Yaaaay its black history babyyyy

Yaaaay its black history babyyyy

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aZiya

Since: Feb 11

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#1 Jan 31, 2012
Although blk history is all year for me, we all kno february is black history month

So lets post some blks history moments,

a--x--e

“Putrifying Trayvon...”

Level 5

Since: Dec 11

Grateful Nation

#2 Jan 31, 2012

aZiya

Since: Feb 11

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#3 Jan 31, 2012
One of my favs,

1968 olympics blk power salute
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/1968_Olympics_...
Tommie smith and john carlos

a--x--e

“Putrifying Trayvon...”

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Since: Dec 11

Grateful Nation

#4 Jan 31, 2012

aZiya

Since: Feb 11

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#5 Jan 31, 2012
“ye Method of Inoculation”
as the best means of curing smallpox
and noted that he had learned of this
process from “my Negro-Man
Onesimus, who is a pretty Intelligent
Fellow”(Winslow, 33). Onesimus
explained that he had
undergone an Operation, which
had given him something of ye
Small-Pox, and would forever
preserve him from it, adding,
That it was often used among
[Africans] and whoever had ye
Courage to use it, was forever
free from ye Fear of the
Contagion. He described ye
Operation to me, and showed
me in his Arm ye Scar.”(Winslow,
33)

aZiya

Since: Feb 11

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#6 Jan 31, 2012
Onesimus; slave and medical pioneer

“What Doesn't Kill You”

Level 4

Since: Jan 12

Makes You Stronger

#7 Jan 31, 2012
http://www.youtube.com/watch... #!

Happy Black History Month my people!

aZiya

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#8 Jan 31, 2012
The Tribune wrote:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?f eature=player_embedded&v=F us4nBIjV2I#!
Happy Black History Month my people!
HBHM

a--x--e

“Putrifying Trayvon...”

Level 5

Since: Dec 11

Grateful Nation

#9 Jan 31, 2012
The Tribune wrote:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?f eature=player_embedded&v=F us4nBIjV2I#!
Happy Black History Month my people!

aZiya

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#10 Jan 31, 2012
William Jackson, a slave, listened
closely to Jefferson Davis'
conversations and leaked them to the
North.
Slave in Jefferson Davis' home gave
Union key secrets
articles.cnn.com/2009-02-20/us/spy.slaves_1_s...

“What Doesn't Kill You”

Level 4

Since: Jan 12

Makes You Stronger

#11 Jan 31, 2012
Harriet Tubman (born Araminta Harriet Ross; 1820 – March 10, 1913) was an African-American abolitionist, humanitarian, and Union spy during the American Civil War. After escaping from slavery, into which she was born, she made thirteen missions to rescue more than 70 slaves[1] using the network of antislavery activists and safe houses known as the Underground Railroad. She later helped John Brown recruit men for his raid on Harpers Ferry, and in the post-war era struggled for women's suffrage.

As a child in Dorchester County, Maryland, Tubman was beaten by masters to whom she was hired out. Early in her life, she suffered a head wound when hit by a heavy metal weight. The injury caused disabling seizures, narcoleptic attacks, headaches, and powerful visionary and dream activity, which occurred throughout her life. A devout Christian, Tubman ascribed the visions and vivid dreams to revelations from God.

In 1849, Tubman escaped to Philadelphia, then immediately returned to Maryland to rescue her family. Slowly, one group at a time, she brought relatives out of the state, and eventually guided dozens of other slaves to freedom. Traveling by night, Tubman (or "Moses", as she was called) "never lost a passenger".[2] Large rewards were offered for the return of many of the fugitive slaves, but no one then knew that Tubman was the one helping them. When the Southern-dominated Congress passed the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850, requiring law officials in free states to aid efforts to recapture slaves, she helped guide fugitives farther north into Canada, where slavery was prohibited.

When the American Civil War began, Tubman worked for the Union Army, first as a cook and nurse, and then as an armed scout and spy. The first woman to lead an armed expedition in the war, she guided the Combahee River Raid, which liberated more than 700 slaves in South Carolina. After the war, she retired to the family home in Auburn, New York, where she cared for her aging parents. She became active in the women's suffrage movement in New York until illness overtook her. Near the end of her life, she lived in a home for elderly African-Americans that she had helped found years earlier.

“What Doesn't Kill You”

Level 4

Since: Jan 12

Makes You Stronger

#12 Jan 31, 2012

“What Doesn't Kill You”

Level 4

Since: Jan 12

Makes You Stronger

#13 Jan 31, 2012

“What Doesn't Kill You”

Level 4

Since: Jan 12

Makes You Stronger

#14 Jan 31, 2012

“What Doesn't Kill You”

Level 4

Since: Jan 12

Makes You Stronger

#15 Jan 31, 2012
Rosa Louise McCauley Parks (February 4, 1913 – October 24, 2005) was an African-American civil rights activist, whom the U.S. Congress called "the first lady of civil rights", and "the mother of the freedom movement".

