HUMANS: Ignore the Harrisburg nighur.

HUMANS: Ignore the Harrisburg nighur.

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Heap Big Chief

Springfield, NE

#1 Sep 2, 2013
Trust me.

Don't reply, just let it ook and eek all it wants.
BS Detector

Harrisburg, PA

#2 Sep 2, 2013
Heap Big Chief

Omaha, NE

This Omaha NE guy is not only stupid but foolheardy.

Using the N word against someone he considers black and calling blacks nonhuman on an AA forum is plying Russian Roulette. I mean you might just tick off the Black Panthers who are already ticked off with the Trayvon thing-they might assume you are a gloater and-track you down.

But one benefit of being dumb is that the dumb don’t worry about such things. Ignorance is bliss.
Harris The Berber

Harrisburg, PA

#3 Sep 3, 2013
Harris The Berber

Harrisburg is the capital city of Pennsylvania. As of 2011, the city had a population of 49,673, making it the ninth-largest city in Pennsylvania.[5] Harrisburg is also the county seat of Dauphin County[6] and lies on the east bank of the Susquehanna River, 105 miles (169 km) west-northwest of Philadelphia and 204 miles (328 km) east of Pittsburgh.

The Harrisburg-Carlisle Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes Dauphin, Cumberland, and Perry counties, had a population of 509,074 in 2000 and grew to 549,850 in 2010. A July 1, 2007 estimate placed the population at 528,892, making it the fifth largest Metropolitan Statistical Area in Pennsylvania after Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Allentown−Bethlehem −Easton (the Lehigh Valley), and Scranton−Wilkes Barre.[7] The Harrisburg-Carlisle-Lebanon Combined Statistical Area, including both the Harrisburg-Carlisle and Lebanon Metropolitan Statistical Areas, had an estimated population of 656,781 in 2007 and was the fourth-most populous metropolitan area in the state.[8]

Harrisburg played a notable role in American history during the Westward Migration, the American Civil War, and the Industrial Revolution. During part of the 19th century, the building of the Pennsylvania Canal and later the Pennsylvania Railroad allowed Harrisburg to become one of the most industrialized cities in the Northeastern United States. The U.S. Navy ship USS Harrisburg, which served from 1918 to 1919 at the end of World War I, was named in honor of the city.

In the mid-to-late 20th century, the city's economic fortunes fluctuated with its major industries consisting of government, heavy manufacturing including the production of steel, agriculture (the greater Harrisburg area is at the heart of the fertile Pennsylvania Dutch Country), and food services (nearby Hershey is home of the chocolate maker, located just 10 miles (16 km) east of Harrisburg). In 1981, following contractions in the steel and dairy industries, Harrisburg was declared the second most distressed city in the nation.[9] The city subsequently experienced a resurgence under its former mayor Stephen R. Reed,[10] with nearly $3 billion in new investment realized during his lengthy tenure.[11]

The Pennsylvania Farm Show, the largest free indoor agriculture exposition in the United States, was first held in Harrisburg in 1917 and has been held there every early-to-mid January since then.[12] Harrisburg also hosts an annual outdoor sports show, the largest of its kind in North America, as well as an auto show, which features a large static display of new as well as classic cars and is renowned nationwide. Harrisburg is also known for the Three Mile Island accident, which occurred on March 28, 1979 near Middletown.

In 2010 Forbes rated Harrisburg as the second best place in the U.S. to raise a family.[13] Despite the city's recent financial troubles, in 2010 The Daily Beast website ranked 20 metropolitan areas across the country as being recession-proof, and the Harrisburg region landed at No. 7.[14] The financial stability of the region is in part due to the high concentration of state and federal government agencies. The finances of the city itself however, have been poorly managed and its inability to repay its bond debt has created an ongoing fiscal crisis.[15][16]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harrisburg,_Penn...
Harris The Berber

