Name Mangling

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Ramapithecus Giganticus

Harrisburg, PA

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#1
Nov 19, 2012
 
Why is it that here in the USA so many people take pleasure in purposefully mispronouncing what they perceive as foreign names. Even when the name is well-known as is the case with celebrities and sports stars you can hear it. Is it to reinforce a sense of cultural superiority? I mean, the decent thing to do is to ask if unsure and if you are an announcer to make sure.

Giusepi Giovani Ubaldini

Harrisburg, PA

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#3
Nov 19, 2012
 
test wrote:
tewt
VPLVDC
Ramapithecus Giganticus

Harrisburg, PA

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#5
Nov 19, 2012
 
Blaqp0wa wrote:
Just to sound ignorant. They are prob black (ignorant) or just young kids.
Get over it.
No, they are AA and Anglo American adults. These include radio and tv announcers, school teachers, college professors, clerks and everything in between. As for getting over it, if that means accepting and responding to purposefully garbled obscene souunds that are supposedly my name that isn't going to happen any time soon.
Frying Your Brains

Harrisburg, PA

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#7
Nov 19, 2012
 
Blaqp0wa wrote:
<quoted text>
Is it because of your race? HAHAHA you coloreds love to play pity
people pronounce russian, german, etc. names wrong all the time. you're not special because you're brown
Brown isn't a race imbecile.

“cyanotype filter”

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#8
Nov 20, 2012
 

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It's all about one's native language. One begins to learn *immediately* by hearing and listening to others talking to pronounce vowels, consonants, and combinations of those sounds (words) in a certain way-- like English, or any other language.

Some people have a talent, like I do, for learning languages other than their first... others just don't. For example, I was asked to tutor students,*by* a large group of students, in college on how to pronounce German,*especially* a German "z" (which sounds like a combination of the English "t" and "s"). I came up with using the word "pizza" as a pronunciation example. When they had trouble correctly pronouncing a German word with a "z" in it, especially at the *beginning* of a word like "zeit", I would have them start with the first half of "pizza" and immediately go into "zeit", so it sounded like "pizzeit" (*peets*eit), and then practice dropping the "pizz (peets)" part and just say "zeit (tsit, with a long i, like "height")". Many of my "pronunciation pupils" took to it like a duck to water after practice, and could pronounce *any* German "z"; others *still* had trouble.{Yes, I'm proud of my "pizza" idea.}

It all comes down to the different talents of different people.

You can't just blame people's pronunciation,*even* after they're corrected. Some just *can't* do it, or can't do it for a *long* time. It's not their fault.

Like I said, it's a *talent* to be able to simply and correctly pronounce foreign / unfamiliar words / vowels / consonants. Try to be a bit more understanding.
gibs me dat

UK

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#9
Nov 20, 2012
 
Lady Greensleeves wrote:
It's all about one's native language. One begins to learn *immediately* by hearing and listening to others talking to pronounce vowels, consonants, and combinations of those sounds (words) in a certain way-- like English, or any other language.
Some people have a talent, like I do, for learning languages other than their first... others just don't. For example, I was asked to tutor students,*by* a large group of students, in college on how to pronounce German,*especially* a German "z" (which sounds like a combination of the English "t" and "s"). I came up with using the word "pizza" as a pronunciation example. When they had trouble correctly pronouncing a German word with a "z" in it, especially at the *beginning* of a word like "zeit", I would have them start with the first half of "pizza" and immediately go into "zeit", so it sounded like "pizzeit" (*peets*eit), and then practice dropping the "pizz (peets)" part and just say "zeit (tsit, with a long i, like "height")". Many of my "pronunciation pupils" took to it like a duck to water after practice, and could pronounce *any* German "z"; others *still* had trouble.{Yes, I'm proud of my "pizza" idea.}
It all comes down to the different talents of different people.
You can't just blame people's pronunciation,*even* after they're corrected. Some just *can't* do it, or can't do it for a *long* time. It's not their fault.
Like I said, it's a *talent* to be able to simply and correctly pronounce foreign / unfamiliar words / vowels / consonants. Try to be a bit more understanding.
how does that help the sooties who always say -

.
Plaskit
Axe
ise done nuttin
gibs
glubbs
?

