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21 - 40 of 119 Comments Last updated May 9, 2013

“Yes WE Can! Yes we Will!”

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Since: Jul 07

Baltimore, Md.

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#21
May 5, 2013
 
Brainiac2 wrote:
African-American music
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African-American...
rap, rock, jazz, blues, ragtime,
BTW
The banjo is African.
Latin American blacks also contributed in Latin America. Why the astonishment?
Much of Latin America has a large African population--sometime proportionaly larger than the African population of the USA.
If your consider OUR influence on the music of the USA, it would surprising indeed if countries like Brazil, Cuba, Dminican Republic, Venezuela and other Latin countries didn't show a strong African influence.
UruEuWauWau

Brazil

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#22
May 5, 2013
 
Savant wrote:
<quoted text>
Much of Latin America has a large African population--sometime proportionaly larger than the African population of the USA.
If your consider OUR influence on the music of the USA, it would surprising indeed if countries like Brazil, Cuba, Dminican Republic, Venezuela and other Latin countries didn't show a strong African influence.
I bet ya're one of those Yank Blacks/AAs/IViggers, or Yanks in general, who believe Samba & Capoeira both origin8d in Rio & are of Afro-BRA origin. ;-) When in reality Argentine Tango is closer to Angolan Semba than originally NE.Bramerindian Samba will ever be. ;-D
Tick Tock

Corona, CA

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#23
May 5, 2013
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch...

general sound of the type african music i heard a long time ago. But this is more recent music I assume.

Since: May 10

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#24
May 5, 2013
 

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Savant wrote:
<quoted text>
Much of Latin America has a large African population--sometime proportionaly larger than the African population of the USA.
If your consider OUR influence on the music of the USA, it would surprising indeed if countries like Brazil, Cuba, Dminican Republic, Venezuela and other Latin countries didn't show a strong African influence.
They are a minority in most Latin American countries where the numbers dip as low as 1%.
UruEuWauWau

Brazil

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#25
May 5, 2013
 
Tick Tock wrote:
.../watch?v=lj8WxLMEZ-s
general sound of the type african music i heard a long time ago. But this is more recent music I assume.
It's a modern C.African dance from Congo area, w/ a lot of L.American influences. ;-) If ya really wanna know 'bout the origin of many C.African music styles, simply research it better. ;-D There's a strong Latin & L.American cultural influence in C., SW. & SE.Africa. ;-)

“Yes WE Can! Yes we Will!”

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#26
May 5, 2013
 
UruEuWauWau wrote:
<quoted text>
I bet ya're one of those Yank Blacks/AAs/IViggers, or Yanks in general, who believe Samba & Capoeira both origin8d in Rio & are of Afro-BRA origin. ;-) When in reality Argentine Tango is closer to Angolan Semba than originally NE.Bramerindian Samba will ever be. ;-D
My statement meant what it said: Goven the large presence of African peoples in many Latin countries, the African influence in Latin music quite to be expected.
I said nothing specifically about Tango, Semba or anything else.

“mariposaoro.word press.com”

Since: Aug 10

London, England

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#27
May 5, 2013
 

“mariposaoro.word press.com”

Since: Aug 10

London, England

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#28
May 5, 2013
 
UruEuWauWau wrote:
<quoted text>
Nop, it's a mixture of various rhythms, amongst which even those of African origin. ;-D Neither Salsa no Merengue are really African, Rumba is much closer, though. ;-)
Whilst I agree about Rumba,Merengue is very African sounding and so is PUNTA from Honduras/Belize/Costa Rica....

Here is another Salsa song:
http://www.youtube.com/watch...

PUNTA:
http://www.youtube.com/watch... ,

http://www.youtube.com/watch...

“Freedom”

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Since: Jan 10

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#29
May 5, 2013
 
Tick Tock wrote:
Besides the reggaeton, I noticed some new latino songs today are sounding like some of the African music that I've heard way in the past. Just an observation.
Many Instruments from Latin America came from Africa hence the similar sounds but Latin music still have their own distinctive sound & the salsa dancing is also distinctive as well.

“Freedom”

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#30
May 5, 2013
 
The African dances in America may have been INFLUENCED by 'Capoeira' which has it's roots in Angola & The Kongo.
Tick Tock

Corona, CA

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#31
May 5, 2013
 
UruEuWauWau wrote:
<quoted text>
It' http://www.youtube.com/watch... s a modern C.African dance from Congo area, w/ a lot of L.American influences. ;-) If ya really wanna know 'bout the origin of many C.African music styles, simply research it better. ;-D There's a strong Latin & L.American cultural influence in C., SW. & SE.Africa. ;-)
U mean rumba is the influence....and the influence of rumba is african drumming. They used alot traditional sounds of African music esepcially congolese sounds, mixed Afro cuban sounds and Haitian sounds.
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
African
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
but now evolved into it's different and unique sound. All fusions of Africa.
Tick Tock

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#32
May 5, 2013
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch... Rumba

http://www.youtube.com/watch... African

All fusions of African sounds. Mainly congolese, and then afro latin sounds.