Harrisburg, PA

#4 Sep 3, 2013
Take a minute to remember all that Dauphin County has to offer: Jeff Haste
Print Patriot-News Op-Ed By Patriot-News Op-Ed
on August 18, 2013 at 11:00 AM, updated August 19, 2013 at 6:23 PM
By Jeff Haste
The past few weeks once again showed all central Pennsylvania has to offer.
Earlier this month, kids and adults alike able to experience the wonders of the outdoors for free at the annual Ned Smith Center Nature and Arts Festival in Millersburg, which featured everything from programs on owls and plants to honeybees.
The Band Perry and "The Voice"€&#153 ; winner Cassadee Pope opened at Hersheypark Stadium for Journey and Rascal Flatts, all adding up to a fantastic show.
The Dauphin County Cultural Fest this month brought more than 8,000 people to downtown Harrisburg to celebrate diversity in the midstate, showcasing a variety of local recording artists, ethnic food, crafts and much more.
An already amazing month got even better when one of Harrisburg'€&#153 ;s own, mixed martial artist Phil "Mr. Wonderful"€& #153; Davis, beat former light heavyweight champion Lyoto Machida in a match held in Rio de Janeiro. A former All-American wrestler at Penn State, Davis won a unanimous decision over the division's No. 1 contender.
Lately, we'€™ve had some knocks, to be sure. But in true central Pennsylvania fashion, we are coming together and working it out.
Another Harrisburg native also came to town: Philadelphia Eagles running back LeSean McCoy signed autographs, footballs and jerseys during a day full of games and activities at the city's Reservoir Park.
And for only the second time in the history of the State Games of America, this Olympic-style competition featuring the best amateur athletes in more than 30 sports came to the East Coast from July 30 to Aug. 28, attracting thousands of visitors from across the country to various events held throughout the Midstate.
During the opening ceremonies at Hershey'€™s Giant Center, Hyleas Fountain, a Harrisburg native who won the 2008 Olympic silver medal in the heptathlon, delivered the keynote address.
Why am I bringing all this up? Because sometimes I think we fail to appreciate everything that makes Dauphin County and our entire region such a great place to live and work.
Look at just a sampling of what we have: scenic trails through acres of wooded game lands; Harrisburg's Riverfront Park along the Susquehanna; City Island and the recently refurbished home of the Senators, now a minor league park to rival any in the country; the Farm Show Complex, soon to house an outstanding outdoor sportsman's show; all the attractions of the Hershey area, which include not only the world-famous amusement park but local draws such as the new Troeg's brewery and restaurant.
This list doesn't even begin to scratch the surface of all that makes the midstate special.

http://www.pennlive.com/opinion/index.ssf/201...

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#5 Sep 3, 2013
Take a minute to remember all that Dauphin County has to offer: Jeff Haste
Print Patriot-News Op-Ed By Patriot-News Op-Ed
on August 18, 2013 at 11:00 AM, updated August 19, 2013 at 6:23 PM
By Jeff Haste

The past few weeks once again showed all central Pennsylvania has to offer.
Earlier this month, kids and adults alike able to experience the wonders of the outdoors for free at the annual Ned Smith Center Nature and Arts Festival in Millersburg, which featured everything from programs on owls and plants to honeybees.

The Band Perry and "The Voice"€&#153 ; winner Cassadee Pope opened at Hersheypark Stadium for Journey and Rascal Flatts, all adding up to a fantastic show.
The Dauphin County Cultural Fest this month brought more than 8,000 people to downtown Harrisburg to celebrate diversity in the midstate, showcasing a variety of local recording artists, ethnic food, crafts and much more.

An already amazing month got even better when one of Harrisburg'€&#153 ;s own, mixed martial artist Phil "Mr. Wonderful"€& #153; Davis, beat former light heavyweight champion Lyoto Machida in a match held in Rio de Janeiro. A former All-American wrestler at Penn State, Davis won a unanimous decision over the division's No. 1 contender.
Lately, weve had some knocks, to be sure. But in true central Pennsylvania fashion, we are coming together and working it out.
Another Harrisburg native also came to town: Philadelphia Eagles running back LeSean McCoy signed autographs, footballs and jerseys during a day full of games and activities at the city's Reservoir Park.

And for only the second time in the history of the State Games of America, this Olympic-style competition featuring the best amateur athletes in more than 30 sports came to the East Coast from July 30 to Aug. 28, attracting thousands of visitors from across the country to various events held throughout the Midstate.

