Dr. MARTIN L. KING'S LEGACY & the OCC...

“Yes WE Can! Yes we Will!”

Level 8

Since: Jul 07

Baltimore, Md.

#7704 Feb 25, 2014
Timothy wrote:
<quoted text>
Great Question.
I have to take my time on this answer. To end white supremacy (which many of us black people abhor as you realize. I abhor the system of white supremacy too), it will take a multifaceted approach. First, black people have to have a KNOWLEDGE OF SELF (or an understanding that black is beautiful and black is holy). Also, there are other steps that will take time. We have to use radical solutions in our community (from setting up independent businesses, cooperatives, and institute programs to develop our communities here and worldwide). We have to grow our powerbase and we have to challenge unjust laws and policies that are are involved in black oppression. Individual, black people have to embrace a CODE OF CONDUCT to treat black people with respect and fight evil where ever it occurs. Dr. Claud Anderson is right to advocate GROUP ECONOMICS as a means to grow black institutions and economic plus political power. There are other steps too, but there is limited space where I can mention these items. There are tons of black people and organizations that are dedicated to eradication of the system of white supremacy (being replaced with JUSTICE).
I am essentially in agreement with what you're proposing here. i especially want to emphasize the creation of cooperatives simply because they're economic forms which REQUIRE democratic participation and governance in ways not require, or not even possible, with capitalistic enterprises. Some of the programs offered by SNCC and the Black Panther Party can (with some modification in light of contemporary realities) be still relevant and useful. And they can help[ us lessen whyite capitalist economic power over our communities. The only problem is that there must also be changes in the larger society--fundamental changes. Hence our politics--and by politics I don't mean just electoral politics--must also master the art of useful alliances. While I do not share the same degree of animosity toward liberals as does Abdurratin (since the Right is obviously FAR worst), I wold not rely on them when it comes to FUNDAMENTAL social transformation either. And Dr. King himself argued in WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE, CHAOS OR COMMUNITY that the old liberal coalitions were not likely to work any longer. You may recall that he argues that as our movememnt was transitioning from the fight for constitutional rights to the fight for HUMAN RIGHTS (as Malcolm had argued), a new more revolutionary thrust would have to characterize not only the internal politics of the Black struggle, but also the kind of alliances would would have to make in the future. The liberal coalitions under liberal Democrat administrations (which hardly exist any longer) might have been useful during the EARLY phase of the Civil Rights Movement, but not much after. And it is now LONG after. I am interested in both internal Black political and intellectual efforts which have a revolutionary character. And at least a revolutionary potential must be there in the multiracial alliances which we may opt for in the future. I am convionced that Dr. King was right that we need a "radical revolution of values" and a "radical redistributiion of political economic power."

“Yes WE Can! Yes we Will!”

Level 8

Since: Jul 07

Baltimore, Md.

