“Freedom”

Level 8

Since: Jan 10

United States

#43 Mar 2, 2013
Modern education mostly teaches us literacy but it has never really taught survival. Our survival has mostly been depended on man & now our literacy is slowly becoming more depended on computers. The future generations will just know enough to do work. The funny thing is The Sumerians stated this was the purpose for Mankind until they were taught knowledge.
ihrVati

Zimbabwe

#44 Mar 2, 2013
What Vince Musewe ( http://www.politicsweb.co.za/ ) is saying about Zimbabwe certainly applies to most African people:
The habit we need to purge is that of greed. It is utterly amazing to see how Zimbabweans in general, have become driven by the greed to acquire, or to be seen to have. This has resulted in corruption, unfair business practice and avoidable personal indebtedness. Corporate greed has become normal while consumers in general are victims of the provision of sub standard services at ridiculous pricing. This involves both public and private goods and services.
At a personal level, we seem to have forgotten our fore fathers' values of delayed gratification, hard work and patience. Because we live for today, we have hugely compromised the potential of our future and as a result Zimbabwe is becoming underdeveloped by the day. We are all active participants in that.
The situation is the same in the cities and other urban settlements; the guys with the pizazz didn’t go far in school but drive the latest and fastest cars and take all the girls. They flaunt their flamboyance for all to see and the highly impressionable youths want to imitate them and know that education has nothing to do with it (NEVANJI MADANHIRE, http://www.thestandard.co.zw .)
ihrVati

Zimbabwe

#45 Mar 2, 2013
BY BERNARD CHIKETO ( http://thinkafricapress.com )

Forgotten pupils

Not all can hope to be as fortunate however. A UNICEF report notes that an 
estimated one million children do not have access to schools or the 
resources to improve their knowledge and skills. Similarly, data from the 
Ministry of Education, Sports, Art and Culture (MoESAC) reveals that between 
2000 and 2008 more than 2 million children and young people failed their 
O-levels or dropped out aged 13.

Catching up

The government has made a few minor attempts to repair the system, including 
revising the policy prohibiting second chance education. Development charity 
Plan International is exploiting this to get children back into school – 
particularly girls who often lose out when families favour the education of 
their brothers. According to Willard Nengomasha, Plan International’s 
Learning Advisor, around 420 girls have so far been taken back to school in 
a pilot programme in the town of Chiredzi.
&#8232 ;A study by MoESAC also led to the implementation of the Performance Lag 
Address Programme (PLAP). This initiative submits pupils to a diagnostic 
examination to establish their “last point of mastery” then helps them catch 
up to where they should be. Singling out English and Mathematics, PLAP 
dedicates time to revisiting the syllabus and targeting concepts that have 
proven persistently difficult for neglected pupils to catch up on.


However, the scheme has been implemented with mixed success. Many secondary 
school timetables are failing to accommodate the programme, which requires 
teachers to go out of their way to work with children. Furthermore, UNICEF 
claims that up to 25% of teachers do not even meet the minimum teaching 
qualifications MoESAC demands.



Prioritising education

PLAP is an ambitious programme which hopes to remedy the problem in just 3 
years – but this may be too little too late for the thousands who have been 
completing (and often failing) O-levels since 2006. Furthermore, the 
programme will not be available to those sitting their national examinations 
in the near future, for fear of interfering with their preparations and 
learning of the syllabi.

 However, if successful, the model could also be extended to non-formal 
training settings and vocational training institutions. In this way, those 
who have missed out could eventually also benefit from the programme.
&#823 2; But perhaps the underlying issue that needs to be overcome is an ingrained 
government mentality which fails to recognise the importance of education. 
MoESAC chief David Coltart has gone on record complaining that the unity 
government has failed to make education a priority, scathingly remarking 
that Zimbabwe’s education crisis was being perpetuated by officials 
“spending three times more money on globetrotting compared to education”. 
For Zimbabwe to build a better future, the government will need to address 
both its current education crisis as well as cultivate longer-term 
appreciation of the importance of education.
ihrVati

Zimbabwe

#46 Mar 2, 2013
Where do these 
 insertions come from?

BY BERNARD CHIKETO ( http://thinkafricapress.com )

Forgotten pupils;
Not all can hope to be as fortunate however. A UNICEF report notes that an estimated one million children do not have access to schools or the resources to improve their knowledge and skills. Similarly, data from the Ministry of Education, Sports, Art and Culture (MoESAC) reveals that between 2000 and 2008 more than 2 million children and young people failed their O-levels or dropped out aged 13.