“cyanotype filter”

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#10
Nov 20, 2012
 

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gibs me dat wrote:
<quoted text>how does that help the sooties who always say -

.
Plaskit
Axe
ise done nuttin
gibs
glubbs
?
I was talking about foreign languages, not English pronounced very badly, or Ebonics.:) Those who actually speak in that manner all of the time could use *English* tutoring.
Ramapithecus Giganticus

Harrisburg, PA

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#11
Nov 20, 2012
 

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Lady Greensleeves wrote:
It's all about one's native language. One begins to learn *immediately* by hearing and listening to others talking to pronounce vowels, consonants, and combinations of those sounds (words) in a certain way-- like English, or any other language.
Some people have a talent, like I do, for learning languages other than their first... others just don't. For example, I was asked to tutor students,*by* a large group of students, in college on how to pronounce German,*especially* a German "z" (which sounds like a combination of the English "t" and "s"). I came up with using the word "pizza" as a pronunciation example. When they had trouble correctly pronouncing a German word with a "z" in it, especially at the *beginning* of a word like "zeit", I would have them start with the first half of "pizza" and immediately go into "zeit", so it sounded like "pizzeit" (*peets*eit), and then practice dropping the "pizz (peets)" part and just say "zeit (tsit, with a long i, like "height")". Many of my "pronunciation pupils" took to it like a duck to water after practice, and could pronounce *any* German "z"; others *still* had trouble.{Yes, I'm proud of my "pizza" idea.}
It all comes down to the different talents of different people.
You can't just blame people's pronunciation,*even* after they're corrected. Some just *can't* do it, or can't do it for a *long* time. It's not their fault.
Like I said, it's a *talent* to be able to simply and correctly pronounce foreign / unfamiliar words / vowels / consonants. Try to be a bit more understanding.
So angrily a refusing to pronounce right even when told is just inability? Or calling you up on the phone after being corrected and angrily shouting the garbled pronounciation to make sure you understand it's on purpose, or newscasters garbling well-known famous names to make them sound obcsene are all simply unintentional? Wow! Thanks! Could have fooled me! Gee!

“cyanotype filter”

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#12
Nov 20, 2012
 
Ramapithecus Giganticus wrote:
<quoted text>So angrily a refusing to pronounce right even when told is just inability? Or calling you up on the phone after being corrected and angrily shouting the garbled pronounciation to make sure you understand it's on purpose, or newscasters garbling well-known famous names to make them sound obcsene are all simply unintentional? Wow! Thanks! Could have fooled me! Gee!
I honestly have *no* idea what you're blathering on about, nor do I have any inclination to puzzle it out, if that's even possible. Sorry.
Sunahara Yamamoto

Harrisburg, PA

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#13
Nov 20, 2012
 
Lady Greensleeves wrote:
<quoted text>
I honestly have *no* idea what you're blathering on about, nor do I have any inclination to puzzle it out, if that's even possible. Sorry.
Which words don't you understand so I can translate.
running with scissors

Denton, TX

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#14
Nov 20, 2012
 
I will obviously not put my surname on here- but it is spelled as it was as an old English word- such as "olde" was for old. When people see it they always try to make it complicated and pronounce it like it's German or something, putting in letter sounds that aren't even there.
running with scissors

Denton, TX

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#15
Nov 20, 2012
 
I will add though that this has always been done with my name as people read it and before I tell them how it is pronounced.
gibs me dat

UK

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#16
Nov 20, 2012
 
Lady Greensleeves wrote:
<quoted text>
I was talking about foreign languages, not English pronounced very badly, or Ebonics.:) Those who actually speak in that manner all of the time could use *English* tutoring.
blacks can't even "pernounce" one language, let alone learn another. They make a similar mess out of French when that is their birth language.
Anonymous

United States

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#17
Nov 20, 2012
 
Because of my name I get confused as a chinese woman until I walk up to the person calling my name. Been told that several times!