During the opening ceremonies at Hershey'€™s Giant Center, Hyleas Fountain, a Harrisburg native who won the 2008 Olympic silver medal in the heptathlon, delivered the keynote address.

Why am I bringing all this up? Because sometimes I think we fail to appreciate everything that makes Dauphin County and our entire region such a great place to live and work.
Look at just a sampling of what we have: scenic trails through acres of wooded game lands; Harrisburg's Riverfront Park along the Susquehanna; City Island and the recently refurbished home of the Senators, now a minor league park to rival any in the country; the Farm Show Complex, soon to house an outstanding outdoor sportsman's show; all the attractions of the Hershey area, which include not only the world-famous amusement park but local draws such as the new Troeg's brewery and restaurant.
This list doesn't even begin to scratch the surface of all that makes the midstate special.

http://www.pennlive.com/opinion/index.ssf/201 ...
Skiff Tae Kwan Do

Athens, GA

#6 Sep 3, 2013
Heap Of Big Shit wrote:
Trust me.
Oook Oook Ahhhhhhyeeeee Unghkk Ungk!!!
?????
Skiff Africa

Athens, GA

#7 Sep 3, 2013
You cave monkeys better not ignore this or one of these young cave chimps may get up in yo azz!!;
Horror as three high school soccer players arrested for raping three young boys at a summer sports camp in brutal 'hazing'

Galileo Mondol. 17, and two 16-year-old students are accused of raping three freshmen in their cabins
Officials have condemned the attacks and praised the courage of those who stood up for the victims
All three suspects are in custody, will be arraigned Tuesday

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#8 Sep 3, 2013
Skiff Tae Kwan Do wrote:
<quoted text>
?????
It’s just doing what comes natural to it.
Heap Big Chief

Le Kremlin-bicêtre, France

#9 Sep 3, 2013
LMMFLWAO!

Look at my slave-descended nighurs chimping over the ORDER given to them by me, their White Master. They will be obedient nighurs or they will be WHIPPED nighurs, hehehehe...
Harris The Berber

Harrisburg, PA

#11 Sep 3, 2013
Harrisburg: A Brief History

By Jeb Stuart

Inhabited by native Americans for at least eight thousand years before the arrival of European explorers, the site of present-day Harrisburg has had a long history of human settlement and service as a center of commerce and transportation.

In the 1600s, the Swedish and French first visited this site at the base of the Blue Ridge Mountains, but no colonial settlement was made. Perhaps as early as 1710, however, Englishman John Harris chose it as the place to establish his trading post and later, ferry service. It was where long-established paths of the Shawnee and Delaware tribes converged at a river crossing; a crossing where the mouth of the fertile Cumberland Valley intersected with the natural passage of the Susquehanna River gaps to the north. It was where the surge of westward moving pioneers would follow the ancient tribal paths to ford the Susquehanna that Harrisburg would be born.

John Harris emigrated first to Philadelphia from Yorkshire, England, and later to Lancaster County. As a pioneer, he wished to venture farther west to build a productive life in a new land. Through his Philadelphia contacts, Harris received a land grant of 800 acres, on what is now the site of downtown Harrisburg and part of Shipoke.

Over a half century would elapse before an actual town developed at "Harris Ferry." In 1785, John Harris, Jr., Harris’ son, and William Maclay, Pennsylvania’s first U.S. senator, planned a village just north of the ferry crossing. The town was similar to the plan of Philadelphia with such familiar street names as Market, Chestnut, Walnut and Pine. In doing so, four acres of land were set aside for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania on which it was hoped the state capitol would ultimately be located. Also in 1785, Dauphin County was carved from Lancaster County and the county seat was established in the new settlement of today’s Harrisburg. For a brief time after the new country was formed, the town was called Louisburg, but the name Harrisburg became official and final in 1791.

Harrisburg grew quickly after its incorporation by Act of the State legislature in 1791, mainly due to being a market center for surrounding rural areas and a stop-over for travelers who purchased goods and services. In 1794, Theophile Cazenove, a Frenchman traveling in Pennsylvania, wrote of Harrisburg: "This city is one of America’s little phenomena, in the matter of rapidity of its rise. There are about a thousand lots and already 300 houses neatly built in brick or logs and mortar, two stories high …. 32 taverns and eighteen merchants keeping in their stores European merchandise."

