BM get back 2 the guitar!
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Since: Oct 09

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#1 Dec 9, 2012
I just got finished watching a show called the will and it featured th legendary blues man Robert Johnson. You know the guy who allegedly sold his sold to the devil while inventing rock & roll? Anyways it just reminded me of how sexy BM are when they work that guitar creating real music. I think black music will come back when we go back to where we started. And that means telling the clowns to step away from the turn tables sometimes and use a guitar to create some original music.
-AAA-

Tomball, TX

#2 Dec 9, 2012
What I primarily listen to is pre-1980's Jazz/Jazz-Fusion/Free Jazz, 70s RandB/Soul/Funk, 90s RandB/Hip-Hop and 70s Hard and Progressive Rock.

The only modern(2005+) artist I can listen to is Kanye West.

I seriously don't even entertain the radio; My music collection is stored on my PS3, Laptop and a few CDs.
Paulina

France

#3 Dec 9, 2012
You blacks need to tell those black rappers to sit their asszes down. That sh!t is done played out ya'll.

Since: Oct 09

Location hidden

#4 Dec 9, 2012
-AAA- wrote:
What I primarily listen to is pre-1980's Jazz/Jazz-Fusion/Free Jazz, 70s RandB/Soul/Funk, 90s RandB/Hip-Hop and 70s Hard and Progressive Rock.
The only modern(2005+) artist I can listen to is Kanye West.
I seriously don't even entertain the radio; My music collection is stored on my PS3, Laptop and a few CDs.
Same here I also prefer older music. I am very happy to admit that I can not name one song by the likes of Lil Wayne, Drake, or Nicki Minaj. I don't need to hear their music to know it sucks.

Since: Oct 09

Location hidden

#5 Dec 9, 2012
Paulina wrote:
You blacks need to tell those black rappers to sit their asszes down. That sh!t is done played out ya'll.
Yes we should and they do need to sit down.
Opps

Houston, TX

#6 Dec 9, 2012
Rock and Roll was African-American hipster talk of those who were involved to the swing/ragtime scene in the 40s as a euphemism for sex. It grew almost exclusively out of blues but have influences from jazz, and swing music of Africam Americans in the south. Even the use of the electric slide technique of playing the guitar, which set the foundation of what would become hard rock and heavy metal was an innovation of African American blues artist, such as Sylvester Weaver who was the first recorded arist to use the regular slide technique of using a slide on a string has been traced to one-stringed African instruments[1] similar to a "Diddley bow"(An American instrument of West African orgin that was brought over during the transatlantic slave trade).

The first influential classic electric blues slide guitar artist was Elmore James. Who would work with traveling players coming through like Robert Johnson, Howlin' Wolf and Sonny Boy Williamson. Jazz singer Eddie Durham recorded the first music featuring the actual electric guitar.

Since: Oct 09

Location hidden

#7 Dec 9, 2012
Opps wrote:
Rock and Roll was African-American hipster talk of those who were involved to the swing/ragtime scene in the 40s as a euphemism for sex. It grew almost exclusively out of blues but have influences from jazz, and swing music of Africam Americans in the south. Even the use of the electric slide technique of playing the guitar, which set the foundation of what would become hard rock and heavy metal was an innovation of African American blues artist, such as Sylvester Weaver who was the first recorded arist to use the regular slide technique of using a slide on a string has been traced to one-stringed African instruments[1] similar to a "Diddley bow"(An American instrument of West African orgin that was brought over during the transatlantic slave trade).
The first influential classic electric blues slide guitar artist was Elmore James. Who would work with traveling players coming through like Robert Johnson, Howlin' Wolf and Sonny Boy Williamson. Jazz singer Eddie Durham recorded the first music featuring the actual electric guitar.
Great history lesson and we need more stuff like this to remind our people of how much we did for American culture in the past.

Level 4

Since: Mar 12

Location hidden

#8 Dec 9, 2012
sassyntrashy wrote:
I just got finished watching a show called the will and it featured th legendary blues man Robert Johnson. You know the guy who allegedly sold his sold to the devil while inventing rock & roll? Anyways it just reminded me of how sexy BM are when they work that guitar creating real music. I think black music will come back when we go back to where we started. And that means telling the clowns to step away from the turn tables sometimes and use a guitar to create some original music.
Black guitar players exist! I've been playing guitar for 11 years. I wrote this song about 6 years ago:

Yep

Houston, TX

#9 Dec 9, 2012
sassyntrashy wrote:
<quoted text>Great history lesson and we need more stuff like this to remind our people of how much we did for American culture in the past.
Yep, to expound on the point about the orgins of diddley bow, here's a list of American instruments of African orgin that were brought over via the transatlantic slave trade.

*Banjo*
"The banjo is a four-, five- or six-stringed instrument with a piece of animal skin or plastic stretched over a circular frame. Simpler forms of the instrument were fashioned by Africans in Colonial America, adapted from several African instruments of similar design"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banjo

*Mouth bow*
"In the United States, the musical bow was apparently introduced by African slaves. Today, it is primarily found in the Appalachian Mountains, where it is called a mouthbow or mouth bow."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musical_bow

*Diddley bow*
"The diddley bow is a string instrument of African origin made popular in America, probably developed from instruments found on the Ghana coast of west Africa. There, they were often played by children, one beating the string with sticks and the other changing the pitch by moving a slide up and down. The instrument was then developed as a children's toy by slaves in the United States. They were first documented in the rural South by researchers in the 1930s."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diddley_bow

