Activist: "Abortion Threatens Black America's Future"

Sep 24, 2012 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: Booker Rising

The From Catholic Online : "Adding to the argument that abortion threatens one sector of American society over others, Catherine Davis, president of The Restoration Project, pointed out to the great racial disparity of women currently getting abortions." The article continues: "Davis said that according to the Centers for Disease Control, ... (more)

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zef

Hemet, CA

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#1748
Sep 19, 2013
 

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cpeter1313 wrote:
Feel free to show the legislation that grant fetuses rights. We have animal cruelty laws, but they don't grant animals rights.
<quoted text>
Human rights are inherent. Human rights are never granted or legislated to anyone of any age.

“Reality is better than truth.”

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Indianapolis

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#1749
Sep 19, 2013
 
Peachy. Are are these rights codified somewhere, or can we say anything is a human right?
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
Human rights are inherent. Human rights are never granted or legislated to anyone of any age.
zef

Hemet, CA

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#1750
Sep 19, 2013
 
cpeter1313 wrote:
Peachy. Are are these rights codified somewhere, or can we say anything is a human right?
<quoted text>
You can say anything you want, whether or not what you say makes sense is all that really matters.
Human rights are commonly assumed to refer, in some vague sense, to "fundamental" needs. In fact, some theorists go so far as to limit human rights to a single core right or two--for example, the right to life or the right to equal freedom of opportunity. The tendency is to emphasize "basic needs" and to rule out "mere wants".
For example, just because a woman wants an abortion does not give her the right to have an abortion.
The collective intelligence of society can and does determine that abortion is a mere want and not right. Furthermore the collective intelligence of society can and does determine that abortion is a crime against humanity.

“Reality is better than truth.”

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#1751
Sep 20, 2013
 

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We have a constitution precisely because of blather like this. "THEORISTS" do not determine rights in this country; our ruling document does. Whether you want a woman to have an abortion or not is not your right; it's hers.

The "collective intelligence of society" is exactly what the founders feared--it's just a euphemism for mob rule.
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
You can say anything you want, whether or not what you say makes sense is all that really matters.e "
Human rights are commonly assumed to refer, in some vague sense, to "fundamental" needs. In fact, some theorists go so far as to limit human rights to a single core right or two--for example, the right to life or the right to equal freedom of opportunity. The tendency is to emphasize "basic needs" and to rule out "mere wants".
For example, just because a woman wants an abortion does not give her the right to have an abortion.
The can and does determine that abortion is a mere want and not right. Furthermore the collective intelligence of society can and does determine that abortion is a crime against humanity.
zef

Hemet, CA

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#1752
Sep 23, 2013
 

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cpeter1313 wrote:
We have a constitution precisely because of blather like this. "THEORISTS" do not determine rights in this country; our ruling document does. Whether you want a woman to have an abortion or not is not your right; it's hers.
The "collective intelligence of society" is exactly what the founders feared--it's just a euphemism for mob rule.
<quoted text>
Human rights are not determined by countries, or documents. We are naturally endowed by our creator with our human rights. The collective intelligence of humanity determines what those rights are, not society. I never said anything about what I want, or don't want. I said abortion is not a right, because abortion is a mere want, and not a need.
cpeter1313 wrote:
The vast majority of abortions take place before gender testing is available. Moreover, most women abort because they don't want to be pregnant, not because of the gender of the fetus.
<quoted text>

“Reality is better than truth.”

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#1753
Sep 23, 2013
 

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It's so cute when you babble. Take your version of "human rights into a courtroom and see how well it works.
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
Human rights are not determined by countries, or documents. We are naturally endowed by our creator with our human rights. The collective intelligence of humanity determines what those rights are, not society. I never said anything about what I want, or don't want. I said abortion is not a right, because abortion is a mere want, and not a need.
<quoted text>
zef

Hemet, CA

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#1754
Sep 23, 2013
 

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cpeter1313 wrote:
It's so cute when you babble. Take your version of "human rights into a courtroom and see how well it works.
<quoted text>
My version? My babble?
IN CONGRESS, July 4, 1776.
The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America,

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.
zef

Hemet, CA

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#1755
Sep 23, 2013
 
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
Parish had a lame leg, a genuine lame leg which gave him a good deal of pain: that had to be remembered, as well as his sour expression and whining voice.
"I am worried, very worried. I wish I was not lame," said Parish.
So Niggle went. You see, it was awkward. Parish was his neighbour, and everyone else a long way off.

“Reality is better than truth.”

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#1756
Sep 24, 2013
 
And, again, for the slow among us: The DOI is not a ruling document and holds no authority in the courts.
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
My version? My babble?
IN CONGRESS, July 4, 1776.
The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America,
We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.
zef

Hemet, CA

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#1757
Sep 24, 2013
 

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cpeter1313 wrote:
And, again, for the slow among us: The DOI is not a ruling document and holds no authority in the courts.
<quoted text>
News flash. We are independent from great britian because of the authority of the declaration of independence, which means the declaration of independence gives every court in America their authority. Because the declaration of independence is the supreme ruling document of America. Besides which, we are discussing human rights, which have authority over courts.

