Dark Skin Documentary on Oprah Network

Dark Skin Documentary on Oprah Network

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ElsaK90

Stevens Point, WI

#1 Jun 24, 2013
I watched the Dark Skin Documentary on Oprah Network last night. I am so sorry, I had no idea Dark Skin Black Women had it so ruff. Now I understand why Black Men don't want them and they are the least likely to get married. It stated that 41% of Black Women will never marry is it because the majority of them are dark and Black guys don't fine dark skin attractive. I don't understand that behavior because the Black Men they interviewed were dark skin and they were not attractive but I assume they could get women. Most of the Black guys they interviewed looked like bums homeless guys how could they get a girlfriend but dark skin women cannot get men.

There was some hope because they had a couple of White guys on there that were married to dark skin Black Women and one brought up a very good point that they never answered. He said he work with Hip Hop artist and they claim they are pro Black but only use Light and other non-Black Women in their videos, why is that? Also now I understand why Black Women are so bitter and angry all the time, it's because they think they are not as attractive as other women. I had no idea the Black race was so screwed up and it's because of slavery. Slavery is something I don't understand because my parents came to this country in the 70s from Czechoslovakia, well when it was call Czechoslovakia and we did not have a history of Black slavery. I was told by my parents not to associate with the Blacks because they like to steel. I believed that until I met a good friend of mine and she was a Dark Skin Black Women and she did not steel and was she mean and rude but she did have trouble finding a date and I never understood why until now. Hopeful we can talk about this and I can show her that I understand her pain and where she is coming from now.
Rich Girl

New Orleans, LA

#3 Jun 24, 2013
Maybe this will open up the dialog in our community about colorism and his effects on the black community.
Spit-Fire

Tucker, GA

#5 Jun 24, 2013
I actually have a completely different viewpoint of what I watched last night.

Colorism is a very real issue in the BC, but it also revealed how this affects other people of color as well. The Korean young lady who shared her story and the man giving his examples of colorism in the Dominican Republic.

This issue has to be pushed to the forefront . It has to be continually exposed so that you can fix it. If you shed light on it, the roaches will have to scatter. This is how the healing begins.

How anyone can watch that and see those young women at the end affirming themselves and think that it was negative, is beyond me.

Self-esteem, self-respect, self-worth, etc, have to come from SELF FIRST. That was the message they were trying to hammer home.

So what if other think/say negative things. What do you THINK about yourself?

Love you first, others will also. Most BW are already there, or else we simply all would have committed suicide decades ago.( We have the lowest suicide rates in the country).

The ending....Dark Girls...RISE....!!!!!

Keep rising, our time as BW is now!
Lisa

United States

#6 Jun 24, 2013
Black girl wrote:
The film depicted us dark skinned women as victims who hate themselves and as being unable to get a man. This however isn't the case. I'm a gorgeous darkskinned sista and I have no trouble pullin. Yes,most black men do indeed prefer light skinned black women or women of other races,but it's not as if us dark skins don't get approached by bm at all. In my experience, very few actually do approach, but many men of other races approach me regularly so it is not as if we are just left with no options. Bm have been white washed. Period. Dark skin sistas like myself are not sad little victims which can't get a man. The ones who are victms are such because they choose to be victims. We must love ourselves and know our worth or we won't get a man of any race. I give the film a thumbs down. Bill Duke did nothing but perpetuate the myth that bw are lonely,ugly,and desperate but whatever. It is what it is.
Of course you're not responsible for that and what other blacks do. No more than I am and other whites responsible for what happened to your ancestors. You can't go one blaming slavery for everything although some will. There is no one a live today that had anything to do with that. I'm sorry what happened to you're grandfather and great grandfather but again everyone involved in that is long gone. There is plenty of black on white violent crime today, Goes unreported because it's not P.C.. But let a white do something to a black and it hits the fan, And its that bubble standard is one BIG reason for all the hate.

Happy 4th of July..
London

Memphis, TN

#8 Jun 24, 2013
Black girl wrote:
The film depicted us dark skinned women as victims who hate themselves and as being unable to get a man. This however isn't the case. I'm a gorgeous darkskinned sista and I have no trouble pullin. Yes,most black men do indeed prefer light skinned black women or women of other races,but it's not as if us dark skins don't get approached by bm at all. In my experience, very few actually do approach, but many men of other races approach me regularly so it is not as if we are just left with no options. Bm have been white washed. Period. Dark skin sistas like myself are not sad little victims which can't get a man. The ones who are victms are such because they choose to be victims. We must love ourselves and know our worth or we won't get a man of any race. I give the film a thumbs down. Bill Duke did nothing but perpetuate the myth that bw are lonely,ugly,and desperate but whatever. It is what it is.
Excellent post. The documentary failed to do what I thought it set out to do, which is turn the tide on dark bw being seen as undesirable beings sitting in a corner envious of everyone around them. Instead it promoted the negative aspects of being dark and I even question if some of the women portrayed in the documentary would even be considered dark skin ..but rather brown skin. It seemed largely a promotion of undesirable women who all but a couple they showed would probably be deemed undesired by the masses, regardless of shade. It was a very disappointing documentary and after a few minutes of watching it I flipped it off the recorder and pressed delete.

