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Bfarmah

High Point, NC

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#1
May 24, 2013
 
With all the technology available does anybody actually buy and read real hard cover books?

“Perfection is impossible”

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#2
May 24, 2013
 
Bfarmah wrote:
With all the technology available does anybody actually buy and read real hard cover books?
That's a very interesting question. I do. That's because I'm in college and it's required, but I do enjoy the intriguing information and how my imagination runs wild (cliche) in a book. However, seeing how technology innovation is rapid and efficient, the majority use it to recieve results faster, instead of reading a whole book. Hey did you ever read "Is Google Making Us Stupid?" by Nicholas Carr?
Bfarmah

High Point, NC

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#3
May 24, 2013
 

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Exactly, its kind of weird that such a wonderful thing is aiding in the dumbing down of the world. I don't think many people have the patients for books anymore.

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#4
May 25, 2013
 
Bfarmah wrote:
Exactly, its kind of weird that such a wonderful thing is aiding in the dumbing down of the world. I don't think many people have the patients for books anymore.
Yes, your absolutly right. Since everything is fast, moving slow us not favored. People today just want to get things done; because there's an option of completing things with a quicker pace, it's well-favored by many. I believe Nicholas Carr is speaking the truth.

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#5
May 25, 2013
 
I actually read far more than I watch the idiot box, it's my favorite past time. In fact, though I have an E-reader, I still prefer the feel of a physical book in my hand, turning the pages, savoring each page.

The internet has it's utility, but it allows one to shortcut the learning process and thus, robs people of the basics, the fundamentals, the importance if you will, of how to learn.

I remember growing up having to learn the Dewey decimal system in library, having to find the book and actually read it from cover to cover, however now, one can simply Google information and be done with it. And while that may be expedient and convenient, it adversely affect one's retention and recall abilities.

Were I marooned on an island, books would definitely be one of the items I would have to have!
Bfarmah

High Point, NC

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#6
May 25, 2013
 

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I bet if you mentioned the Dewey decimal system to someone today they'd look at you like a three headed alien. Then they would google it of course

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#7
May 25, 2013
 
Bfarmah wrote:
I bet if you mentioned the Dewey decimal system to someone today they'd look at you like a three headed alien. Then they would google it of course
Bwahahahahaha! That's funny but probably true!

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#8
May 25, 2013
 
Cogito2 wrote:
I actually read far more than I watch the idiot box, it's my favorite past time. In fact, though I have an E-reader, I still prefer the feel of a physical book in my hand, turning the pages, savoring each page.
The internet has it's utility, but it allows one to shortcut the learning process and thus, robs people of the basics, the fundamentals, the importance if you will, of how to learn.
I remember growing up having to learn the Dewey decimal system in library, having to find the book and actually read it from cover to cover, however now, one can simply Google information and be done with it. And while that may be expedient and convenient, it adversely affect one's retention and recall abilities.
Were I marooned on an island, books would definitely be one of the items I would have to have!
There really is no substitute for the feel of an actual book in hand. I recently bought a tablet and I absolutely love it for its convenience. I can haul around a ton of books if I want but if the power were to go out, I'd be SOL.

You're right, the use of card catalogs is long gone and the age of instant information is here. It's the same for legal research. We learned the old manual method but with the advent of Westlaw and Lexis, research that used to take hours is down to minutes. My manual research skills are embarrassingly rusty. The library at my office is gone and we now use the space as conference area.

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#9
May 25, 2013
 
DerekJ wrote:
<quoted text>
There really is no substitute for the feel of an actual book in hand. I recently bought a tablet and I absolutely love it for its convenience. I can haul around a ton of books if I want but if the power were to go out, I'd be SOL.
You're right, the use of card catalogs is long gone and the age of instant information is here. It's the same for legal research. We learned the old manual method but with the advent of Westlaw and Lexis, research that used to take hours is down to minutes. My manual research skills are embarrassingly rusty. The library at my office is gone and we now use the space as conference area.
LOL! My old man is a retired judge and he often lamented the changes that the expedience of the internet brought along with it. He was of course, old school and felt that a true understanding of law could not be achieved absent of the methodical old school way.

I was blessed to grow up in an atmosphere where both my mother and father had an appreciation for the written and spoken word and shared their passion early on with their kids. I have always viewed words as intellectual nutrients that without them, the brain would atrophy, so reading has always been an essential part of my intellectual diet. And much like food....I love to consume books!

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#10
May 25, 2013
 
Cogito2 wrote:
<quoted text>
LOL! My old man is a retired judge and he often lamented the changes that the expedience of the internet brought along with it. He was of course, old school and felt that a true understanding of law could not be achieved absent of the methodical old school way.
I was blessed to grow up in an atmosphere where both my mother and father had an appreciation for the written and spoken word and shared their passion early on with their kids. I have always viewed words as intellectual nutrients that without them, the brain would atrophy, so reading has always been an essential part of my intellectual diet. And much like food....I love to consume books!
I'm with your dad on that. I have a set of my most frequently used statutes on the credenza in my office. They're all marked up, highlighted and sticky-noted. My personal lifeline.

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#11
May 25, 2013
 
Bfarmah wrote:
I bet if you mentioned the Dewey decimal system to someone today they'd look at you like a three headed alien. Then they would google it of course
I know that is true. I'm going to test it just for the fun of it.

