BM get back 2 the guitar!

Since: May 12

Location hidden

#69 Dec 11, 2012
Redefined wrote:
<quoted text>
WOW!!! This is really GOOD!
it's garbage... Utter garbage.
SMFH.
-AAA-

Hockley, TX

#71 Dec 11, 2012
Uru, your people(Caribbeans and Africans included) haven't performed nor have created music that sounds like the forms AAs have created.
-AAA-

Hockley, TX

#74 Dec 11, 2012
UruEuWauWau wrote:
<quoted text>& what do ya know?! ;-D Ya wanna bet?! ;-) Look, just b/c Yank crakkaz rulin' in the ole Yankland, forcefully colonized western countries after the WWII, especially Europe & most of L.America, it doesn't mean other Afro-diasporan & African groups haven't cre8d equally good works or even better. ;-) W/o Yank whites y'all would still be average 3rd worlders. ;-P & who do ya think Yank IViggers & whites copied in their music?! ;-D Ya really believe Cool & the Gang or Quincy's sound had nuttin' to do w/ BRA?! ;-) Every day non-Yank Afro-diasporan & African music's been sampled & sold on the market all over the world as 'Yank sounds', real talk. ;-D
A lot of hot air, which is expected of you.

http://www.blackwomenofbrazil.com/
the light has come

Danville, IL

#76 Dec 11, 2012
UruEuWauWau wrote:
<quoted text>
Well, I thought it was an interestin' fact,'bout sax, so I simply pointed it out. ;-D But yeah, peeps do that indeed, no worries. ;-)
There is nothing wrong with who invented an instrument whether it is a European or African. It is not what you said but how you say it. Your post have racial overtones and this is why I went on the offensive.

Since: Oct 09

Location hidden

#79 Dec 11, 2012
UruEuWauWau wrote:
<quoted text>
I never said anythin''bout Caribbeans cre8in' blues, now, did I?! ;-D I simply st8d the fact, banjo bein' brought to the ole Yankland from the Caribbean where it was used some 50 yrs before reachin' ole Yankland through Dutch colony on the EC, trashy. ;-)
How is that relevant to this thread? To me it looked like your were trying to imply that Caribbeans started the blues.

Since: Oct 09

Location hidden

#80 Dec 11, 2012
UruEuWauWau wrote:
<quoted text>
Ya got lost in transl8ion as usual, trashy. ;-D I never st8d Caribbeans cre8d Yank blues or had much to do w/ it. However, rap is another story altogether, for sure. ;-) Dun forget, guitar is brought to the ole Yankland by Latin Europeans (Spanish & French, mostly), guitar ain't an Anglo instrument. ;-D
I never once said anything about who brought the guitar here I just think that BM need to get back to playing to because they are sexy when they do.
sorry

Houston, TX

#81 Dec 11, 2012
Copying & pasting a half-a-page essay doesn't legitimize the multiple contradictory claims you've made in the last dozen

rants you've went on. Listen, I don't need some slow brazilian, cross dressing, illegal alien, favela call girl, to give

me instruction on how to properly debate just watch and learn as I pick apart you flawed logic piece by piece. Now, lets

really dissect what we just read here.

1.*You first claimed that it was Caribbean AND South American immigrants.* Well, Which one was it? Or has it slipped your

mind mind like a wet banana already. Well, the LONG article you posted only covers the existence of various early forms in

the Caribbean, which only makes since since the ancestor of the banjo came from African and Africans were shipped their as

well. Any shat for brains could've put two and two together, but thanks anyway for the irrelevant history lesson, but it's

still doesn't confirm that the banjo in north america came via the Caribbean, nor does it even say that. And we know that

significant Caribbean immigration to the east coast of the US didn't happen until the mid 20th century, way after the

first documentation of the banjo appeared in North America, and the abolishment of slavery.

2.*You claim that it was the Dutch who fled from New Holland to New Amsterdam that brought the banjo, banza or whatever

with them to North America* Again no where in that long article on the history of the banjo/banjer does it even begin to

mention anything about Dutch refugees from South America, who btw upon leaving, also left their slaves as maroons, not

bringing them along. So, again you're going to need to get off of your lazy wetback and actually post a source

specifically confirming that it was Caribbeans or South Americans that introduced to the Banjo to North America, not a

history lesson on earlier examples of pluked lute instruments in other british colonies.