By 1810, the State Legislature, recognizing Harrisburg’s growth and strategic central location in the state, fulfilled John Harris II’s dream by approving the move of the state capital, once in Philadelphia, from Lancaster to Harrisburg. The move was completed in 1812. The first capitol building, Federal in style, was completed in 1820 and sat on a hill just north of the original four-acre reservation that now comprises Capitol Park. Harrisburg’s long and colorful political history was thus launched as the mecca for the decision-making process that was key in shaping the future directions of the commonwealth and the nation.

The borough’s base of commerce in the first half of the 19th century was also unfolding as evidenced by the establishment of the grist mills, saw mills and brick yards along Paxton Creek (now the Cameron Corridor industrial area and the city’s portion of the New Baldwin Corridor Enterprise Zone), all necessary to meet the demands of an emerging economy. The Paxton Creek area became more industrialized after the establishment in 1826 of the Pennsylvania Canal and in 1837 of the first railroad line that later became the mighty Pennsylvania Railroad.

http://www.harrisburgarchives.org/history/har...
Harris The Berber

Harrisburg, PA

#13 Sep 3, 2013
As Paxton Creek represented a low-lying secondary waterway running parallel to and as a tributary of the Susquehanna River, transportation systems evolved along its course, spurring industrial growth there rather than on the main bank of the river.

This resulted in Harrisburg’s ability to retain and develop a magnificent riverfront that by the turn of the 20th century would become the initial focus of Harrisburg’s "City Beautiful Movement." Front Street, along the river bank, was Harrisburg’s most prestigious street from the very beginning. The mansion house of John Harris II, with its earliest part dating from 1740, and now open to the public as a splendid museum, was on what became the south end of Front Street. This set the trend of early Pennsylvania governors and Harrisburg’s "first families" living in elegant Front Street residences, many of which survive today. The present Govenor’s residence is at North Front and Maclay Streets.

As the borough continued to develop, ferry activity was replaced in 1817 by the first bridge to span the 3,000-foot-wide Susquehanna at Harrisburg. Known as the "Camelback" (site of the present-day Market Street Bridge) due to its arched appearance between piers, the bridge, which was also a covered bridge, made Harrisburg more accessible to the farmers of Cumberland County, across the river, resulting in increased commerce for the area.

More bridges would follow and be replaced over time for rail, pedestrian and vehicle passage. Among the most famous, the eastern span of which is preserved today, is the iron-trussed Walnut Street Bridge, constructed in 1888 to break the toll monopoly enjoyed by the Camelback. The Walnut Street Bridge, first known as the People’s Bridge because of its low toll, survives the Camelback as the oldest bridge on the Susquehanna and the oldest steel-span bridge of its type in the nation.

http://www.harrisburgarchives.org/history/har...
Harris The Berber

Harrisburg, PA

#14 Sep 3, 2013
By the mid-19th century, Harrisburg had its own water system, reservoir, pump house and gas company. Iron and steel-making plants were established along Paxton Creek providing materials to other Harrisburg factories for the manufacture of railroad cars and steam boilers. This industrial growth resulted in the boom of residential construction and population that lead to Harrisburg’s incorporation by an Act of the State Legislature as a city in 1860.

During the Civil War, Harrisburg, because it was the state capital and located only 40 miles north of the Mason-Dixon Line, served as a central location for the assembly and dispatch of many regiments of Union troops. Camp Curtin, named for Pennsylvania’s wartime governor, was located in today’s uptown Harrisburg. More Union troops were mustered into service at Camp Curtin than at any other facility in the Union or Confederacy. Confederate General Robert E. Lee twice made the taking of Harrisburg and Camp Curtin a primary objective. The first effort was in September, 1862, but ended with the Battle of Antietam, the bloodiest day in U.S. history, with Confederate troops returning to Virginia. The second campaign was in June of 1863.

