Do people read real books anymore
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Level 7

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#83 May 25, 2013
Jesuspieceand love wrote:
<quoted text>
Well, I give you props. Thumbs up, you have great communication skills.
Well Mademoiselle is no slouch in the communication department either!

“Perfection is impossible”

Level 5

Since: May 13

But excellence is close enough

#84 May 25, 2013
Cogito2 wrote:
<quoted text>
LOL! You misunderstood. I was 6'1" in elementary school. I eventually grew to be 6'9" 1/2. So, I was too big to get away with anything, so misbehaving was not an option for me!
Oh man! Yeah, your way taller than my boyfriend, lol. Hehe, if you were shorter, do you think you would create more mischief?
Level 7

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#85 May 25, 2013
Jesuspieceand love wrote:
<quoted text>
Oh man! Yeah, your way taller than my boyfriend, lol. Hehe, if you were shorter, do you think you would create more mischief?
Well, I would have been able to conceal my mischeft in the crowd....so maybe, but when you are 7 or 8 inches taller than you class mates...not a chance....lol!

“Perfection is impossible”

Level 5

Since: May 13

But excellence is close enough

#86 May 25, 2013
Cogito2 wrote:
<quoted text>
Well Mademoiselle is no slouch in the communication department either!
Awww shucks, lol. I'm not that good, I'm still learning. I just completing a communication application class, it taught me a lot about the real world.

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#87 May 26, 2013
"Roots" was a good read.

“Africa”

Level 7

Since: Jan 12

Oakland

#88 May 26, 2013
Jesuspieceand love wrote:
<quoted text>
I like that! Do you enjoy reading these particular books because in some way it relates to you? That's the reason I enjoy reading books and novels written by African Americans.:)
Well of course I read them because they relate to me. However, it is a lot more complex than that.

I want to understand Black people, and particularly African Blacks.

It was around a year and a half ago that I became interested in understanding why it is that Africa is the way it is now, and how it got there. Growing up, I was never into history, which is ironic because it is now the main subject that I read about. The reason for my former distaste is because I was only ever really taught white history, and because I could have, then, cared less about white history or their achievements, I couldn't identify with it, and therefore, sought not to concern myself with it.

I never really acquired much of an interest in AA history as most of what I was exposed to was about slavery or civil rights. I learned very little or essentially nothing about Malcolm X or the Black Power movement, nothing about Marcus Garvey and Pan Africanism, slave rebellions, scientific invention and intellectual achievements, or anything else that might have otherwise made AA history more intriguing and inspiring for me; and definitely nothing about Africa.

It wasn't until after I became an adult that information about African history became known and important to me. It was at this time, and even a little bit before it, that I also became exposed to pan Africanist philosophy from the likes of Marcus Garvey, Kwame Nkrumah, Chancellor Williams, Walter Rodney, Kwame Nkumah and others.

When I look at the Japanese, the Jews as well as Europeans, I see that they have strong and vibrant cultural backgrounds, and are always showcasing this in their literature, their music, their art, and their stories. Through these things they engender among their own a strong sense of ethnic solidarity. Their culture is the driving force for their success.

In order for Africans and Diasporans to become more successful, they too must manifest a culture that invigorates such levels of success.

Reading other peoples' histories, such as Ancient Greeks, the Japanese, the Arabs, and the later Western Europeans, I learn how these people started off at a very simple stage, and through the appropriation of other peoples' cultural and intellectual elements, took in principles that worked to their advantage and followed models that lead to their own advancement and eventual prominence.

If Blacks are to do the same, we must follow the examples of others that have succeeded in the same endevour, but in such a way as to still possess an authentically African culture. In order to do such a thing, one must not only learn about African culture and history, but also world history and world achievement, in order to gain a greater perspective on how others managed in similar situations and learn from their lessons.

I tend to look at learning African history and culture in more of a practical manner than just mere self-discovery. I see it as a model to be built upon when refining and redefining what comprises African culture, and to do so in a manner that it can be used as a tool for African ascension.

“Perfection is impossible”

Level 5

Since: May 13

But excellence is close enough

#89 May 26, 2013
Brainiac2 wrote:
"Roots" was a good read.
Yes it was. I even like the movie.

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#90 May 26, 2013
The Robe (film)- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Robe_ (film)
The Robe is a 1953 American Biblical epic film that tells the story of a Roman ... Caligula for a defiant Greek slave Demetrius (Victor Mature) and winning. Angrily ...

Good read.

“Yes WE Can! Yes we Will!”

Level 8

Since: Jul 07

Baltimore, Md.