#7705 Feb 25, 2014
Timothy wrote:
<quoted text>
The President Barack Obama is a MODERATE black American President that made huge disappointments among us as black African people. We wanted him to be the revolutionary leader for the inhabitants of the world. Now, we see that he has compromised so much to the reactionary forces that hate black liberation. The good news is that we are not defeated. We can do something about our situation. We can fight BACK AGAINST THE PTB.
He or the President is very reactionary in terms of foreign policy. The NATO destruction of Libya has been an abomination. Black men, black women, and black children being lynched by barbarians (these barbarians were aided by NATO and Western imperialists) are war crimes that I will never forget. The ACA health care law (filled with corporate support) has been watered down and it is not universal health care. Gitmo is still here and wars of aggression are going forward in multiple continents. The brutal reactionaries are far worse than the President, because they want total harm to workers' rights, environmental rights, voting rights, and other HUMAN rights that our people fought for. I will never embrace some irrational hatred of the President as some of the Tea Party/GOP crowd has about, because it is ignorant and it doesn't solve anything. The President's "pragmatic centrism" is not working since we need REVOLUTIONARY CHANGE as a means to make our community stronger.
His memoir DREAMS FROM MY FATHER does show his progressive community organizing history. It is in him. The choice is up to him. We can't force the man to do what is necessary, but we can inspire him and we should fairly evaluate his policies.
It is the plutocratic agenda harming the world. The President is the spokesman of that agenda. So, even he is not to be blamed for all of these things. It is just that there is the continuation of the nefarious policies from Reagan to the present. He or the President ought to be made accountable for his actions though. I have a great respect for the President's wife and his children. I will treat the President as a man for he is a man (he is not a devil nor an angel). He is a human being.
I've read Obama's DREAMS FROM MY FATHER, and it only convinces me (especially in light of his performance since 2008) of the limitatons of politics in this racist capitalist republic. I wonder at times what Obama sees when he looks in the mirror these days, Yes, he was involved with anti-apartheid movement, with Black and Latin student organizing, reading Fanon and critiques of colonialism and neocolonialism, hanging with Marxist profs and supporting women's groups. But that eventually went by the wayside as he became an Establishment politician. But I'm not surprised. I know elder brother warriors whom I used to look up from the old Black Panther Party who are now politicians, and not a whit more progressive than other politicians (though, like Obama, they sometimes fall back on the old progressive rhetoric of Movement days that is still appealing to much of the Black masses). They, like Obama, were expected to be "transformational" leaders and proved to be (or eventually become) transactional politicos. Our people should have been warned when "leaders" after the 1960s began saying that we have to shift the Movement "from the STREETS to the SUITES." A red flag should have gone up immediately. We must fight CLASS and as well as RACE oppression. Yes, wold should opposed right wing racist attacks on Obama and others. But we must hold to the fire the feets of Obama and all other black bourgeois politicians, Our emphasis has to be on POPULAR and grassroots political activity and self-empowerment. And we cannot limit ourselves to electoral politics, but must begin to create new, revolutionary democratic institutions and associations.
Timothy

Norfolk, VA

#7706 Feb 25, 2014
Savant wrote:
<quoted text> I am essentially in agreement with what you're proposing here. i especially want to emphasize the creation of cooperatives simply because they're economic forms which REQUIRE democratic participation and governance in ways not require, or not even possible, with capitalistic enterprises. Some of the programs offered by SNCC and the Black Panther Party can (with some modification in light of contemporary realities) be still relevant and useful. And they can help[ us lessen whyite capitalist economic power over our communities. The only problem is that there must also be changes in the larger society--fundamental changes. Hence our politics--and by politics I don't mean just electoral politics--must also master the art of useful alliances. While I do not share the same degree of animosity toward liberals as does Abdurratin (since the Right is obviously FAR worst), I wold not rely on them when it comes to FUNDAMENTAL social transformation either. And Dr. King himself argued in WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE, CHAOS OR COMMUNITY that the old liberal coalitions were not likely to work any longer. You may recall that he argues that as our movememnt was transitioning from the fight for constitutional rights to the fight for HUMAN RIGHTS (as Malcolm had argued), a new more revolutionary thrust would have to characterize not only the internal politics of the Black struggle, but also the kind of alliances would would have to make in the future. The liberal coalitions under liberal Democrat administrations (which hardly exist any longer) might have been useful during the EARLY phase of the Civil Rights Movement, but not much after. And it is now LONG after. I am interested in both internal Black political and intellectual efforts which have a revolutionary character. And at least a revolutionary potential must be there in the multiracial alliances which we may opt for in the future. I am convionced that Dr. King was right that we need a "radical revolution of values" and a "radical redistributiion of political economic power."
You are right that we need more democratic, economic populist solutions in the world. That action along with cooperatives can do a whole of lot to achieve the revolutionary solution that we all want. I do have hatred of every liberal. I have a great deal of abhorrence of the reactionary agenda as you do. If an independent liberal person or an independent person in general want to fight for justice, revolutionary change, and is sincere, that is fine. There can be legitimate critiques of the establishment Democratic forces, but the reactionaries are far more vicious in their agendas and outlook. If the reactionaries had their way, military strikes possibly could be in Iran and austerity will be much more brutal in American society. Certainly, mainstream capitalism has been an archaic, exploitative system that harmed our black communities (from the growth of the prison industrial complex to the high unemployment rate among our people nationwide. The vicious white establishment capitalist system has been very detrimental to the progress of our people). We do need a radical redistribution of economic and political power as the late democratic socialist Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. have outlined. Fundamentally, revolutionary solutions deals with radical change in the larger society too. You are right on that point. I believe in alliances, but the black liberation struggle should be headed by BLACK PEOPLE alone. Far too often, we have worked with others and then those other people controlled our movement in a unfair, authoritarian fashion. So, we should have our self determination as a means to execute our own BLACK POWER. We can appreciate the diverse cultures of humanity while respecting our black heritage too. We should treat our neighbors as ourselves while loving our BLACK identity at the same time. We certainly agree that revolutionary solutions are needed not fascism or oligarchy.