The Confederates came close to invading Harrisburg and ventured as far as Bridgeport (now called Lemoyne), located just across the river. The northern-most fight of the war occurred at Sporting Hill and Oyster Point, just 2.5 miles from the city. Instead of Harrisburg, however, the South met the bulk of the Union troops at nearby Gettysburg, and the pivotal battle of the Civil War ensued on July 1st, 2nd and 3rd. Although Harrisburg was not taken, its importance in the war is recognized to this day as a focus for Civil War enthusiasts and living history reinactors and is now honored by the establishment of the National Civil War Museum in the city, the largest museum in the world, focused on the Civil War and the only one to include both Union and Confederate artifacts and to comprehensively cover the periods before, during and after the conflict.

The city’s population dramatically increased from 1860 to 1880, growing from 13,405 in 1860 to 23,104 in 1870; and to 30,762 in 1880. Much of this growth resulted not only from increases in manufacturing employment but also from the large number of railroad workers, as Harrisburg was now a major rail center. By 1891, streetcars were electrified, allowing easy passage to outer areas that were gradually annexed into the city. These annexations became more numerous and occurred well into the 20th century as subdivision plans were filed.

One of the most important events that occurred in Harrisburg’s history was a fire that destroyed the original state capitol in 1897. With plans drawn for a new capitol, erected on the same site and completed and dedicated by President Theodore Roosevelt, in 1906, the community recognized the need for major public improvements throughout the city. Hence, what became known as the "City Beautiful Movement" was launched in Harrisburg in the first years of the new century, involving massive expansion of improvements to the city’s park and public works systems. These included the construction of the famous river wall steps that line the waterfront, erection of a water filtration plant, extensive street paving projects, damming of the Susquehanna River for sanitary purposes and enhanced recreational opportunities, a long range master plan for design of the State Capitol Complex, and numerous water, sewer and other infrastructure improvements, nearly all of which exist today. Only since 1982 has Harrisburg experienced a similar period of extensive improvement efforts and development, which continues now.

http://www.harrisburgarchives.org/history/har...
Harris The Berber

Harrisburg, PA

#15 Sep 3, 2013
Completion of the new state capitol also spirited a surge in commercial office, hotel and retail construction in the city’s central business district giving initial shape to the skyline of today. During the first decades of the 20th century such early high-rises as the Telegraph, Union Trust and Kunkel buildings presented office space for lease showing the advent of service-oriented industries in a new era. Department stores such as Bowman and Co. and Dive, Pomeroy and Stewart grew from modest storefronts into classy downtown edifices and destination points from miles around.

During the early part of the 1900s through the 1930s, the palatial Penn Harris and Harrisburger Hotels rose to grace the edges of Capitol Park; the State Capitol Complex continued to expand northward; Bellevue Park, central Pennsylvania’s first planned community, was developed; new high schools were completed; and important cultural institutions, such as the Harrisburg Symphony and Harrisburg Community Theater, were founded. Although Harrisburg suffered from many of the urban problems that started in the mid-1950s and have plagued most cities since, the city’s achieved and projected development now continues to keep pace with its distinction as being the Commonwealth’s seat of government.

Now in the 21th century, reflection upon the historic factors which have cumulatively shaped the Harrisburg of today gives additional insight to how the city will continue to grow and mature.

http://www.harrisburgarchives.org/history/har...
White Lord of Kenya

Nairobi, Kenya

#16 Sep 3, 2013
I ignore the Harrisburg nighur. I don't read any of its ooks and eeks.
Skiff Izlaam

Atlanta, GA

#17 Sep 3, 2013
White Lord of Faggots wrote:
I ignore the Harrisburg nighur. I don't read any of its ooks and eeks.
You're a monkey and you're not supposed to be reading or typing. Your white mammy typed your response because she feels sorry for you.
Nubian king

Harrisburg, PA

#18 Sep 3, 2013
Watusi Warrior

Harrisburg, PA

#19 Sep 3, 2013
Watusi Warrior

Harrisburg, PA

#21 Sep 3, 2013
Watusi Warrior

Harrisburg, PA

#22 Sep 3, 2013
No Limit Honkey wrote:
Look at my little insignificant nighurs ooking and eeking over their White Master's orders, LMMFLWAO! Pathetic little slave-begotten monkeys, hehehe!
Oh, and as a reminder, your Human Overlords don't click your links or read your pathetically ridiculous posts.
You apes simply aren't worth it. You're only nighurs.
http://www.google.com/imgres...

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#23 Sep 3, 2013

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