“cyanotype filter”

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#18
Nov 20, 2012
 
Sunahara Yamamoto wrote:
<quoted text>Which words don't you understand so I can translate.
I never said that I didn't understand his post (or at least get the gist of what he was saying- his grammar was so atrocious; I said that he was *blathering*(talking long-windedly without making very much sense). I was referring, in particular, to this "sentence":
Ramapithecus Giganticus wrote:
<quoted text>So angrily a refusing to pronounce right even when told is just inability?
That "sentence" is worse than *any* sentence computed by the cheapest of language translators, from Afrikaans to Yiddish, into that abomination of a sentence that can *only* be called "English" because it uses words in the English Vernacular. LoL.:)

“cyanotype filter”

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#19
Nov 20, 2012
 
Sunahara Yamamoto wrote:
<quoted text>Which words don't you understand so I can translate.
LoL... you're even the same person, just under a different moniker, "Mr. Harrisburg, PA".-smh-
XYXYXYXY

Harrisburg, PA

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#20
Nov 20, 2012
 
I type with a pointer on an on-screen keyboard and sheer exhaustion from that struggle makes me become sloppy sometimes. What's your excuse for fouling up in basic grammar?

Let me show you.

Your first mistake is not finishing the sentence below with a period.

I never said that I didn't understand his post (or at least get the gist of what he was saying-

Your second mistake is not capitalizing the "h" in the word "his". Umm, it begins a new sentence. You know?

...his grammar was so...

Your third mistake is using a semicolon instead of a period after the word "atrocious". That word ends a sentence and declarative sentences-endings require a period. Other options are questioon marks or exclamation marks. But never a colon or semicolon. This is grammar school basic stuff!

...atrocious;

Based on those basic errors, I really don't see how you qualify to correct grammar when you obviously don't know it yourself.
XYXYXYXY

Harrisburg, PA

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#21
Nov 20, 2012
 
question marks
Buck Toothed Billy

Harrisburg, PA

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#22
Nov 20, 2012
 
Lady Greensleeves wrote:
<quoted text>
I was talking about foreign languages, not English pronounced very badly, or Ebonics.:) Those who actually speak in that manner all of the time could use *English* tutoring.
The problem with that recommendation is that you are in serious need of English tutoring yourself. LOL!
Truth is Bitter

Harrisburg, PA

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#23
Nov 20, 2012
 
Lady Greensleeves wrote:
It's all about one's native language. One begins to learn *immediately* by hearing and listening to others talking to pronounce vowels, consonants, and combinations of those sounds (words) in a certain way-- like English, or any other language.
Some people have a talent, like I do, for learning languages other than their first... others just don't. For example, I was asked to tutor students,*by* a large group of students, in college on how to pronounce German,*especially* a German "z" (which sounds like a combination of the English "t" and "s"). I came up with using the word "pizza" as a pronunciation example. When they had trouble correctly pronouncing a German word with a "z" in it, especially at the *beginning* of a word like "zeit", I would have them start with the first half of "pizza" and immediately go into "zeit", so it sounded like "pizzeit" (*peets*eit), and then practice dropping the "pizz (peets)" part and just say "zeit (tsit, with a long i, like "height")". Many of my "pronunciation pupils" took to it like a duck to water after practice, and could pronounce *any* German "z"; others *still* had trouble.{Yes, I'm proud of my "pizza" idea.}
It all comes down to the different talents of different people.
You can't just blame people's pronunciation,*even* after they're corrected. Some just *can't* do it, or can't do it for a *long* time. It's not their fault.
Like I said, it's a *talent* to be able to simply and correctly pronounce foreign / unfamiliar words / vowels / consonants. Try to be a bit more understanding.
I wasn't just blaming their pronunciation simpleton. In any case, you need tutoring in basic English so your pompous self praises and claims to expertise must either be bogus or you are suffering from megalomaniacal delusions of grandeur.

Example of nonsensical sentence:

One begins to learn *immediately* by hearing and listening to others talking to pronounce vowels,

Examples of faulty punctuation via omission of periods.

Some people have a talent, like I do, for learning languages other than their first...

others *still* had trouble

There are other grammatical mistakes but I'm not on this forum to provide free classes in basic English composition. My suggestion is that you avail yourself of remedial classes offered at some community college where such basics are taught for students who didn't pay attention in the lower grades. One thing is for sure, pontificating as if you know what you are doing isn't going to fix the problem

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