“Freedom”

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#33
May 5, 2013
 
More on Cuban INFLUENCE from Africa

Clave is a Spanish word and its musical usage as a pattern played on claves was developed in the western part of Cuba, particularly the cities of Matanzas and Havana. Some writings have claimed that the clave patterns originated in Cuba. One frequently repeated theory is that the triple-pulse African bell patterns morphed into duple-pulse forms as a result of the influence of European musical sensibilities. "The duple meter feel [of 4/4 rumba clave] may have been the result of the influence of marching bands and other Spanish styles ..."— Washburne (1995).

However, the duple-pulse forms have existed in sub-Saharan Africa for centuries. The patterns the Cubans call clave are two of the most common bell parts used in Sub-Saharan African music traditions. Natalie Curtis, A.M. Jones, Anthony King and John Collins document the triple-pulse forms of what we call “son clave” and “rumba clave” in West, Central and East Africa. Francis Kofi and C.K. Ladzekpo document several Ghanaian rhythms that use the triple or duple-pulse forms of "son clave." Royal Harington identifies the duple-pulse form of "rumba clave" as a bell pattern used by the Yoruba and Ibo of Nigeria, West Africa. There are many recordings of traditional African music where one can hear the five-stroke "clave" used as a bell pattern.
Tick Tock

Corona, CA

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#34
May 5, 2013
 
Redefined wrote:
More on Cuban INFLUENCE from Africa
Clave is a Spanish word and its musical usage as a pattern played on claves was developed in the western part of Cuba, particularly the cities of Matanzas and Havana. Some writings have claimed that the clave patterns originated in Cuba. One frequently repeated theory is that the triple-pulse African bell patterns morphed into duple-pulse forms as a result of the influence of European musical sensibilities. "The duple meter feel [of 4/4 rumba clave] may have been the result of the influence of marching bands and other Spanish styles ..."— Washburne (1995).
However, the duple-pulse forms have existed in sub-Saharan Africa for centuries. The patterns the Cubans call clave are two of the most common bell parts used in Sub-Saharan African music traditions. Natalie Curtis, A.M. Jones, Anthony King and John Collins document the triple-pulse forms of what we call “son clave” and “rumba clave” in West, Central and East Africa. Francis Kofi and C.K. Ladzekpo document several Ghanaian rhythms that use the triple or duple-pulse forms of "son clave." Royal Harington identifies the duple-pulse form of "rumba clave" as a bell pattern used by the Yoruba and Ibo of Nigeria, West Africa. There are many recordings of traditional African music where one can hear the five-stroke "clave" used as a bell pattern.
Good read. Interesting.....
Tick Tock

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#35
May 5, 2013
 
http://latinmusic.about.com/od/basics101/a/La...

Like this page says, the African musical influence is the largest element in Latin music. But not to take away from the Spanish influence.

“Freedom”

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Since: Jan 10

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#36
May 5, 2013
 
Tick Tock wrote:
<quoted text>
U mean rumba is the influence....and the influence of rumba is african drumming. They used alot traditional sounds of African music esepcially congolese sounds, mixed Afro cuban sounds and Haitian sounds.
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
African
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
but now evolved into it's different and unique sound. All fusions of Africa.
Isn't this sound called Soukous??
Afro4Life

London, UK

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#37
May 5, 2013
 
UruEuWauWau wrote:
<quoted text>
It's a modern C.African dance from Congo area, w/ a lot of L.American influences. ;-) If ya really wanna know 'bout the origin of many C.African music styles, simply research it better. ;-D There's a strong Latin & L.American cultural influence in C., SW. & SE.Africa. ;-)
My dear, You are so wrong. lol.
It is actually the other way round. That music track is a very OLD Congolese music and dancestep that has been there for Milennia. The transfer of music and rhythms are fundamentally African to Latin music and NOT the other way round.
Afro4Life

London, UK

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#38
May 5, 2013
 

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http://www.youtube.com/watch...

History of Salsa
loose change

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#39
May 5, 2013
 

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UruEuWauWau wrote:
<quoted text>
I bet ya're one of those Yank Blacks/AAs/IViggers, or Yanks in general, who believe Samba & Capoeira both origin8d in Rio & are of Afro-BRA origin. ;-) When in reality Argentine Tango is closer to Angolan Semba than originally NE.Bramerindian Samba will ever be. ;-D
You wouldn't know an African rhythm if it hit you in the ears, guess you are one of those who will think the pyramids were built by Europeans, most modern popular music have some African rhythms, lern to jive in the meantime.

“Freedom”

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#40
May 5, 2013
 
Afro4Life wrote:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =HtJKDvhA7YM
History of Salsa
Interesting! The music from Nigeria sound very similar too Afro-Cuban music.
http://www.youtube.com/watch...

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