information that exposes the nighur animal for what it is.
l M WHlTE

Woodstock, GA

#23 Dec 31, 2013
Sir Jethro wrote:
<quoted text>He's an obviously, brilliant man.
I miss him and the gang from our AFN days. Good times!
Drilling for the nerve

Batavia, NY

#25 Jan 1, 2014
A guy named Demetrius 'Spinner Man' Johnson invented Gainfully Employed Body Spray For Black Men. He guarantees it will throw K-9 tracking dogs off your trail or your bail money's on him.

Jamal Lewis, who hails from my hometown of Zimbabwe By The Lake, NY, invented the Tall 40 Porch Cooler. A 3-page color brochure claims the Tall 40 Porch Cooler is "just the ticket when yo @_z be sattin on da porch all da zippity doo-dah day wit yo homies!"
blacks good

São Paulo, Brazil

#28 Jan 1, 2014
Sir Jethro wrote:
Let's give them "Twerking" although I have yet figured out how anyone could have invented it!
It looks like something the sow Carmiana would do to try and induce labor after a 18 month pregnancy.

looking at the level of the idols of you

Level 8

Since: Jan 11

Location hidden

#31 Jan 1, 2014
lol....this thread was over by the third post.
motts

Bridgetown, Barbados

#32 Jan 1, 2014
[QUOTE who=" I should make No Comment because I am uneducated, brain dead, and need a Black man to correct my poor English "]<quoted text>
...the way you're "co-opt" the black inventors list?
<quoted text>
[/QUOTE]

What kind of English is the above? LOL!

I merely POSTED a list of inventors and inventions with patents which none of you Caucasus mountain mutant rejects of white society can dispute with any credible evidence.

Now get back to trolling on our BLACK forum while EDUCATED WHITES get back to REAL work.
motts

Bridgetown, Barbados

#33 Jan 1, 2014
UNFORTUNATELY FOR THE TROLLS...

PATENT NUMBERS CANNOT BE REFUTED.

LET ME SEE ONE BRAIN DEAD TROLL TAKE HIS CASE TO ANY COURT LOL!

r
motts

Bridgetown, Barbados

#34 Jan 1, 2014
[QUOTE who="l M WHlTE AND IN DENIAL AND JEALOUS OF SUCCESSFUL BLACKS BECAUSE I AM POOR UNEDUCATED TRAILER TR*SH"]<quoted text>
Sorry. buckwheat..........but that afro-revisionist bullshit was written to soothe your fragile negroe egos has been debunked ad nauseam. The truth is, and remains, the pure-blood sub-Saharan African negroe has never contributed anything of any value to mankind whatsoever. Period.[/QUOTE]

Unfortunately for you, patent numbers are not handed out by trailer trash trolls like you and your buddies.

YOU CANNOT REFUTE PATENT NUMBERS FOOL!…..well maybe on Topix LOL!
motts

Bridgetown, Barbados

#35 Jan 1, 2014
Sir Jethro wrote:
copied and pasted
Traffic Signal
Invented by Garrett A. Morgan in 1923? No!
The first known traffic signal appeared in London in 1868 near the Houses of Parliament. Designed by JP Knight, it featured two semaphore arms and two gas lamps. The earliest electric traffic lights include Lester Wire's two-color version set up in Salt Lake City circa 1912, James Hoge's system (US patent #1,251,666) installed in Cleveland by the American Traffic Signal Company in 1914, and William Potts' 4-way red-yellow-green lights introduced in Detroit beginning in 1920. New York City traffic towers began flashing three-color signals also in 1920.
Garrett Morgan's cross-shaped, crank-operated semaphore was not among the first half-hundred patented traffic signals, nor was it "automatic" as is sometimes claimed, nor did it play any part in the evolution of the modern traffic light. For details see Inventing History: Garrett Morgan and the Traffic Signal.
Gas Mask
Garrett Morgan in 1914? No!
The invention of the gas mask predates Morgan's breathing device by several decades. Early versions were constructed by the Scottish chemist John Stenhouse in 1854 and the physicist John Tyndall in the 1870s, among many other inventors prior to World War I. See The Invention of the Gas Mask.
Peanut Butter
George Washington Carver (who began his peanut research in 1903)? No!
Peanuts, which are native to the New World tropics, were mashed into paste by Aztecs hundreds of years ago. Evidence of modern peanut butter comes from US patent #306727 issued to Marcellus Gilmore Edson of Montreal, Quebec in 1884, for a process of milling roasted peanuts between heated surfaces until the peanuts reached "a fluid or semi-fluid state." As the product cooled, it set into what Edson described as "a consistency like that of butter, lard, or ointment." In 1890, George A. Bayle Jr., owner of a food business in St. Louis, manufactured peanut butter and sold it out of barrels. J.H. Kellogg, of cereal fame, secured US patent #580787 in 1897 for his "Process of Preparing Nutmeal," which produced a "pasty adhesive substance" that Kellogg called "nut-butter."
George Washington Carver
"Discovered" hundreds of new and important uses for the peanut? Fathered the peanut industry? Revolutionized southern US agriculture? No!
Research by Barry Mackintosh, who served as bureau historian for the National Park Service (which manages the G.W. Carver National Monument), demonstrated the following:
Most of Carver's peanut and sweet potato creations were either unoriginal, impractical, or of uncertain effectiveness. No product born in his laboratory was widely adopted.
The boom years for Southern peanut production came prior to, and not as a result of, Carver's promotion of the crop.
Carver's work to improve regional farming practices was not of pioneering scientific importance and had little demonstrable impact.
To see how Carver gained "a popular reputation far transcending the significance of his accomplishments," read Mackintosh's excellent article George Washington Carver: The Making of a Myth.
PATENT NUMBERS, PLEASE?
motts