#91 Feb 2, 2014
Bfarmah wrote:
With all the technology available does anybody actually buy and read real hard cover books?
Those are the only kinds I've read. Hardback and paperback books. I don't even have a e-book version of my own writings.
Stag_R_Lee

Scottsdale, AZ

#92 Feb 2, 2014
Bakari Neferu wrote:
<quoted text>
Well of course I read them because they relate to me. However, it is a lot more complex than that.
I want to understand Black people, and particularly African Blacks.
It was around a year and a half ago that I became interested in understanding why it is that Africa is the way it is now, and how it got there. Growing up, I was never into history, which is ironic because it is now the main subject that I read about. The reason for my former distaste is because I was only ever really taught white history, and because I could have, then, cared less about white history or their achievements, I couldn't identify with it, and therefore, sought not to concern myself with it.
I never really acquired much of an interest in AA history as most of what I was exposed to was about slavery or civil rights. I learned very little or essentially nothing about Malcolm X or the Black Power movement, nothing about Marcus Garvey and Pan Africanism, slave rebellions, scientific invention and intellectual achievements, or anything else that might have otherwise made AA history more intriguing and inspiring for me; and definitely nothing about Africa.
It wasn't until after I became an adult that information about African history became known and important to me. It was at this time, and even a little bit before it, that I also became exposed to pan Africanist philosophy from the likes of Marcus Garvey, Kwame Nkrumah, Chancellor Williams, Walter Rodney, Kwame Nkumah and others.
When I look at the Japanese, the Jews as well as Europeans, I see that they have strong and vibrant cultural backgrounds, and are always showcasing this in their literature, their music, their art, and their stories. Through these things they engender among their own a strong sense of ethnic solidarity. Their culture is the driving force for their success.
In order for Africans and Diasporans to become more successful, they too must manifest a culture that invigorates such levels of success.
Reading other peoples' histories, such as Ancient Greeks, the Japanese, the Arabs, and the later Western Europeans, I learn how these people started off at a very simple stage, and through the appropriation of other peoples' cultural and intellectual elements, took in principles that worked to their advantage and followed models that lead to their own advancement and eventual prominence.
If Blacks are to do the same, we must follow the examples of others that have succeeded in the same endevour, but in such a way as to still possess an authentically African culture. In order to do such a thing, one must not only learn about African culture and history, but also world history and world achievement, in order to gain a greater perspective on how others managed in similar situations and learn from their lessons.
I tend to look at learning African history and culture in more of a practical manner than just mere self-discovery. I see it as a model to be built upon when refining and redefining what comprises African culture, and to do so in a manner that it can be used as a tool for African ascension.
Extremely, extremely interesting comment. Thanks.

Level 7

Since: Jul 08

Location hidden

#93 Feb 2, 2014
Savant wrote:
<quoted text>Those are the only kinds I've read. Hardback and paperback books. I don't even have a e-book version of my own writings.
I have one and while I can carry a ton of reading material on me, there is nothing quite like physically turning a page.

“The REAL Founding Fathers!!!!!”

Since: Jun 08

Oakland

#94 Feb 2, 2014
DerekJ wrote:
<quoted text>
I have one and while I can carry a ton of reading material on me, there is nothing quite like physically turning a page.
Hi Derek. I agree. I love buying and reading books. I hope you and yours are well and enjoying your weekend.........:

Level 7

Since: Jul 08

Location hidden

#95 Feb 2, 2014
NotSoDivineMsM wrote:
<quoted text>Hi Derek. I agree. I love buying and reading books. I hope you and yours are well and enjoying your weekend.........:
Definitely doing well. Hope you are too. Just returned from a ski trip in VT and now at a small getting ready to watch the game.
Masud_S_Hoghughi __

London, UK

#96 Feb 3, 2014
mosdt blax r illiterate.........
Masud_S_Hoghughi __

London, UK

#97 Feb 3, 2014
*most
Stag_R_Lee

Scottsdale, AZ

#98 Feb 3, 2014
DerekJ wrote:
<quoted text>
Definitely doing well. Hope you are too. Just returned from a ski trip in VT and now at a small getting ready to watch the game.
Please excuse this interruption, but may I ask exactly what "game" you had in mind? What I saw Sunday would be synonymous with a skier yelling "SLOOOOOPE"

Level 7

Since: Jul 08

Location hidden

#99 Feb 3, 2014
Stag_R_Lee wrote:
<quoted text>Please excuse this interruption, but may I ask exactly what "game" you had in mind? What I saw Sunday would be synonymous with a skier yelling "SLOOOOOPE"
LOL! Yeah, I would be asking for a refund after that performance.

“I'm a proud grandma”

Level 7

Since: Feb 12

Location hidden

#100 Feb 3, 2014
Yes, I read all the time, usually hardcover books. I don't even own a kindle. Every once in a while I will listen to an audiobook in my car to pass the time.

My current read is "Long Division" by Kiese Laymon.

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