The grade you gave it, imo, is well deserved as the documentary was actually offensive.
London

Memphis, TN

#9 Jun 24, 2013
Spit-Fire wrote:
I actually have a completely different viewpoint of what I watched last night.
Colorism is a very real issue in the BC, but it also revealed how this affects other people of color as well. The Korean young lady who shared her story and the man giving his examples of colorism in the Dominican Republic.
This issue has to be pushed to the forefront . It has to be continually exposed so that you can fix it. If you shed light on it, the roaches will have to scatter. This is how the healing begins.
How anyone can watch that and see those young women at the end affirming themselves and think that it was negative, is beyond me.
Self-esteem, self-respect, self-worth, etc, have to come from SELF FIRST. That was the message they were trying to hammer home.
So what if other think/say negative things. What do you THINK about yourself?
Love you first, others will also. Most BW are already there, or else we simply all would have committed suicide decades ago.( We have the lowest suicide rates in the country).
The ending....Dark Girls...RISE....!!!!!
Keep rising, our time as BW is now!
I will have to check out the ending but I think it was offensive to make a documentary regarding the dark shade but over half of the individuals shown weren't dark skinned (Kelly Rowland is a dark bw) but rather brown skin (and quite honestly not attractive). So, was the documentary trying to highlight the plight of the unattractive in this world? If that's the case, they should have left skin tone out of it completely. However, I will make an honest attempt to watch it again with your perspective in mind but so far it just seemed like the same ole same ole of simply convincing the masses that dark is anything unattractive. And to me, that's racist, not just colorist.
Proudtobeasister

London, UK

#10 Jun 24, 2013
ElsaK90 wrote:
I watched the Dark Skin Documentary on Oprah Network last night. I am so sorry, I had no idea Dark Skin Black Women had it so ruff. Now I understand why Black Men don't want them and they are the least likely to get married. It stated that 41% of Black Women will never marry is it because the majority of them are dark and Black guys don't fine dark skin attractive. I don't understand that behavior because the Black Men they interviewed were dark skin and they were not attractive but I assume they could get women. Most of the Black guys they interviewed looked like bums homeless guys how could they get a girlfriend but dark skin women cannot get men.
There was some hope because they had a couple of White guys on there that were married to dark skin Black Women and one brought up a very good point that they never answered. He said he work with Hip Hop artist and they claim they are pro Black but only use Light and other non-Black Women in their videos, why is that? Also now I understand why Black Women are so bitter and angry all the time, it's because they think they are not as attractive as other women. I had no idea the Black race was so screwed up and it's because of slavery. Slavery is something I don't understand because my parents came to this country in the 70s from Czechoslovakia, well when it was call Czechoslovakia and we did not have a history of Black slavery. I was told by my parents not to associate with the Blacks because they like to steel. I believed that until I met a good friend of mine and she was a Dark Skin Black Women and she did not steel and was she mean and rude but she did have trouble finding a date and I never understood why until now. Hopeful we can talk about this and I can show her that I understand her pain and where she is coming from now.
Yes that's right don't associate with us because we may well also teach you how to spell 'Steal' and not 'steel'.

Do not come up here with your RUBBISH.
morpheous

Stamford, CT

#11 Jun 24, 2013
Lisa wrote:
<quoted text>Of course you're not responsible for that and what other blacks do. No more than I am and other whites responsible for what happened to your ancestors. You can't go one blaming slavery for everything although some will. There is no one a live today that had anything to do with that. I'm sorry what happened to you're grandfather and great grandfather but again everyone involved in that is long gone. There is plenty of black on white violent crime today, Goes unreported because it's not P.C.. But let a white do something to a black and it hits the fan, And its that bubble standard is one BIG reason for all the hate.
Happy 4th of July..
“Get over it” is something White Americans say when black people point out a case of white racism that is hard to deny, like that picture of watermelons growing in front of the White House. The phrase means that blacks should not get too hung up on racism, that thinking about it too much will only make things worse. It also means this: shut up and stop being such a crybaby.