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#12
May 25, 2013
 
Cogito2 wrote:
I actually read far more than I watch the idiot box, it's my favorite past time. In fact, though I have an E-reader, I still prefer the feel of a physical book in my hand, turning the pages, savoring each page.
The internet has it's utility, but it allows one to shortcut the learning process and thus, robs people of the basics, the fundamentals, the importance if you will, of how to learn.
I remember growing up having to learn the Dewey decimal system in library, having to find the book and actually read it from cover to cover, however now, one can simply Google information and be done with it. And while that may be expedient and convenient, it adversely affect one's retention and recall abilities.
Were I marooned on an island, books would definitely be one of the items I would have to have!
That's the right connotation, "The idiot Box" including the television screen, computer screen, and etc. I'm glad that I wasn't raised with all these gadgets such as the cell phone. I didn't even receive a cell phone till I was 18 years old. Modern society, the average child receives a phone at the age of 12. Also, the television, creating thinner screen televisions, also, allowing people to watch television on and iPad, I phone, I give up. Lol.(corny joke) Modern society has dumbed down do search engines, and spark notes and Wikipedia, which might not be accurate, but as long as its on the screen, several will believe the information displayed before them. Like I said previously, I'm glad I wasn't raised with electronics shoved in ny face like the majority of children today. I was so fortunate that I don't put full-reliability on something that can decrease my thinking, analytical, and problem solving skills. Now innovation is increasing, each few months, a faster phone, computer, I pad, is being created, and like water, people just have to have it. It might seem like humans are getting smarter, but no, we now (most) rely on the computer to seek results. We have let other gadgetry to the thinking for us.

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#13
May 25, 2013
 
to=do

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#14
May 25, 2013
 

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Jesuspieceand love wrote:
<quoted text>
That's the right connotation, "The idiot Box" including the television screen, computer screen, and etc. I'm glad that I wasn't raised with all these gadgets such as the cell phone. I didn't even receive a cell phone till I was 18 years old. Modern society, the average child receives a phone at the age of 12. Also, the television, creating thinner screen televisions, also, allowing people to watch television on and iPad, I phone, I give up. Lol.(corny joke) Modern society has dumbed down do search engines, and spark notes and Wikipedia, which might not be accurate, but as long as its on the screen, several will believe the information displayed before them. Like I said previously, I'm glad I wasn't raised with electronics shoved in ny face like the majority of children today. I was so fortunate that I don't put full-reliability on something that can decrease my thinking, analytical, and problem solving skills. Now innovation is increasing, each few months, a faster phone, computer, I pad, is being created, and like water, people just have to have it. It might seem like humans are getting smarter, but no, we now (most) rely on the computer to seek results. We have let other gadgetry to the thinking for us.
When you think about it, it's actually quite ingenuous on the part of the ruling elite. The intended and unintended consequences of technology is that it short cuts the learning and critical thinking and development process. It allows people to defer their critically thinking obligations to others; to outsource their cogitation to institutionally sanctioned experts via instantaneous media. And of course, the less capable we are of critically thinking and analyzing things, the more susceptible we are to their political and social machinations.

Back in the day, you had to do the research and work your way through the permutations if you were to pass a college exam...especially the oral ones. Now, young heads are being robbed of this process, not to mention it impacts on their ability to delay gratification in all things, decreasing their attention span, proving that all innovation is not necessarily a good thing!

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#15
May 25, 2013
 
Cogito2 wrote:
<quoted text>
When you think about it, it's actually quite ingenuous on the part of the ruling elite. The intended and unintended consequences of technology is that it short cuts the learning and critical thinking and development process. It allows people to defer their critically thinking obligations to others; to outsource their cogitation to institutionally sanctioned experts via instantaneous media. And of course, the less capable we are of critically thinking and analyzing things, the more susceptible we are to their political and social machinations.
Back in the day, you had to do the research and work your way through the permutations if you were to pass a college exam...especially the oral ones. Now, young heads are being robbed of this process, not to mention it impacts on their ability to delay gratification in all things, decreasing their attention span, proving that all innovation is not necessarily a good thing!
You make throw a lot of good points out there Cogito2. In high school, if you carry a book, numerous of children would laugh or look at you in awe, surprised that you are carrying such historical antique. Lol. Additionally, throwing a little humor out there, my friend carries a laptop with a case around it that resembles a book, so no one would steal it. Lol.

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#16
May 25, 2013
 
Delete "make"

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#17
May 25, 2013
 

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Jesuspieceand love wrote:
<quoted text>
You make throw a lot of good points out there Cogito2. In high school, if you carry a book, numerous of children would laugh or look at you in awe, surprised that you are carrying such historical antique. Lol. Additionally, throwing a little humor out there, my friend carries a laptop with a case around it that resembles a book, so no one would steal it. Lol.
LOL! That's funny! We used to say that if you were a black fugitive from justice on the run, the last place the cops would look for you would be in the Library!

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#18
May 25, 2013
 
Bfarmah wrote:
With all the technology available does anybody actually buy and read real hard cover books?
I can download a 300 dollar book for free.

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#19
May 25, 2013
 
I like to read real books. I spend enough time all day staring at the computer at work, so I get a break from that. I also like to read the newspaper with my morning coffee as well.

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#20
May 25, 2013
 

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Cogito2 wrote:
<quoted text>
LOL! That's funny! We used to say that if you were a black fugitive from justice on the run, the last place the cops would look for you would be in the Library!
HAHAHAHA!!!!!!! Lol. That's hysterical, next thing you know, everyone is in the library. The secret is out!:)

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