“Yes WE Can! Yes we Will!”

Level 8

Since: Jul 07

Baltimore, Md.

#7707 Feb 25, 2014
Timothy wrote:
<quoted text>
The President Barack Obama is a MODERATE black American President that made huge disappointments among us as black African people. We wanted him to be the revolutionary leader for the inhabitants of the world. Now, we see that he has compromised so much to the reactionary forces that hate black liberation. The good news is that we are not defeated. We can do something about our situation. We can fight BACK AGAINST THE PTB.
He or the President is very reactionary in terms of foreign policy. The NATO destruction of Libya has been an abomination. Black men, black women, and black children being lynched by barbarians (these barbarians were aided by NATO and Western imperialists) are war crimes that I will never forget. The ACA health care law (filled with corporate support) has been watered down and it is not universal health care. Gitmo is still here and wars of aggression are going forward in multiple continents. The brutal reactionaries are far worse than the President, because they want total harm to workers' rights, environmental rights, voting rights, and other HUMAN rights that our people fought for. I will never embrace some irrational hatred of the President as some of the Tea Party/GOP crowd has about, because it is ignorant and it doesn't solve anything. The President's "pragmatic centrism" is not working since we need REVOLUTIONARY CHANGE as a means to make our community stronger.
His memoir DREAMS FROM MY FATHER does show his progressive community organizing history. It is in him. The choice is up to him. We can't force the man to do what is necessary, but we can inspire him and we should fairly evaluate his policies.
It is the plutocratic agenda harming the world. The President is the spokesman of that agenda. So, even he is not to be blamed for all of these things. It is just that there is the continuation of the nefarious policies from Reagan to the present. He or the President ought to be made accountable for his actions though. I have a great respect for the President's wife and his children. I will treat the President as a man for he is a man (he is not a devil nor an angel). He is a human being.
I was interviewed by a French journalist in Bmore a couple of months before the 2008 election. He asked me whether Obama's election, if it happened, would mark a new and postive turning poing for Blacks in America and the poor in general. I responded that while I had read up on Obama (including him memoirs) and knew about his relatively progressive PAST, I could not be certain what his CURRENT politics will be like if he is elected. I mentioned that many elected officials with progressive histories going back to the 60s when Obama was in diaperss (and I a small child), became greatly different kind of folk once in office. "It will be a matter of SYMBOLIC historical importance if he wins. I initially didn't expect him to get this far. But it is what happens AFTER he wins which will indicate whether there is SUBSTANTIAL historic importance." I also pointed out to the journalist my concern for the lack of a PROGRESSIVE MASS MOVEMENT on a large scale. "The system is the system" I told the journalist. And it is often forgotten that accomplishement acnieved under so-called progressive administrations flowed more from the presence of MOVEMENTS already on the ground before the new administration take office. There would probably have been no Civil Rights legislations under Kennedy or Johnson had there not be the Black Freedom Movement. White liberals didn't organized the Movement in Montgomery. The sit-ins and Freedom rides were already in progress when Kennedy was elected. Earlier the militant Labor Movement was in progress BEFORE FDR took office, and A. Phillip Randdolp had to threaten a mass march on DC to get FDR to act on segregation in the military.
Timothy