One white person, advised me:

Get over it , stop whining about racism and move to Africa, yep, make a contribution to the motherland.

When whites complain about reverse racism or affirmative action, I do not notice anyone telling them to “Get over it”. Instead their complaints are taken seriously. You know, like they truly matter.

“Get over it” assumes that racism is pretty much over, that it is either dead and gone, ancient history, or at least no longer a big deal.“Get over it!” Blacks are either stuck in the past or making something out of nothing.

“Get over it” assumes that whites are better judges of racism against blacks than blacks themselves! Because blacks are oversensitive, because they are like children who have it too easy and complain about every little thing. And, like children, blacks do not know what is in their own best interest – but white people do, despite their terrible record on that one.

Unlike most racist arguments, this one admits that the case of racism in question is true – otherwise there would be nothing to get over.

That is why it comes up so much in arguments about the White American practice of keeping black slaves: it is one of the few cases of racism that whites cannot deny. They know it was true and know that it was terrible. But they do not see – or want to see – that a society that could allow that to be done to people because of the colour of their skin could allow other bad things to be done to them – even now.

Slave days, Jim Crow and all the rest are ancient history for whites because it does not seem to affect their present. But not for blacks – not because they are unreasonable children who do not know when to let go of the past, but because racism still affects their lives.

Racism did not die on the day they freed the slaves. Racism did not die on the day they outlawed hanging a black man from a tree. Racism did not even die on the day a black man put his hand on the Bible and became president – in fact, it seems to have only made it worse since it was against the wishes of most white voters. Racism is dying, yes, but it still very much alive.

When will blacks “get over it” and “move on”? When whites get over their racism and move on. They created it to excuse their crimes; they can also destroy it.
Proudtobeasister

London, UK

#12 Jun 24, 2013
They system takes advantage of a lot of uneducated black men by using them as weapons against black women.

If they were educated they would see that their thoughts and actions are not their own.

Don't worry there are a lot of us that can see through the game of divide and conquer.

Level 4

Since: May 13

Location hidden

#14 Jun 24, 2013
Proudtobeasister wrote:
They system takes advantage of a lot of uneducated black men by using them as weapons against black women.
If they were educated they would see that their thoughts and actions are not their own.
Don't worry there are a lot of us that can see through the game of divide and conquer.
Great point - it's just that it seems like a vocal minority or overwhelming majority (not sure which one) of black men are indeed part of the pain black women go through.
Proudtobeasister

London, UK

#15 Jun 24, 2013
ElsaK90 wrote:
I watched the Dark Skin Documentary on Oprah Network last night. I am so sorry, I had no idea Dark Skin Black Women had it so ruff. Now I understand why Black Men don't want them and they are the least likely to get married. It stated that 41% of Black Women will never marry is it because the majority of them are dark and Black guys don't fine dark skin attractive. I don't understand that behavior because the Black Men they interviewed were dark skin and they were not attractive but I assume they could get women. Most of the Black guys they interviewed looked like bums homeless guys how could they get a girlfriend but dark skin women cannot get men.
There was some hope because they had a couple of White guys on there that were married to dark skin Black Women and one brought up a very good point that they never answered. He said he work with Hip Hop artist and they claim they are pro Black but only use Light and other non-Black Women in their videos, why is that? Also now I understand why Black Women are so bitter and angry all the time, it's because they think they are not as attractive as other women. I had no idea the Black race was so screwed up and it's because of slavery. Slavery is something I don't understand because my parents came to this country in the 70s from Czechoslovakia, well when it was call Czechoslovakia and we did not have a history of Black slavery. I was told by my parents not to associate with the Blacks because they like to steel. I believed that until I met a good friend of mine and she was a Dark Skin Black Women and she did not steel and was she mean and rude but she did have trouble finding a date and I never understood why until now. Hopeful we can talk about this and I can show her that I understand her pain and where she is coming from now.
Is Mind Control, Social Conditioning, brainwashing, Power of suggestion the new weapon?........used to TRY and distort black peoples self image of themselves in the WEST?
Proudtobeasister

London, UK

#16 Jun 24, 2013
TimeforHonesty wrote:
<quoted text>
Great point - it's just that it seems like a vocal minority or overwhelming majority (not sure which one) of black men are indeed part of the pain black women go through.
Sweet heart.... I am a black woman and i sure ain't in no pain honey. So lets get that one Straight.

Out of curiosity i notice your emphasis on the word PAIN.....are you a black woman?

I ask you this question politely.......because, one can not know what another feels unless you have actually walked in their shoes.

Otherwise its all assumptions.

Now please kindly answer my questions below because i would like to know your thoughts...