*The Quills(pan pipes)*
"The Quills are a early American folk panpipe, first noted in the early part of the 19th century among Afro-American slaves in the south. They are aerophones, and fall into the panpipe family. They are assumed to be of African origin, since similar instruments are found in various parts of Africa, and they were first used by 1st and 2nd generation Africans in America."
http://www.sohl.com/Quills/Quills.htm

*Washtub bass*
Ethnomusicologists trace the origins of the instrument to the 'ground harp'- a version that uses a piece of bark or an animal skin stretched over a pit as a resonator. The ang-bindi made by the Baka people of the Congo.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washtub_bass

*Kazoo*
"The kazoo is based on the African mirliton, and was a popular African-American folk instrument during the 1800's. The manufactured kazoo was invented by (an African American named)Alabama Vest."
http://www.kazoos.com/historye.htm

Since: Oct 09

Location hidden

#10 Dec 9, 2012
Half-Diminished wrote:
<quoted text>
Black guitar players exist! I've been playing guitar for 11 years. I wrote this song about 6 years ago:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =CVtMX3WZtvoXX
Ok I will watch this later.
-AAA-

Tomball, TX

#11 Dec 9, 2012
Good thread!

Since: Oct 09

Location hidden

#12 Dec 9, 2012
-AAA- wrote:
Good thread!
Yeah but sadly enough most positive threads about our people die fast. Even the one about Gabby Douglas went quick.
HillBilly bob

Houston, TX

#13 Dec 9, 2012
So, you're telling me that the instrument known as the banjo, that rednecks like me play(poorly btw) during our annual pig wrasslin competitions has it's roots in West Africa among the Jola people?

And here I thought it was a gift from the nascar gods above to all trailer parks across the country.

Level 8

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#14 Dec 9, 2012
it seems like real aa artist have disappeared cuz there's' so much hip-hop out there. not that hip hop isn't real art, it's just a little old now and needs to evolve.
-AAA-

Tomball, TX

#15 Dec 9, 2012
sassyntrashy wrote:
<quoted text>Yeah but sadly enough most positive threads about our people die fast.
We don't "bump" them like we should.
DISASTER LOOMS wrote:
it seems like real aa artist have disappeared
AAs don't focus on them.
Seriously

Houston, TX

#16 Dec 9, 2012
Okay, I had my fun. But, seriously.....

They are just now finding a direct link to West African Jola music played on the Akonting(ancestor to the American banjo) to African-American blues played on the Banjo. Aside from the difference in language of the chants in the background, you can hardly make a discernment between the two.
http://www.downhomeradioshow.com/ShowMp3s2008...

^^^^Hear for yourself.

“100%”

Level 8

Since: Jan 10

Orlando, FL

#17 Dec 9, 2012
Half-Diminished wrote:
<quoted text>
Black guitar players exist! I've been playing guitar for 11 years. I wrote this song about 6 years ago:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =CVtMX3WZtvoXX
WOW!!! This is really GOOD!

“100%”

Level 8

Since: Jan 10

Orlando, FL

#18 Dec 9, 2012
Yep wrote:
<quoted text>
Yep, to expound on the point about the orgins of diddley bow, here's a list of American instruments of African orgin that were brought over via the transatlantic slave trade.
*Banjo*
"The banjo is a four-, five- or six-stringed instrument with a piece of animal skin or plastic stretched over a circular frame. Simpler forms of the instrument were fashioned by Africans in Colonial America, adapted from several African instruments of similar design"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banjo
*Mouth bow*
"In the United States, the musical bow was apparently introduced by African slaves. Today, it is primarily found in the Appalachian Mountains, where it is called a mouthbow or mouth bow."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musical_bow
*Diddley bow*
"The diddley bow is a string instrument of African origin made popular in America, probably developed from instruments found on the Ghana coast of west Africa. There, they were often played by children, one beating the string with sticks and the other changing the pitch by moving a slide up and down. The instrument was then developed as a children's toy by slaves in the United States. They were first documented in the rural South by researchers in the 1930s."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diddley_bow
*The Quills(pan pipes)*
"The Quills are a early American folk panpipe, first noted in the early part of the 19th century among Afro-American slaves in the south. They are aerophones, and fall into the panpipe family. They are assumed to be of African origin, since similar instruments are found in various parts of Africa, and they were first used by 1st and 2nd generation Africans in America."
http://www.sohl.com/Quills/Quills.htm
*Washtub bass*
Ethnomusicologists trace the origins of the instrument to the 'ground harp'- a version that uses a piece of bark or an animal skin stretched over a pit as a resonator. The ang-bindi made by the Baka people of the Congo.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washtub_bass
*Kazoo*
"The kazoo is based on the African mirliton, and was a popular African-American folk instrument during the 1800's. The manufactured kazoo was invented by (an African American named)Alabama Vest."
http://www.kazoos.com/historye.htm
I LOVE The Banjo or any Bass instruments. I'm NOT really familiar with the other ones except maybe the 'Ground harp' but I've probably heard 'em all once. I'm a check em' out!

“100%”

Level 8

Since: Jan 10

Orlando, FL

#19 Dec 9, 2012
I LOVE Bongo drums. This is another African Instrument.
Seriously

Houston, TX

#20 Dec 9, 2012
Redefined wrote:
I LOVE Bongo drums. This is another African Instrument.
Sadly, we African-Americans don't have any of the drums of our ancestors incorporated into our music, due to the the happenings of the stono slave rebellion in which drums of African(specially Angolan and their descedants) were used to communicate with each other to start a slave revolt in South Carolina. After that in 1740 South Carolina colony prohibited slaves “using and keeping drums, horns or other loud instruments"
http://www.croson.net/new_page_33.htm

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