Norfolk, VA

#7708 Feb 25, 2014
Savant wrote:
<quoted text> I've read Obama's DREAMS FROM MY FATHER, and it only convinces me (especially in light of his performance since 2008) of the limitatons of politics in this racist capitalist republic. I wonder at times what Obama sees when he looks in the mirror these days, Yes, he was involved with anti-apartheid movement, with Black and Latin student organizing, reading Fanon and critiques of colonialism and neocolonialism, hanging with Marxist profs and supporting women's groups. But that eventually went by the wayside as he became an Establishment politician. But I'm not surprised. I know elder brother warriors whom I used to look up from the old Black Panther Party who are now politicians, and not a whit more progressive than other politicians (though, like Obama, they sometimes fall back on the old progressive rhetoric of Movement days that is still appealing to much of the Black masses). They, like Obama, were expected to be "transformational" leaders and proved to be (or eventually become) transactional politicos. Our people should have been warned when "leaders" after the 1960s began saying that we have to shift the Movement "from the STREETS to the SUITES." A red flag should have gone up immediately. We must fight CLASS and as well as RACE oppression. Yes, wold should opposed right wing racist attacks on Obama and others. But we must hold to the fire the feets of Obama and all other black bourgeois politicians, Our emphasis has to be on POPULAR and grassroots political activity and self-empowerment. And we cannot limit ourselves to electoral politics, but must begin to create new, revolutionary democratic institutions and associations.
Great Words Brother. We should focus on democratic, revolutionary associations instead of bourgeois political games. Many socialists forget to talk about race oppression. Electoral politics should never be used as some crutch for our liberation. We can be liberated with our strong, grassroots efforts. So, we need to oppose class and race oppression as you have eloquently mentioned.
Timothy

Norfolk, VA

#7709 Feb 25, 2014
I meant to write :

"... I do not have hatred of every liberal. I have a great deal of abhorrence of the reactionary agenda as you do..."

“Yes WE Can! Yes we Will!”

Level 8

Since: Jul 07

Baltimore, Md.

#7710 Feb 25, 2014
Abdurratln wrote:
<quoted text>
No, brother. Obama has no problem embracing "gay rights". But Africans voted for him to the tune of over 95%. What has he done for blacks? Nothing. That says to ever other future president" "Hey, you never have to listen to the black community no matter how much they vote for you." That is not good for us. No other president has done that damage to this community.
We have to face the facts that this liberal politics is not working for us. That means admitting that Obama has failed us. Then we can move forward and devise solutions. But we cannot afford to keep investing our blind support for someone who obviously hates the ground we walk on, namely he hates Africa.
I also mentioned to the French journalist that when King confronted Johnson regarding our right to vote, he got a bunch of foot shuffling and temporizing. "Oh yes, you're righht reverent. But we can't move to fast. We just got the civil acts act through, and maybe we ought to slow down for awhile and go for Voting rights a bit ladter." As I informed the journalist, Dr. King said "No dice! We're going to force your hand if we have to." And, of course, there was the Selma campaign which did lead to the Voting Rights Act. "What history teachers us" i said to the journalist, "is that while elections DO matter, ultimately it is the self=-activity of the MASSS which mattter more." I further explained that even if Obama hs the most progrressive sentiments it will mean little unless there's a MOVEMENT happening. Otherwise, the only voices Obama will hear will be those of donors and lobbyists---which is usually how American politics works for boht Democrats and Republicans. I argued that IF Obama still does have progressive sentiments, and we have a MOVEMENT happening, he will be able to appeal to the "will of the people" expressed in the streets. If he is NOT still motivated by progressive sentiments, a Movement may move him--kicking and screaming if necessary--in a more just direction. I told Bruno that "I wish I can assure you--since you seem to have progressive sentiments of your own---that Obama's victory in November will mark a great new era. But without popular insurgency it may turn out to be just another election--its symbolic significance notwithstanding." [That interview was actually published in France]
Timothy