Is Mind Control, Social Conditioning, brainwashing, Power of suggestion the new weapon?........used to TRY and distort black peoples self image of themselves in the WEST?

Level 4

Since: May 13

Location hidden

#17 Jun 24, 2013
Proudtobeasister wrote:
<quoted text>
Sweet heart.... I am a black woman and i sure ain't in no pain honey. So lets get that one Straight.
Out of curiosity i notice your emphasis on the word PAIN.....are you a black woman?
I ask you this question politely.......because, one can not know what another feels unless you have actually walked in their shoes.
Otherwise its all assumptions.
Now please kindly answer my questions below because i would like to know your thoughts...
Is Mind Control, Social Conditioning, brainwashing, Power of suggestion the new weapon?........used to TRY and distort black peoples self image of themselves in the WEST?
Noam Chomsky stated that there are two ways to control a people...weapons or propaganda.
Spit-Fire

Tucker, GA

#18 Jun 24, 2013
London wrote:
<quoted text>
I will have to check out the ending but I think it was offensive to make a documentary regarding the dark shade but over half of the individuals shown weren't dark skinned (Kelly Rowland is a dark bw) but rather brown skin (and quite honestly not attractive). So, was the documentary trying to highlight the plight of the unattractive in this world? If that's the case, they should have left skin tone out of it completely. However, I will make an honest attempt to watch it again with your perspective in mind but so far it just seemed like the same ole same ole of simply convincing the masses that dark is anything unattractive. And to me, that's racist, not just colorist.
You're right that quite a few of the women were not Grace Jones "dark". I guess the focus was that they were not light skinned.
As far as watching, I had a very negative mindset and I was emotional. I had to give myself a break and go back with fresh eyes and really listen to what the women and men were saying.
I believe that the tide is turning and status quos are breaking down. I think that this is very timely.
People are trying so hard to keep BW in their place, but things are changing.
Nothing stays the same forever!

“No Substitute For The Truth”

Level 8

Since: Jan 10

United States

#19 Jun 24, 2013
This issue is much bigger than African Americans. Even if there was no colorism within' The AA Community, we all would still be exposed too it through racial systems which associate certain traits with MORE value. I'm sorry but we can't expect to live in a society with a racial system & not expect colorism.

“No Substitute For The Truth”

Level 8

Since: Jan 10

United States

#20 Jun 24, 2013
This documentary does NOT get the root of the issue thus all Oprah is doing is capitalizing off African Americans who has issues with their skin complexion.
Spit-Fire

Tucker, GA

#21 Jun 24, 2013
Redefined wrote:
This documentary does NOT get the root of the issue thus all Oprah is doing is capitalizing off African Americans who has issues with their skin complexion.
How is she capitalizing off of AA who have issues with their complexion? Is she doing it more than rappers?
Did the documentary not start with our history in this country and how colorism took ROOT in the AA race to begin with?

“No Substitute For The Truth”

Level 8

Since: Jan 10

United States

#22 Jun 25, 2013
Spit-Fire wrote:
<quoted text>
How is she capitalizing off of AA who have issues with their complexion?
What exactly is doing to help combat colorism in America?? I've also said the same about shows such as Black in America. It's possible some of the networks get ratings off of others issues or dysfunctional behavior.

“me! chee hoo! LOL!”

Level 6

Since: Oct 09

New Zealand

#24 Jun 25, 2013
Intresting.. Whats the doco called. I like to talk to anyone personally, who experinced discrimnation as a kid.. 4 the color of skin..
Sadbutrue

Woodbridge, VA

#25 Jun 25, 2013
Redefined wrote:
This documentary does NOT get the root of the issue thus all Oprah is doing is capitalizing off African Americans who has issues with their skin complexion.
Maceo

Capitalizing off skin color issue? Aren't you the one that called Black women "Nappy Headed Hoes, bytches & Sl*ts" and said they were "Too dark" to be wanted? To be honest I judge Black men on their Features now, I didn't do that prior to YOU! lmao

All of the Posters on this forum are YOURS!

You knew because your Mother was discriminated against but you proudly supported, love and worship White women for 40 years! You didn't do anything when she had "Cancer" nor did you visit her!

Now you have Black women anxious and running from Black males! They don't want to hear your rants while you put up and chased White women for 40 years; they look at your behaviors and are moving on!

George Lucas Married Mellody Hobson

Whoops Mellody Hobson marries a Billionaire!!!!!!!!!!11 lMAO

May the Force be with them! George Lucas marries Mellody Hobson

Another Black woman marries a Billionaire!

http://www.nypost.com/p/pagesix/may_the_force...

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