Pan-Africanism/Nkrumahism

Level 8

Since: Aug 09

Saint Louis, MO

#1 Jul 29, 2013
Folks want to know if we should close down this forum. I do not see the point of having a forum is all we are going to discuss is what's between our legs. So let's have a serious discussion about Pan-Africanism. If we cannot discuss Pan-Africanism there is really not much else worth discussing.

Level 8

Since: Aug 09

Saint Louis, MO

#2 Jul 29, 2013
Savant claims to be a thinker and a philosopher. So let's ask him to define Nkrumahism for us.

Level 8

Since: Aug 09

Saint Louis, MO

#4 Jul 29, 2013
The Herald (Harare) is always a good place to find Pan-Africanism. Another is Gamal Nklrumah in Cairo Egypt and his al-Ahram Weekly. I will have something from Brother Gamal later


Zimbabwe: Ethiopian Airlines Boosts Pan-Africanism
By Bradwell Mhonderwa, 2 July 2013

IN one of my recent instalments I wrote about the need for corporate Africa to embed pan-African value systems in their business operations as a way of promoting intra-Africa trade and bringing the African people together.

The article intimated the need to apply Pan-Africanism in business and in our everyday lives so that the notion does not remain a mere high sounding slogan.

The founding fathers of the AU were passionate about achieving a united Africa that would occupy its grandstand on the world stage as an economic powerhouse.

Sadly, today Africa is still trapped in a web of negativities that restrict intra-regional trade and the free movement of its own people on the continent, thus impeding the much sought after economic growth and development.

As noted by the AfDB vice president and chief economist Professor Mthuli Ncube at the AfDB annual meeting in Morocco recently, strict visa requirements in African states are inhibiting intra-Africa trade and economic growth.

While there are efforts being made by regional groups and individual African states to drive the pan-African agenda albeit at a snail's pace, I am intrigued the most by the exploits of the Ethiopian Airlines which clearly has become a phenomenal Pan-African global business success story.

Ethiopian Airlines has over the years built a brand anchored on Pan-Africanism, and today the airline's widespread presence in Africa and the whole world is a manifest testimony to this remarkable achievement.

Pan-African values are embedded in the airline's vision, mission, and business operations to provide clear guidelines and inspiration to its staff complement of 6 557 employees, its customers, and all other stakeholders.

The Pan-African story of Ethiopian Airlines has helped it grow very fast to become an airline of choice for both international and regional air travelers.

Pan-Africanism has helped Ethiopian Airlines build a huge presence in the global civil aviation industry with the "Pan-African spirit" being its unmistakable identity.

Ethiopian Airlines offers its passengers world-class air travel service benchmarked by international standards and best practices.

http://allafrica.com/stories/201307020694.htm...

Level 4

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#5 Jul 29, 2013
Abdurratln wrote:
Folks want to know if we should close down this forum. I do not see the point of having a forum is all we are going to discuss is what's between our legs. So let's have a serious discussion about Pan-Africanism. If we cannot discuss Pan-Africanism there is really not much else worth discussing.
Pan-Africanism seems to be all talk. There is less solidarity among Africans than any other group. Look at all the tragedies and famine that occur in Africa. Neighboring African countries ususally do very little to help. They wait for the West to intervene. And sadly most AA don't give a damn about Africa that's why so few care to talk about it. You are the lone voice crying out the desert my friend.

Good luck with that!

Level 8

Since: Aug 09

Saint Louis, MO

#6 Jul 29, 2013
Putin cannot be stopped

Show trials of dissidents apparently have no negative impact on Putin, with the West largely muted in response, writes Gamal Nkrumah

The West knows all too well that the “Russian Bear” has not lost its claws. Nor has the Russian Federation suddenly become a fully-fledged democracy. Russia is still a nation in transition to Western-style multi-party democracy. Incidents such as the guilty verdict on 18 July of Russian anti-corruption activist and blogger Alexei Navalny and his subsequent release on bail only serve as a reminder that the West has no economic, military or political clout to influence events in Russia. Moreover, it makes nonsense of Western policy on Moscow. The Russian Bear is a ferocious beast.

Against that background, a more redoubtable Russian President Vladimir Putin becomes simultaneously a trap as well as an opportunity. He has an iron grip on his great country. Navalny’s conviction was inevitable and predictable. He was heading for the prestigious position of Mayor of Moscow, and Putin did not approve.

The Navalny incident was reminiscent of the arrest a decade ago of the Russian billionaire dissident oil-tycoon Mikhail Khodorkovsky.“You cannot swim against the inexorable flow of history. The era of unbelief and indifference is ending. Everyone who refuses to slander for the sake of his own wellbeing, who is not afraid to stand as a one-man picket line, and who does not let us forget about the 12 chance kids sitting in a cage, is doing something to make our country a better place. There is a name for that — it’s called patriotism,” wrote an incensed Khodorkovsky on his website.