Not that it would help in the case of legitimacy if you did as there's already existing eye witness accounts of who the

banjo was played by in North America and were it came from.

"The instrument proper to them is the Banjar, which they brought hither from Africa, and which is the original of the

guitar, its chords being precisely the four lower chords of the guitar."
- Thomas Jefferson
http://oll.libertyfund.org/index.php... -

04_footnote_nt_020
^^^^See, monkey. That's what we called a verbatim source. His accounts from witness that slaves he owned on his plantain

in VIRGINIA(the firs english colony in north america, which is located in the AMERICAN SOUTH) playing an instrument which they brought direct from Africa it self.
sorry

Houston, TX

#82 Dec 11, 2012
Copying & pasting a half-a-page essay doesn't legitimize the multiple contradictory claims you've made in the last dozen rants you've went on. Listen, I don't need some slow brazilian, cross dressing, illegal alien, favela call girl, to give me instructions on how to properly debate just watch and learn as I pick apart you flawed logic piece by piece. Now, lets really dissect what we just read here.

1.*You first claimed that it was Caribbean AND South American immigrants.* Well, Which one was it? Or has it slipped your mind mind like a wet banana already. Well, the LONG article you posted only covers the existence of various early forms in the Caribbean, which only makes since since the ancestor of the banjo came from African and Africans were shipped their as well. Any shat for brains could've put two and two together, but thanks anyway for the irrelevant history lesson, but it's still doesn't confirm that the banjo in north america came via the Caribbean, nor does it even say that. And we know that significant Caribbean immigration to the east coast of the US didn't happen until the mid 20th century, way after the first documentation of the banjo appeared in North America, and the abolishment of slavery.

2.*You claim that it was the Dutch who fled from New Holland to New Amsterdam that brought the banjo, banza or whatever with them to North America* Again no where in that long article on the history of the banjo/banjer does it even begin to mention anything about Dutch refugees from South America, who btw upon leaving, also left their slaves as maroons, not bringing them along. So, again you're going to need to get off of your lazy wetback and actually post a source specifically confirming that it was Caribbeans or South Americans that introduced to the Banjo to North America, not a history lesson on earlier examples of pluked lute instruments in other british colonies. Not that it would help in the case of legitimacy if you did as there's already existing eye witness accounts of who the banjo was played by in North America and were it came from.

"The instrument proper to them is the Banjar, which they brought hither from Africa, and which is the original of the guitar, its chords being precisely the four lower chords of the guitar."
- Thomas Jefferson
http://oll.libertyfund.org/index.php... -

04_footnote_nt_020
^^^^See, monkey. That's what we called a verbatim source. His accounts from witness that slaves he owned on his plantain in VIRGINIA(the firs english colony in north america, which is located in the AMERICAN SOUTH) playing an instrument which they brought direct from Africa it self.
sorry

Houston, TX

#83 Dec 11, 2012
UruEuWauWau wrote:
<quoted text>

In BRA it was known as 'banza' too, & used amongst Afro-BRA 'nations' in various occasions. ;-D As the Dutch Jewish settlers were Xpelled from BRA & Dutch colony destroyed also thx to Afro-BRA peeps, some emigr8d to the Caribbean & Dutch S.American colonies, majority moved back to the Netherlands, & some reached Dutch colony of New Amsterdam (known today as New York). It was there that yo' Yank IVigger ancestors got in contact w/'banjo' for the 1st time, & from there it spread across EC w/ ease, all the way to the ole Yankland's south. All there is to it. ;-D
But, since you seem hell bent on asserting that since a banjo-like instrument from Africa was document first in the Caribbean then it there for must have been brought from the Caribbean to North America, then how do you know that it was not brought to South America via the caribbean too, after all that's where it was first documented. So, allow me to be cheek when I spin your own south american sambo logic back at you, just for some fun.