Norfolk, VA

#7711 Feb 25, 2014
Savant wrote:
<quoted text>
I was interviewed by a French journalist in Bmore a couple of months before the 2008 election. He asked me whether Obama's election, if it happened, would mark a new and postive turning poing for Blacks in America and the poor in general. I responded that while I had read up on Obama (including him memoirs) and knew about his relatively progressive PAST, I could not be certain what his CURRENT politics will be like if he is elected. I mentioned that many elected officials with progressive histories going back to the 60s when Obama was in diaperss (and I a small child), became greatly different kind of folk once in office. "It will be a matter of SYMBOLIC historical importance if he wins. I initially didn't expect him to get this far. But it is what happens AFTER he wins which will indicate whether there is SUBSTANTIAL historic importance." I also pointed out to the journalist my concern for the lack of a PROGRESSIVE MASS MOVEMENT on a large scale. "The system is the system" I told the journalist. And it is often forgotten that accomplishement acnieved under so-called progressive administrations flowed more from the presence of MOVEMENTS already on the ground before the new administration take office. There would probably have been no Civil Rights legislations under Kennedy or Johnson had there not be the Black Freedom Movement. White liberals didn't organized the Movement in Montgomery. The sit-ins and Freedom rides were already in progress when Kennedy was elected. Earlier the militant Labor Movement was in progress BEFORE FDR took office, and A. Phillip Randdolp had to threaten a mass march on DC to get FDR to act on segregation in the military.
Interesting points.

Tavis Smiley made an interesting point about this. Many Presidents were at first were reluctant to pass PROGRESSIVE legislation. They were forced by mass movements (who advanced legitimate grievances) to create policies that were in favor of the interests of oppressed people. The abolitionist movement (headed by people like Sojouner Truth, Frederick Douglas, etc.) inspired America to abolish overt chattel slavery legally in America. It was certainly grassroots black movements not establishment white liberals who created the foundation of the black liberation struggle. The mass protests and movements among Brothers and Sisters ended American apartheid, but we are not totally free now. We are not free from oppression and discrimination. We are not free from economic exploitation and imperialism. So, we must continue to fight for the same goal of human liberation that past heroes have fought for. The transactional agenda of the current President has been disappointing. Yet, I am still inspired to fight. We all have the right to fight for the truth to end imperialism and to end any injustice in the world.

Level 8

Since: Aug 09

Saint Louis, MO

#7713 Feb 25, 2014
Timothy wrote:
I meant to say:
Malcolm X said the following: "...In order to do this, we're starting a voters registration drive, not as Democrats or Republicans, but registered as Independents..."
Malcolm was right back in the 1960s. But a lot has changer since then. We need an Independent Party African Political Party in order to build Black Power.

Level 8

Since: Aug 09

Saint Louis, MO

#7714 Feb 25, 2014
Savant wrote:
<quoted text> I am essentially in agreement with what you're proposing here. i especially want to emphasize the creation of cooperatives simply because they're economic forms which REQUIRE democratic participation and governance in ways not require, or not even possible, with capitalistic enterprises.
As I said above, we must move beyond mere independent registration to independent political party, we must also move beyond mere cooperatves tio specific kinds of cooperatives. After decades of studying African econo0mics, we now know that the best cooperative at this time is the Pan-Africanist Credit Union. Let's make the Credit Union the foundation and build all other coops upon that base.

For example, in the early phases of the Convention People's Party Pan-Africanist Credit Union Project, we learned that we need at least a couple thousands of members to make the project viable. I began canvassing from door to door. Political parties always canvass from door to door. But the liberal Dummycarts who control black neighborhoods twisted the law to say the CPP cannot canvass. Of course that is unconstitutional. But it would take decades for us to take that to the Supreme Court.

So, I realized that to get the membership we needed to own a property, a headquarters where people could come to us. Therefore, I proposed an Afro-dollar store because every neighborhood needs a dollar store. A percentage of every dollar spent in the dollar store will be held back in reserves as credit union dues. This is not abstract theory. This is what happens when a person gets off his butt and try to implement theory in practice.

Savant wrote:
<quoted text>The only problem is that there must also be changes in the larger society--fundamental changes. Hence our politics--and by politics I don't mean just electoral politics--must also master the art of useful alliances.
No. We cannot do any alliances at all until we get our own house in order. That means basing our power in Africa. It means linking with the Pan-Africanist Congress and ZANU-PF and the Convention People's Party. AFTER we do all of that, we might look at some other relationships. But not before.