There is an air of déja vu in Moscow. After the Yukos Oil Company was bankrupted, Khodorkovsky was convicted of fraud and sent to prison. He, too, like Navalny, had political ambitions and Putin viewed him as a political threat.

The balance of power between Russia and the West has been shifting in Moscow’s favour. And a majority of Russians credit Putin for the strategic feat. They are not particularly enamoured with the prospect of becoming a replica of the West. Navalny and Khodorkovsky are seen as aping Western politicians and subscribing to Western political values. Yukos was one of the biggest and most successful Russian companies in 2000-03. Khodorkovsky was not loyal to Putin. He had to be politically sidelined. In 2003, following a tax reassessment, the Russian government presented Yukos with a series of tax claims that amounted to $27 billion. As Yukos’s assets were frozen by the Russian government, Yukos was unable to pay.

The Bolotnaya Square affair is another case in point. Again it was proof that Putin had no intention of permitting politically ambitious Russians to throw their weight around. The Bolotnaya Square case was deemed a criminal case by the Investigative Committee of the Russian Federation on counts of alleged mass riot — Article 212 of the Russian Criminal Code — and alleged violence against police — Article 318 of the Russian Criminal Code — during the “March of Millions” of 6 May 2012. Putin’s bellicose posturing, and the subservience of Russia’s ruling clique, does nothing to diminish the Russian president’s standing on the international stage.

Read more here: http://weekly.ahram.org.eg/News/3487/19/Putin...

Level 8

Since: Aug 09

Saint Louis, MO

#7 Jul 29, 2013
McAlister73 wrote:
<quoted text>
Pan-Africanism seems to be all talk. There is less solidarity among Africans than any other group. Look at all the tragedies and famine that occur in Africa. Neighboring African countries ususally do very little to help. They wait for the West to intervene. And sadly most AA don't give a damn about Africa that's why so few care to talk about it. You are the lone voice crying out the desert my friend.
Good luck with that!
Every one of those problems you mention, not one was caused by Pan-Africanism of Pan-Africanists. They were all caused by foreign rule and domination. We had exactly the same problems in India when the British left, or rather when the British got kicked out. India like Africa has been Blessed with immense natural resources. But when the Brits were first kicked out people were starving. They had been starving during the whole time of British domination. It took time to clean up the mess that the British had created. But now, we no longer see starvation in India. As a matter of fact, India is one of the most powerful and richest countries on earth right behind China. And Africa is rapidly becoming even greater than China. The highest rates of economic growth and expansion are all in Africa. Eritrea. Angola. South Africa. Just to name a few. They all have growth rates better than anything in Europe or Asia or any place else.

Level 8

Since: Aug 09

Saint Louis, MO

#8 Jul 29, 2013
McAlister73 wrote:
<quoted text>
Pan-Africanism seems to be all talk. There is less solidarity among Africans than any other group. Look at all the tragedies and famine that occur in Africa. Neighboring African countries ususally do very little to help. They wait for the West to intervene. And sadly most AA don't give a damn about Africa that's why so few care to talk about it. You are the lone voice crying out the desert my friend.
Good luck with that!
Good thing you responded because if nobody takes an interest in discussing the most important affairs that affect this community, I was going to call for shutting this stupid forum down. If we cannot discuss Pan-Africanism it is because we have too many sex perverts and white racists here.

Level 4

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#9 Jul 29, 2013
Kenya's Jomo Kenyatta, Tanzania's Julius Nyerere, and Ghana's Kwame Nkrumah were all talking big shoit in the late 50's and early 60's. About African unity and radical change etc. 50 years later, what has come of it???? Nuthing! What does that tell you??

When will you learn? Don't be a fool waiting on a race of people. Screw them! Be your own man and go out get for your self!

Level 4

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#10 Jul 29, 2013
Abdurratln wrote:
<quoted text>
Good thing you responded because if nobody takes an interest in discussing the most important affairs that affect this community, I was going to call for shutting this stupid forum down. If we cannot discuss Pan-Africanism it is because we have too many sex perverts and white racists here.
I don't beleive that the succes of some Arican countries is the result of Pan Africanism. I mean there is so much involved. And I will say even if I taunt you incessantly, I do find your concern for Africa and Pan Africanism quite admirable.

As for the others, we really can't say whether they are perverts, or white racists. We really don't know who or what they are. They could be robots and this forum part of experiement to see how certain individuals respond to various ideas and types of antagonism. I mean who knows?