I say that the banza lute instrument of Brazil was brought from North America when the Confederados from the Southern US when white southerns who served in conferdate army fled the country to that shat hole we know as Brazil and brought along the banjo, which we all know was popular with white southern at the time(and still is to this day).

"Anyways, every year the confederados (descendants of the original Confederates in Brazil) gather to put on the Festa Confederados, which features dancing in antebellum skirts and Confederate soldier uniforms, fried chicken and BBQ, bizarre recordings of Civil War banjo music, prominently displayed Confederate flags and lots of strange stereotypes."
http://www.nodepression.com/profiles/blogs/co...

^^^And look at that I even have a source. So, contrary to what you'd like to believe it was YOU who stole the banjo from US, monkey.
http://www.youtube.com/watch... #!
^^^You can clearly hear from this video that banjo playing in brazil is deeply rooted in Conferderado tradition that they brought with them from the southern United States.

Now, make like a good litte call girl, and go samba off of a bridge for me.
sorry

Houston, TX

#84 Dec 11, 2012
http://oll.libertyfund.org/index.php...

Working link to the Thomas Jefferson quote.

Since: Oct 09

Location hidden

#85 Dec 11, 2012
Well said sorry! Keep the information coming.
Yeah

Houston, TX

#86 Dec 11, 2012
sassyntrashy wrote:
Well said sorry! Keep the information coming.
I have to get ready to head out for the day, but in the mean time, check out this old recording of bluesman Sid Hemphill on the quillz, an instrument brought over by slaves from SE Africa, probably Mozambique.


Check out rhythm and chants in the background.*Priceless*

Since: Oct 09

Location hidden

#87 Dec 11, 2012
Yeah wrote:
<quoted text>
I have to get ready to head out for the day, but in the mean time, check out this old recording of bluesman Sid Hemphill on the quillz, an instrument brought over by slaves from SE Africa, probably Mozambique.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =xAFReuS-wugXX
Check out rhythm and chants in the background.*Priceless*
The drums will always be apart of our music because it is an amazing instrument.
Yeah

Houston, TX

#88 Dec 11, 2012
sassyntrashy wrote:
<quoted text>The drums will always be apart of our music because it is an amazing instrument.
Yeah, we may not have authentic African drums in our culture due to the stono rebellion of Angolan slaves, but our crafty ancestors put to use whatever they could get their hands on like mechanical european drums or even their own body parts. We don't even need drums to hit our rhythms.

You may(if you're from the south) have already heard of a chest & thigh slapping country dance called the pattin da juba or hambone as it's more commonly called.

You want to hear some POLY RHYTHMS, then watch this man's performance.


Then check out this Afr'am woman get it in.
http://www.youtube.com/watch...

Now, compare it to this video of a group of Jola girls in Southern Senegal doing a dance they call "Pat Pat".
http://www.youtube.com/watch...

lol Need I say more? Though I'm sure Ms. Queen Samba Slave extraordinaire will come in here and say that we AAs got it from Caribbeans, South Americans, Chinese, or something. lol sad jealous sap

Wiki article on the Juba dance.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juba_dance

Since: Oct 09

Location hidden

#89 Dec 11, 2012
Yeah wrote:
<quoted text>
Yeah, we may not have authentic African drums in our culture due to the stono rebellion of Angolan slaves, but our crafty ancestors put to use whatever they could get their hands on like mechanical european drums or even their own body parts. We don't even need drums to hit our rhythms.
You may(if you're from the south) have already heard of a chest & thigh slapping country dance called the pattin da juba or hambone as it's more commonly called.
You want to hear some POLY RHYTHMS, then watch this man's performance.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =PLmySQ5CuY0XX
Then check out this Afr'am woman get it in.
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
Now, compare it to this video of a group of Jola girls in Southern Senegal doing a dance they call "Pat Pat".
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
lol Need I say more? Though I'm sure Ms. Queen Samba Slave extraordinaire will come in here and say that we AAs got it from Caribbeans, South Americans, Chinese, or something. lol sad jealous sap
Wiki article on the Juba dance.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juba_dance
Wow this is great stuff to hear. And I barely listen to Uru because Africans Americans make our own stuff. Even though I do give Caribbeans credit for rap music it is not like they created it in the Caribbean all on their own because Americans kids also created their own rap music.
Yeah