Nations come into being in many ways. Military rebellion, civil strife, acts of heroism, acts of treachery, a thousand greater and lesser clashes between defenders of the old order and supporters of the new--all these occurrences and more have marked the emergences of new nations, large and small. The birth of our own nation included them all. That birth was unique, not only in the immensity of its later impact on the course of world history and the growth of democracy, but also because so many of the threads in our national history run back through time to come together in one place, in one time, and in one document: the Declaration of Independence.
Drafted by Thomas Jefferson between June 11 and June 28, 1776, the Declaration of Independence is at once the nation's most cherished symbol of liberty and Jefferson's most enduring monument. Here, in exalted and unforgettable phrases, Jefferson expressed the convictions in the minds and hearts of the American people. The political philosophy of the Declaration was not new; its ideals of individual liberty had already been expressed by John Locke and the Continental philosophers. What Jefferson did was to summarize this philosophy in "self-evident truths" and set forth a list of grievances against the King in order to justify before the world the breaking of ties between the colonies and the mother country. The nation to which the Declaration gave birth has had an immense impact on human history, and continues to do so. In telling the story of the parchment, it is appropriate to recall the words of poet and Librarian of Congress Archibald MacLeish. He described the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution as "these fragile objects which bear so great a weight of meaning to our people." The story of the Declaration of Independence as a document can only be a part of the larger history, a history still unfolding, a "weight of meaning" constantly, challenged, strengthened, and redefined.

“Reality is better than truth.”

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#1758
Sep 24, 2013
 

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Being homeschooled by squirrels did not serve you well.

We are independent of GB because we fought a war against them--twice. The DOI held NO authority. The constitution governs our legal and political structure--including the courts. "Human rights" aren't a recognized legal term and mean nothing in a court of law. Nor does anyone else have to follow your guidelines.

It's instructive that abortion was legal in every state after the constitution was adopted.
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
News flash. We are independent from great britian because of the authority of the declaration of independence, which means the declaration of independence gives every court in America their authority. Because the declaration of independence is the supreme ruling document of America. Besides which, we are discussing human rights, which have authority over courts.
Nations come into being in many ways. Military rebellion, civil strife, acts of heroism, acts of treachery, a thousand greater and lesser clashes between defenders of the old order and supporters of the new--all these occurrences and more have marked the emergences of new nations, large and small. The birth of our own nation included them all. That birth was unique, not only in the immensity of its later impact on the course of world history and the growth of democracy, but also because so many of the threads in our national history run back through time to come together in one place, in one time, and in one document: the Declaration of Independence.
Drafted by Thomas Jefferson between June 11 and June 28, 1776, the Declaration of Independence is at once the nation's most cherished symbol of liberty and Jefferson's most enduring monument. Here, in exalted and unforgettable phrases, Jefferson expressed the convictions in the minds and hearts of the American people. The political philosophy of the Declaration was not new; its ideals of individual liberty had already been expressed by John Locke and the Continental philosophers. What Jefferson did was to summarize this philosophy in "self-evident truths" and set forth a list of grievances against the King in order to justify before the world the breaking of ties between the colonies and the mother country. The nation to which the Declaration gave birth has had an immense impact on human history, and continues to do so. In telling the story of the parchment, it is appropriate to recall the words of poet and Librarian of Congress Archibald MacLeish. He described the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution as "these fragile objects which bear so great a weight of meaning to our people." The story of the Declaration of Independence as a document can only be a part of the larger history, a history still unfolding, a "weight of meaning" constantly, challenged, strengthened, and redefined.
zef

Hemet, CA

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#1759
Sep 24, 2013
 

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cpeter1313 wrote:
Being homeschooled by squirrels did not serve you well.
We are independent of GB because we fought a war against them--twice. The DOI held NO authority. The constitution governs our legal and political structure--including the courts. "Human rights" aren't a recognized legal term and mean nothing in a court of law. Nor does anyone else have to follow your guidelines.
It's instructive that abortion was legal in every state after the constitution was adopted.
<quoted text>
The NARA is squirrels?
Nations come into being in many ways. Military rebellion, civil strife, acts of heroism, acts of treachery, a thousand greater and lesser clashes between defenders of the old order and supporters of the new--all these occurrences and more have marked the emergences of new nations, large and small. The birth of our own nation included them all. That birth was unique, not only in the immensity of its later impact on the course of world history and the growth of democracy, but also because so many of the threads in our national history run back through time to come together in one place, in one time, and in one document: the Declaration of Independence.

Securing our human rights is the purpose of our government and its laws. The Declaration of Independence established the core principles of our Nation, the United States of America. Our Constitution with the Amendments provide a rule of law for an actual government to accomplish those principles.
"That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed,"

http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/dec...