Level 8

Since: Aug 09

Saint Louis, MO

#11 Jul 29, 2013
McAlister73 wrote:
Kenya's Jomo Kenyatta, Tanzania's Julius Nyerere, and Ghana's Kwame Nkrumah were all talking big shoit in the late 50's and early 60's. About African unity and radical change etc. 50 years later, what has come of it???? Nuthing! What does that tell you??
It tells me that you are an ignorant idiot. You do not see what's going on around you. Pan-Africanism has never been stronger than it is right now.
McAlister73 wrote:
When will you learn? Don't be a fool waiting on a race of people. Screw them! Be your own man and go out get for your self!
The more I do for the African Nation, the better things become for me. That self-centered selfishness and egotism is a European ideology. It does not work for white people and we do not need it in Africa

Level 8

Since: Aug 09

Saint Louis, MO

#12 Jul 29, 2013
McAlister73 wrote:
<quoted text>
I don't beleive that the succes of some Arican countries is the result of Pan Africanism. I mean there is so much involved. And I will say even if I taunt you incessantly, I do find your concern for Africa and Pan Africanism quite admirable.
As for the others, we really can't say whether they are perverts, or white racists. We really don't know who or what they are. They could be robots and this forum part of experiement to see how certain individuals respond to various ideas and types of antagonism. I mean who knows?
If a robot keeps messing with me, I will strike back one way or the other because it is a robot, it had to be programed to mess with me. So if I curse it out, I am cursing the person who programed it.

Level 8

Since: Aug 09

Saint Louis, MO

#13 Jul 29, 2013

Level 8

Since: Aug 09

Saint Louis, MO

#14 Jul 30, 2013
Black Pastors: Gay Rights Not Same as Civil Rights

http://www.youtube.com/watch...

The Rev. Billy Owens, Chairman of the Coalition of African American Pastors, says that claims by the gay marriage proponents that they are fighting the same fight as the African American Civil Rights movement of decades ago are just plain wrong. Gays can have any job, attend any school, sit where they want on the bus and enjoy all America has to offer. Hear Rev. Owens tell Tim Constantine exactly why Gay Marriage is not a civil right.

Level 8

Since: Aug 09

Saint Louis, MO

#15 Jul 30, 2013
Libya, Getting it Right: A Revolutionary Pan-African Perspective
Wed, 03/02/2011 - 03:05 — Gerald A. Perreira
Libya | Khadafi Pan-Africanist | counter-revolution in Libya
Printer-friendly version
by Gerald A. Perreira
The conflict in Libya is not a revolution, but a counter-revolution. The struggle “is fundamentally a battle between Pan-African forces on the one hand, who are dedicated to the realization of Qaddafi's vision of a united Africa, and reactionary racist Libyan Arab forces who reject Qaddafi's vision of Libya as part of a united Africa.” The so-called Black African “mercenaries” are misnamed.“As a result of Libya's support for liberation movements throughout Africa and the world, international battalions were formed” which are part of the Libyan armed forces.
Libya, Getting it Right: A Revolutionary Pan-African Perspective
by Gerald A. Perreira
“The media and their selected commentators have done their best to manufacture an opinion that Libya is essentially the same as Egypt and Tunisia.”
Thousands of Indians, Egyptians, Chinese, Filipinos, Turks, Germans, English, Italians, Malaysians, Koreans and a host of other nationalities are lining up at the borders and the airport to leave Libya. It begs the question: What were they doing in Libya in the first place? Unemployment figures, according to the Western media and Al Jazeera, are at 30%. If this is so, then why all these foreign workers?
For those of us who have lived and worked in Libya, there are many complexities to the current situation that have been completely overlooked by the Western media and 'Westoxicated' analysts, who have nothing other than a Eurocentric perspective to draw on. Let us be clear - there is no possibility of understanding what is happening in Libya within a Eurocentric framework. Westerners are incapable of understanding a system unless the system emanates from or is attached in some way to the West. Libya's system and the battle now taking place on its soil, stands completely outside of the Western imagination.
News coverage by the BBC, CNN and Al Jazeera has been oversimplified and misleading. An array of anti-Qaddafi spokespersons, most living outside Libya, have been paraded in front of us – each one clearly a counter-revolutionary and less credible than the last. Despite the clear and irrefutable evidence from the beginning of these protests that Muammar Qaddafi had considerable support both inside Libya and internationally, not one pro-Qaddafi voice has been allowed to air. The media and their selected commentators have done their best to manufacture an opinion that Libya is essentially the same as Egypt and Tunisia and that Qaddafi is just another tyrant amassing large sums of money in Swiss bank accounts. But no matter how hard they try, they cannot make Qaddafi into a Mubarak or Libya into Egypt.
“Libya's system and the battle now taking place on its soil, stands completely outside of the Western imagination.”
The first question is: Is the revolt taking place in Libya fuelled by a concern over economic issues such as poverty and unemployment as the media would have us believe? Let us examine the facts.
Under the revolutionary leadership of Muammar Qaddafi, Libya has attained the highest standard of living in Africa. In 2007, in an article which appeared in the African Executive Magazine, Norah Owaraga noted that Libya,“unlike other oil producing countries such as Nigeria and Saudi Arabia, utilized the revenue from its oil to develop its country. The standard of living of the people of Libya is one of the highest in Africa, falling in the category

http://blackagendareport.com/content/libya-ge...

Level 8

Since: Aug 09

Saint Louis, MO

#16 Aug 1, 2013
Uncle Morsi sold out and got kicked out. He underestimated the intelligence and the courage of the Egyptian people. Now he must pay the price: http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/middle_ea... ;

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