Savant wrote:
<quoted text> The liberal coalitions under liberal Democrat administrations (which hardly exist any longer) might have been useful during the EARLY phase of the Civil Rights Movement, but not much after. And it is now LONG after. I am interested in both internal Black political and intellectual efforts which have a revolutionary character. And at least a revolutionary potential must be there in the multiracial alliances which we may opt for in the future. I am convionced that Dr. King was right that we need a "radical revolution of values" and a "radical redistributiion of political economic power."
We simply have to strengthen our ties to the Pan-Africanist parties in Africa. In order to do that, we have to move far from black racism.(For example, the New Black Panthers were recently in Africa. They got laughed out of town with their stupid "the white man is the devil" rhetoric.) That means making deals with the Muslim parties in such places as Sudan, etc. That means doing business with Arabs and Berbers. But in dealing with ZANU-PF, it means doing business with the Chinese and Malaysians and Singaporeans, etc. Above all it means Christians and Muslims must find common ground as Nkrumah said. Basically, we will rebuild the Afro-Asian economic ties that existed before the white man got into the mix.

Level 8

Since: Aug 09

Saint Louis, MO

#7715 Feb 25, 2014
Savant wrote:
<quoted text>
I also mentioned to the French journalist that when King confronted Johnson regarding our right to vote, he got a bunch of foot shuffling and temporizing. "Oh yes, you're righht reverent. But we can't move to fast. We just got the civil acts act through, and maybe we ought to slow down for awhile and go for Voting rights a bit ladter." As I informed the journalist, Dr. King said "No dice! We're going to force your hand if we have to." And, of course, there was the Selma campaign which did lead to the Voting Rights Act. "What history teachers us" i said to the journalist, "is that while elections DO matter, ultimately it is the self=-activity of the MASSS which mattter more." I further explained that even if Obama hs the most progrressive sentiments it will mean little unless there's a MOVEMENT happening. Otherwise, the only voices Obama will hear will be those of donors and lobbyists---which is usually how American politics works for boht Democrats and Republicans. I argued that IF Obama still does have progressive sentiments, and we have a MOVEMENT happening, he will be able to appeal to the "will of the people" expressed in the streets. If he is NOT still motivated by progressive sentiments, a Movement may move him--kicking and screaming if necessary--in a more just direction. I told Bruno that "I wish I can assure you--since you seem to have progressive sentiments of your own---that Obama's victory in November will mark a great new era. But without popular insurgency it may turn out to be just another election--its symbolic significance notwithstanding." [That interview was actually published in France]
Let me remind you of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and Mother Fannie Lou Hammer. Johnson refused them. Johnson (like KKKLinton Obama and every other liberal) was a no good SOB tot he core.

Level 8

Since: Aug 09

Saint Louis, MO

#7716 Feb 25, 2014
Timothy wrote:
<quoted text>
Interesting points.
Tavis Smiley made an interesting point about this. Many Presidents were at first were reluctant to pass PROGRESSIVE legislation. They were forced by mass movements (who advanced legitimate grievances) to create policies that were in favor of the interests of oppressed people. The abolitionist movement (headed by people like Sojouner Truth, Frederick Douglas, etc.) inspired America to abolish overt chattel slavery legally in America. It was certainly grassroots black movements not establishment white liberals who created the foundation of the black liberation struggle. The mass protests and movements among Brothers and Sisters ended American apartheid, but we are not totally free now. We are not free from oppression and discrimination. We are not free from economic exploitation and imperialism. So, we must continue to fight for the same goal of human liberation that past heroes have fought for. The transactional agenda of the current President has been disappointing. Yet, I am still inspired to fight. We all have the right to fight for the truth to end imperialism and to end any injustice in the world.
Apartheid is the right word. But in ending Apartheid Zimbabwe must be our model, not ANC under Zuma. What ZANU-PF did in Zimbabwe was place the economy in the hands of the Zimbabwe people. But in South Africa, the white minority still controls everything. Let us learn from Zimbabwe and support Zimbabwe.