Bridgetown, Barbados

#36 Jan 1, 2014
Sir Jethro wrote:
Automatic Lubricator, "Real McCoy"
Elijah McCoy revolutionized industry in 1872 by inventing the first device to automatically oil machinery? No! The phrase "Real McCoy" arose to distinguish Elijah's inventions from cheap imitations? No!
The oil cup, which automatically delivers a steady trickle of lubricant to machine parts while the machine is running, predates McCoy's career; a description of one appears in the May 6, 1848 issue of Scientific American. The automatic "displacement lubricator" for steam engines was developed in 1860 by John Ramsbottom of England, and notably improved in 1862 by James Roscoe of the same country. The "hydrostatic" lubricator originated no later than 1871.
Variants of the phrase Real McCoy appear in Scottish literature dating back to at least 1856 — well before Elijah McCoy could have been involved.
Detailed evidence: The not-so-real McCoy
Also see The Fake McCoy and Did Somebody Say McTrash?
Blood Bank
Dr. Charles Drew in 1940? No!
During World War I, Dr. Oswald H. Robertson of the US army preserved blood in a citrate-glucose solution and stored it in cooled containers for later transfusion. This was the first use of "banked" blood. By the mid-1930s the Russians had set up a national network of facilities for the collection, typing, and storage of blood. Bernard Fantus, influenced by the Russian program, established the first hospital blood bank in the United States at Chicago's Cook County Hospital in 1937. It was Fantus who coined the term "blood bank." See highlights of transfusion history from the American Association of Blood Banks.
Blood Plasma
Did Charles Drew "discover" (in about 1940) that plasma could be separated and stored apart from the rest of the blood, thereby revolutionizing transfusion medicine? No!
The possibility of using blood plasma for transfusion purposes was known at least since 1918, when English physician Gordon R. Ward suggested it in a medical journal. In the mid-1930s, John Elliott advanced the idea, emphasizing plasma's advantages in shelf life and donor-recipient compatibility, and in 1939 he and two colleagues reported having used stored plasma in 191 transfusions.(See historical notes on plasma use.) Charles Drew was not responsible for any breakthrough scientific or medical discovery; his main career achievement lay in supervising or co-supervising major programs for the collection and shipment of blood and plasma.
More: Charles Drew Mythology
Washington DC city plan
Benjamin Banneker? No!
Pierre-Charles L'Enfant created the layout of Washington DC. Banneker assisted Andrew Ellicott in the survey of the federal territory, but played no direct role in the actual planning of the city. The story of Banneker reconstructing the city design from memory after L'Enfant ran away with the plans (with the implication that the project would have failed if not for Banneker) has been debunked by historians.
PATENT NUMBERS, PLEASE?
motts

Bridgetown, Barbados

#37 Jan 1, 2014
Sir Jethro wrote:
(US #124404).
Air Conditioner
Frederick Jones in 1949? No!
Dr. Willis Carrier built the first machine to control both the temperature and humidity of indoor air. He received the first of many patents in 1906 (US patent #808897, for the "Apparatus for Treating Air"). In 1911 he published the formulae that became the scientific basis for air conditioning design, and four years later formed the Carrier Engineering Corporation to develop and manufacture AC systems.
Airship
J.F. Pickering in 1900? No!
French engineer Henri Giffard successfully flew a powered navigable airship in 1852. The La France airship built by Charles Renard and Arthur Krebs in 1884 featured an electric motor and improved steering capabilities. In 1900 Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin's first rigid-framed dirigible took to the air. Of the hundreds of inventors granted patents for early airship designs and modifications, few succeeded in building or flying their craft. There doesn't appear to be any record of a "Pickering Airship" ever getting off the ground.
US Aviation Patent Database, 1799-1909
Automatic Railroad Car Coupler
Andrew Beard invented the "Jenny [sic] coupler" in 1897? No!
The Janney coupler is named for US Civil War veteran Eli H. Janney, who in 1873 invented a device (US patent #138405) which automatically linked together two railroad cars upon their being brought into contact. Also known as the "knuckle coupler," Janney's invention superseded the dangerous link-and-pin coupler and became the basis for standard coupler design through the remainder of the millennium. Andrew Beard's modified knuckle coupler was just one of approximately eight thousand coupler variations patented by 1900. See a history of the automatic coupler and also The Janney Coupler.
Automatic Transmission/Gearshift
Richard Spikes in 1932? No!
The first automatic-transmission automobile to enter the market was designed by the Sturtevant brothers of Massachusetts in 1904. US Patent #766551 was the first of several patents on their gearshift mechanism. Automatic transmission technology continued to develop, spawning hundreds of patents and numerous experimental units; but because of cost, reliability issues and an initial lack of demand, several decades passed before vehicles with automatic transmission became common on the roads.
Bicycle Frame
Isaac R. Johnson in 1899? No!
Comte Mede de Sivrac and Karl von Sauerbronn built primitive versions of the bicycle in 1791 and 1816 respectively. The frame of John Starley's 1885 "safety bicycle" resembled that of a modern bicycle.
PATENT NUMBERS, PLEASE?

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