On December 1, 1955 in Montgomery, Alabama, Parks refused to obey bus driver James F. Blake's order that she give up her seat to make room for a white passenger. Parks' action was not the first of its kind to impact the civil rights issue. Others had taken similar steps, including Lizzie Jennings in 1854, Homer Plessy in 1892, Irene Morgan in 1946, Sarah Louise Keys in 1955, and Claudette Colvin on the same bus system nine months before Parks, but Parks' civil disobedience had the effect of sparking the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Parks' act of defiance became an important symbol of the modern Civil Rights Movement and Parks became an international icon of resistance to racial segregation. She organized and collaborated with civil rights leaders, including boycott leader Martin Luther King, Jr., helping to launch him to national prominence in the civil rights movement.

At the time of her action, Parks was secretary of the Montgomery chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and had recently attended the Highlander Folk School, a Tennessee center for workers' rights and racial equality. Nonetheless, she took her action as a private citizen "tired of giving in". Although widely honored in later years for her action, she suffered for it, losing her job as a seamstress in a local department store. Eventually, she moved to Detroit, Michigan, where she found similar work. From 1965 to 1988 she served as secretary and receptionist to African-American U.S. Representative John Conyers. After retirement from this position, she wrote an autobiography and lived a largely private life in Detroit. In her final years she suffered from dementia, and became involved in a lawsuit filed on her behalf against American hip-hop duo OutKast.

Parks eventually received many honors ranging from the 1979 Spingarn Medal to the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Congressional Gold Medal and a posthumous statue in the United States Capitol's National Statuary Hall. Upon her death in 2005, she was the first woman and second non-U.S. government official granted the posthumous honor of lying in honor at the Capitol Rotunda.

aZiya

Since: Feb 11

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#16 Jan 31, 2012
as recently as 1880 AD in
Europe, the mortality rate was
almost 100% for mothers delivering
their babies by caesarian section
(that is, delivering babies through
the abdomen). Consequently, the
operation was only performed to
save the life of the infant. Dr. R. W.
Felkin, a missionary, shocked the
European medical community when
he published in the Edinburgh
Medical Journal in 1884 that the
Banyoro surgeons in Uganda
performed caesarian sections
routinely, without harmful effects to
the mother or the infant. A group of
European surgeons went to study in
Uganda for six months before they
could successfully learn the
advanced surgical techniques
demonstrated by the Africans. The
Europeans were also taught
sophisticated concepts of anesthesia
and antisepsis. For example, they
were taught to routinely wash the
surgeon's hands and the mother's
abdomen with alcohol prior to
surgery to prevent infection.

aZiya

Since: Feb 11

Location hidden

#17 Jan 31, 2012
Although Africans and people of
African descent are seldom given
credit in standard textbooks,
African wisdom contributed greatly
toward the development of modern
medicine. For example, in Western
Africa during the Songhay Empire,
about 1457 AD,(when Europe was
still in its "Dark Ages") the city of
Jeanne had a medical school which
employed 100's of teachers and was
world famous for training surgeons
in difficult operations such as
cataract surgery. They also taught
the pharmacological use of over
1,000 animal and plant products for
the treatment of medical illnesses.
Many of these same medicines in pill
or liquid form are used today. For
example, castor seeds, the source of
castor oil, was used for constipation
and castor oil is still used today.
Kaolin was used for diarrhea and is
still used today in kaopectate. Night
blindness caused by Vitamin "A"
deficiency was treated with Ox
liver, which is rich in vitamin "A" .
Vitamin "C" deficiency was treated
with onions, which have a high
vitamin "C" content.

“Dont Play With Me”

Level 4

Since: Jun 11

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#18 Jan 31, 2012
Ill probably be posting some stuff later but great thread.:) Happy Black History Month guys!:)

aZiya

Since: Feb 11

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#19 Jan 31, 2012
More than 40% of modern
pharmacological medicines are
derived from traditional African
medicinal herbs. For example, the
Yoruba of Nigeria used the plant
Rauwolfia vomitoria as a sedative or
tranquilizer to calm agitated or
psychotic patients. Modern medicine
was able to isolate a substance
called reserpine from this plant that
was marketed for the same
purpose. Reserpine was also
discovered to profoundly lower
blood pressure and consequently,
became one of the antihypertensive
medications.

“What Doesn't Kill You”

Level 4

Since: Jan 12

Makes You Stronger

#20 Jan 31, 2012

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