Like ZANU-PF in Zimbabwe, we have to put the people in our community in control of the economy of our community. That means Pan-Africanist Credit Unions. And when we get money to invest, our first priority is to find ways to invest our money in Zimbabwe where we know it will be used properly.

Also, we need to take a serious look at Islamic Economics. Our Credit Unions must avoid charging our people excessive interests and usury to earn huge profits. It is best to not make big profits if it means our customers will be stronger financially and therefore able to bring more business to us. Profit is not always the best thing in doing business.

Level 8

Since: Aug 09

Saint Louis, MO

#7718 Feb 25, 2014
FlowFighter wrote:
<quoted text>
"That means doing business with Arabs and Berbers. But in dealing with ZANU-PF, it means doing business with the Chinese and Malaysians and Singaporeans, etc. Above all it means Christians and Muslims must find common ground as Nkrumah said. Basically, we will rebuild the Afro-Asian economic ties that existed before the white man got into the mix. "
Your unbounded hunger and lust to suck the nu*ts of those who despise you.....
pathetic
All of the people you mention have one crucial thing that AAs do not:
LAND.....
We have Africa if you are not too stupid to claim it and own it.
FlowFighter wrote:
<quoted text>"Second, income distribution is only one measure of economic inequality. The Great Recession had a devastating impact on the wealth of Black households, largely explained by the impact of the housing crisis (see Jeannette Wicks-Lim,“The Great Recession in Black Wealth,” D&S, Jan/Feb 2012). In 2004, the net worth of White households was about eleven times that of Black households (bad enough), about the same as it had been since the early 1980s (with a slight improvement in the mid-1990s). But by 2009, though both Black and White net worth fell from 2004, White net worth was 19 times Black net worth."
http://www.truth-out.org/opinion/item/18473-b...
AAs are broke and landless....
Kissing the n**uts of people who are neither isn't going anywhere
B!tch, the world is a village. If we are going get alone in this world we have to do business with our neighbors.

Level 8

Since: Aug 09

Saint Louis, MO

#7719 Feb 25, 2014
Africans cannot isolate ourselves from our friends in Asia, Latin America and Arabia. For example, we made a huge mistake in Zimbabwe by trying to make peace with the white man in UK and USA. Once they had us under their control, they refused to honor their part of the deal and pay the white farmers for the land they stole from us and which we told them we would take back whether they paid for it or not. When we took the land, they tried to starve us into submission. They might have succeeded if the Chinese had not invested at least $10 billion when we needed it most. Obama only pledged $73 million.( http://voices.washingtonpost.com/44/2009/06/1... ) And he still has not lifted the sanctions. The Chinese invested 100 times more money than the USA did. And that is what kept millions of Zimbabweans from starving to death the way the Somalis starved to death.( http://panafricannews.blogspot.com/2013/07/so... ) Understand this. If we isolate ourselves from Asia, the white man and his Uncle Tom flunkies like Obama would murder us one by one.

Level 8

Since: Aug 09

Saint Louis, MO

#7720 Feb 25, 2014
Another point. Before the whites colonized Africa and Asia, we had business and trade ties between us. Now, we will restore those ties simply because we are now free and can make smart business decisions. Think. We will invite China, India, Arabia, Indonesia, Vietnam, Japan Brazil, etc to come to Africa and invest in Africa. That will force the white man to compete and pay a higher price for all the minerals and resources he is currently stealing and robbing and pillaging from Africa without paying a fair price.

Level 8

Since: Aug 09

Saint Louis, MO

#7721 Feb 25, 2014
I get sick and tired of idiots who want to play the stupid race card against the Arabs. Arabs live in Africa. And we have no choice but to get along with them as long as they act right. Furthermore, we are going to invite the Chinese to send some of their surplus population to Africa as long as they help us to develop Africa and invest in Africa.

“THE TRUTH MUST BE TOLD! ”

Since: Apr 08

Location hidden

#7722 Mar 2, 2014
Every single chapter of slave trade of Kidnapped Humans from the African Continent, is Equally Responsible for the Degradation of Her (AFRICA'S) PEOPLES!!!