Houston, TX

#90 Dec 11, 2012
sassyntrashy wrote:
<quoted text>Wow this is great stuff to hear. And I barely listen to Uru because Africans Americans make our own stuff. Even though I do give Caribbeans credit for rap music it is not like they created it in the Caribbean all on their own because Americans kids also created their own rap music.
Sis, regarding rap music, anybody how has researched will find that all four elements of hip hop have their roots in the American south among African Americans. For instance "Rapping"(talking & rhyming as a form of music, especially over an instrumental), manifest it self in it's most simple form first in a style of music called the Talking Blues. This style was first recorded as published in the 1920s, this then evolved it's self into various forms of music such as jive talking, then disco/funk rhyming. It would be African-American sailors who were Rhythm & blues performers that in the 1960s introduced the records to them, which lead to the creation of Jamaican toasting(which is sometimes falsely credited with being the ultimate root of rap music). But, Talking Blues and Jive Talking music both predated Toasting music. Again that is NOT to minimize the impact that Caribbean DJs and Rhymers had on HipHop as an art form, as they had a HUGE impact, because they did contribute their Toasting style of rhyming and djing which I doubt hip hop would've had it's popularity or longevity without. But as with Pan-Africanism, Huge Influencer =/= Inventor. African Americans were the original inventors. It would be like us trying to claim we originated Reggae music, seeing as it, especially it's beginnings, took HEAVY influences from AA RnB and Blues music, but I would imagine that Jamaicans would be pretty upset if AAs tried to stake that claim on their cultural innovations, like that. It works both ways. It's all love, though.

"Talking blues"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talking_blues

Show me a recorded song of any Jamaicans "rapping"(talking and rhyming over a beat), before this kind of music known as the talking blues.

Speckled Red - The Dirty Dozens

Recorded at the Peabody Hotel Memphis, TN. Sunday, September 22, 1929

^^^Earliest known form of "rap" music to date. It's OUR art form.

Since: Oct 09

Location hidden

#91 Dec 11, 2012
^^Wow Yeah you are on a roll and I am enjoying the education lol.
allthembrothers

Saint Paul, MN

#92 Dec 11, 2012
,,,,,,,,,,

,
,
,
honk always think they got them rock -n- roll lock down,,,,,,
,,,they GOT to block them brothers cuz u know we take them guitar and rock out babi,,,,,,
!!!!!!!!

,,talkin leather pants --- bandana ---- spikes and harleys and sh*,,,,,,,,lats thing them honk want is them brothers on that classic rock tip,,,cuz we wuold TAKE that sh*,,,,

,,,
Leroy

Detroit, MI

#93 Dec 11, 2012
Seriously wrote:
<quoted text>
Smh....So, a drunk fanatical, redneck, finally managed to stumbled his self into this thread.
First of all, where did I say that an AA engineered the electric guitar, dumbass? All of the first rock and roll songs where played with acoustic and bass guitars. And the actual man who invented the electric guitar was inspired by AA musicians who found ways amplify their guitars manually, such as what Elmore James did with his guitar. And the electric guitar was first used by Jazz musicians to amplify their sounds into the big band format and again the first recorder song ever recorded was by Eddie Durham.
But never mind all of that, because apparently to this ignoramous honk, one man engineering an instrument is equivalent to creating a whole new genre of music. Sick to pig wrasslin, dude. That seems more your speed.
Stick to playing basketball, leave the guitar to the superior white players.
Leroy

Detroit, MI

#94 Dec 11, 2012
Seriously wrote:
<quoted text>
You do know you're talking about the staple instrument in music typically enjoyed by whites such as country, folk, and bluegrass right?
Of course you don't. The only thing your kind seems to remember is when the 2 for 1 packs of bud-light go on sale.
The American banjo is a white creation taken from an inferior slave contraption. The inferior slave contraption gave the white man an idea, and he invented a vastly superior instrument, then the white man played it better than any black person ever could.

Anything a black makes (with tools that the white man invented and resources that the white man provides), a white can make ten thousand times better.

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