By 1948, the United Nations’ new Human Rights Commission had captured the attention of the world. Under the dynamic chairmanship of Eleanor Roosevelt—President Franklin Roosevelt’s widow, a human rights champion in her own right and the United States delegate to the UN—the Commission set out to draft the document that became the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Roosevelt, credited with its inspiration, referred to the Declaration as the “international Magna Carta for all mankind.” It was adopted by the United Nations on December 10, 1948.
In its preamble and in Article 1, the Declaration unequivocally proclaims the inherent rights of all human beings:“Disregard and contempt for human rights have resulted in barbarous acts which have outraged the conscience of mankind, and the advent of a world in which human beings shall enjoy freedom of speech and belief and freedom from fear and want has been proclaimed as the highest aspiration of the common people....All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.”
The Member States of the United Nations pledged to work together to promote the thirty Articles of human rights that, for the first time in history, had been assembled and codified into a single document. In consequence, many of these rights, in various forms, are today part of the constitutional laws of democratic nations.

“I Luv Carbon Dioxide”

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#1760
Sep 24, 2013
 

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Abortion by third party payment is death culture.
treppinh

Pittsburgh, PA

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#1761
Sep 24, 2013
 
youtube.com/watch... …… Breathing contradicts smoking also

“Reality is better than truth.”

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#1762
Sep 24, 2013
 

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Neither the DOI or the constitution grants government the right to deny a woman her medical choices, and neither grant fetuses rights--in any respect.

The international human rights document doesn't grant fetuses rights nor does it forbid abortion; if anything, it has supported the rights of women to abort.
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
The NARA is squirrels?
Nations come into being in many ways. Military rebellion, civil strife, acts of heroism, acts of treachery, a thousand greater and lesser clashes between defenders of the old order and supporters of the new--all these occurrences and more have marked the emergences of new nations, large and small. The birth of our own nation included them all. That birth was unique, not only in the immensity of its later impact on the course of world history and the growth of democracy, but also because so many of the threads in our national history run back through time to come together in one place, in one time, and in one document: the Declaration of Independence.
Securing our human rights is the purpose of our government and its laws. The Declaration of Independence established the core principles of our Nation, the United States of America. Our Constitution with the Amendments provide a rule of law for an actual government to accomplish those principles.
"That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed,"
http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/dec...
By 1948, the United Nations’ new Human Rights Commission had captured the attention of the world. Under the dynamic chairmanship of Eleanor Roosevelt—President Franklin Roosevelt’s widow, a human rights champion in her own right and the United States delegate to the UN—the Commission set out to draft the document that became the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Roosevelt, credited with its inspiration, referred to the Declaration as the “international Magna Carta for all mankind.” It was adopted by the United Nations on December 10, 1948.
In its preamble and in Article 1, the Declaration unequivocally proclaims the inherent rights of all human beings:“Disregard and contempt for human rights have resulted in barbarous acts which have outraged the conscience of mankind, and the advent of a world in which human beings shall enjoy freedom of speech and belief and freedom from fear and want has been proclaimed as the highest aspiration of the common people....All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.”
The Member States of the United Nations pledged to work together to promote the thirty Articles of human rights that, for the first time in history, had been assembled and codified into a single document. In consequence, many of these rights, in various forms, are today part of the constitutional laws of democratic nations.

“Reality is better than truth.”

Level 1

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Indianapolis

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#1763
Sep 24, 2013
 
I used to like playing MadLibs, too.
Brian_G wrote:
Abortion by third party payment is death culture.
zef

Hemet, CA

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#1764
Sep 24, 2013
 
cpeter1313 wrote:
Neither the DOI or the constitution grants government the right to deny a woman her medical choices, and neither grant fetuses rights--in any respect.
The international human rights document doesn't grant fetuses rights nor does it forbid abortion; if anything, it has supported the rights of women to abort.
<quoted text>
Human rights cannot be granted. Human rights are inherent. Fetus have the same rights as any other human of any other age.
Abortion is not a right. Abortion is a crime against humanity.
Governments do not have rights, humans have rights, and the purpose of our government is to protect our human rights.

“Obsidian Princess”

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louisiana

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#1765
Sep 24, 2013
 

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zef wrote:
<quoted text>
Human rights cannot be granted. Human rights are inherent. Fetus have the same rights as any other human of any other age.
Abortion is not a right. Abortion is a crime against humanity.
Governments do not have rights, humans have rights, and the purpose of our government is to protect our human rights.
when a fetus is giving equal rights to a woman, women are in TROUBLE. in every respect. the born comes before the unborn; that's common sense!!!

women will not allow the law to enslave us to our wombs. we don't loose ANY OF OUR RIGHTS just because we are pregnant.

“Obsidian Princess”

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louisiana

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#1766
Sep 24, 2013
 
"given"
zef

Hemet, CA

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#1767
Sep 24, 2013
 
dragonpat wrote:
<quoted text>
when a fetus is giving equal rights to a woman, women are in TROUBLE. in every respect. the born comes before the unborn; that's common sense!!!
women will not allow the law to enslave us to our wombs. we don't loose ANY OF OUR RIGHTS just because we are pregnant.
Rights aren't given to anyone. Human rights are equally inherent to all humans. The most basic human right being the right to life. Your crass ageist hatemongering and persecution of young people is vulgar and offensive. As much as you like to think so, being a woman does not make you superior to anyone, nor does being a woman give you the right to kill anyone, no matter how young your victims are. Your lunatic obsession with the importance of birth is extremely disturbing.

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