You can't give any of the BASTARDS a pass. The same LEACHES who SUCKED THE LIFE OUT OF AFRICA IN THE PAST, ARE STILL DOING IT IN THE PRESENT. ALTHOUGH THEY ARE BEING POLITICALLY SLICK, BY SAYING THEIR DOING EVERYTHING IN THE NAME OF DEMOCRACY!!! WHICH IS JUST ANOTHER WAY OF SAYING: "WE'RE GOING TO LET YOU CHOOSE THE FAKE GOVERNMENT THAT WILL BE CONTROLLED FROM BEHIND THE CLOAK!!! THAT WSY THE FOREGIN MULTI MILLIONARES AND BILLIONARE RACIST WHO ARE PULLING THE STRINGS, CAN REMAIN INCOGNITO!!!

“Yes WE Can! Yes we Will!”

Level 8

Since: Jul 07

Baltimore, Md.

#7723 Mar 2, 2014
Abdurratln wrote:
I get sick and tired of idiots who want to play the stupid race card against the Arabs. Arabs live in Africa. And we have no choice but to get along with them as long as they act right. Furthermore, we are going to invite the Chinese to send some of their surplus population to Africa as long as they help us to develop Africa and invest in Africa.
Bu "as long as they act right" is a very important qualification. Arabs in African haven't always acted right, Anti-colonial movements have long held that even Europeans are welcomed to stay "if they act right", but not if they cling to being masters and exploiters in someone's else's home.

Insect Trust
Level 1

Since: Aug 13

Location hidden

#7724 Apr 26, 2014
Savant wrote:
<quoted text> I am essentially in agreement with what you're proposing here. i especially want to emphasize the creation of cooperatives simply because they're economic forms which REQUIRE democratic participation and governance in ways not require, or not even possible, with capitalistic enterprises. Some of the programs offered by SNCC and the Black Panther Party can (with some modification in light of contemporary realities) be still relevant and useful. And they can help[ us lessen whyite capitalist economic power over our communities. The only problem is that there must also be changes in the larger society--fundamental changes. Hence our politics--and by politics I don't mean just electoral politics--must also master the art of useful alliances. While I do not share the same degree of animosity toward liberals as does Abdurratin (since the Right is obviously FAR worst), I wold not rely on them when it comes to FUNDAMENTAL social transformation either. And Dr. King himself argued in WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE, CHAOS OR COMMUNITY that the old liberal coalitions were not likely to work any longer. You may recall that he argues that as our movememnt was transitioning from the fight for constitutional rights to the fight for HUMAN RIGHTS (as Malcolm had argued), a new more revolutionary thrust would have to characterize not only the internal politics of the Black struggle, but also the kind of alliances would would have to make in the future. The liberal coalitions under liberal Democrat administrations (which hardly exist any longer) might have been useful during the EARLY phase of the Civil Rights Movement, but not much after. And it is now LONG after. I am interested in both internal Black political and intellectual efforts which have a revolutionary character. And at least a revolutionary potential must be there in the multiracial alliances which we may opt for in the future. I am convionced that Dr. King was right that we need a "radical revolution of values" and a "radical redistributiion of political economic power."
This sort of local economy autonomy is required for all people. It's not that all whites have it, while blacks need it... the 1% has freedom, and the rest of us are serfs.

Naturally I support any such development in any community, and as for AA, given their historical circumstance, it is all the more imperative that some sort of “autonomy” in the manner of that promised (though not de facto granted) to indigenous groups in all those broken treaties. But to speak of any sort of sovereignty or autonomy for black people in the U$A scares the rulers for sure.

I want to see them confronted with a coalition of black, white, latino, Native, etc., whomever, all demanding an end to corporate hegemony over our lives.

My inability to refute in any way the philosophy of Dr. King means that I must support this for all people.

Bon soir! Tu sais qui suis-je, n'est-ce pas?

“CO2 is Gaseous Love”

Level 10

Since: Dec 08

Home, sweet home.

#7725 Apr 26, 2014
Reverend King Stood up for our gun rights; those occupy stoners couldn't even load a handgun.

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