Catching up
The government has made a few minor attempts to repair the system, including revising the policy prohibiting second chance education. Development charity Plan International is exploiting this to get children back into school – particularly girls who often lose out when families favour the education of their brothers. According to Willard Nengomasha, Plan International’s Learning Advisor, around 420 girls have so far been taken back to school in a pilot programme in the town of Chiredzi. A study by MoESAC also led to the implementation of the Performance Lag Address Programme (PLAP). This initiative submits pupils to a diagnostic examination to establish their “last point of mastery” then helps them catch up to where they should be. Singling out English and Mathematics, PLAP dedicates time to revisiting the syllabus and targeting concepts that have proven persistently difficult for neglected pupils to catch up on.
However, the scheme has been implemented with mixed success. Many secondary school timetables are failing to accommodate the programme, which requires teachers to go out of their way to work with children. Furthermore, UNICEF claims that up to 25% of teachers do not even meet the minimum teaching qualifications MoESAC demands.

Prioritising education
PLAP is an ambitious programme which hopes to remedy the problem in just 3 years – but this may be too little too late for the thousands who have been completing (and often failing) O-levels since 2006. Furthermore, the programme will not be available to those sitting their national examinations in the near future, for fear of interfering with their preparations and learning of the syllabi. However, if successful, the model could also be extended to non-formal training settings and vocational training institutions. In this way, those who have missed out could eventually also benefit from the programme. But perhaps the underlying issue that needs to be overcome is an ingrained government mentality which fails to recognise the importance of education. MoESAC chief David Coltart has gone on record complaining that the unity government has failed to make education a priority, scathingly remarking that Zimbabwe’s education crisis was being perpetuated by officials “spending three times more money on globetrotting compared to education”. For Zimbabwe to build a better future, the government will need to address both its current education crisis as well as cultivate longer-term appreciation of the importance of education.
asho

Eskilstuna, Sweden

#47 Mar 3, 2013
This applies to Africans in particular;

"Modernation through the natural sciences is fine. But through westernizing philosophical sciences, NO!"

"There is a distinction between science and idiology. modernity is made up of two types of sciences, physical and philosophical. The pursuit of material progress and mastery of practical sciences are devine"
ihrVati

Zimbabwe

#48 Mar 3, 2013
BMT wrote:
<quoted text>
We know that river nile snaked up north to arab countries. The book should have said the first european to rich the source of the nile. The nonsense of discovering the source should have been written in british books and not ours. Simple.
You have a point. Africa was terra incognita to the Europeans and there were competitions for being the first to discover the source of so many rivers, not only the Nile. Their books became bestsellers and, of course, some time they brought the books to Africa. Why did no one from South of the Sahara travel North, risk health and life to find the source of Rhine or the Thames and write about in books? Were there no readers?
ihrVati

Zimbabwe

#49 Mar 3, 2013
asho wrote:
This applies to Africans in particular;
"Modernation through the natural sciences is fine. But through westernizing philosophical sciences, NO!"
"There is a distinction between science and idiology. modernity is made up of two types of sciences, physical and philosophical. The pursuit of material progress and mastery of practical sciences are devine"
I have a doctorate in Physics, so could you please enlighten me where I might have been indoctrinated in ideology while attending the Math, Physics, Chemistry lecturers. Ask the politicians how difficult it is to mix science with ideology or political philosophy. On the other hand, science without ethics leads to wars.

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#51 Mar 3, 2013
Two world wars indicates that the whole human race needs different education.1
ZARA

South Africa

#53 Mar 3, 2013
Masud_S_Hoghughi__ wrote:
ebonics and nigonometry?.........
Go back to zoomalia and help your fellow muslim terrorists al Shabaab recapture the islamic zoo from amison.
ihrVati

Zimbabwe

#54 Mar 3, 2013
Now Africa is technically growing again, but everybody knows it is growing from minuscule to slightly larger than minuscule, and that is not much of an achievement. According to the International Energy Agency, in 2010 Afica supplied 5.1% of primary energy and took 5.8% of the total final consumption. This very well reflects the low importance of Africa as a consumer. When talking of electricity, the continent produces only 3.1%, of which more than 50% are generated in South Africa.
School leavers want jobs which the economies of the African countries cannot provide. The productive sector including agriculture cannot grow for lack of electric power. The continent has been graduating thousands of engineers up to PhD level yet most countries need the Chinese contractors to carry out the most simple projects. Where did our training of engineers go wrong?

Level 6

Since: Dec 11

Location hidden

#55 Mar 3, 2013
We need Islam, socialism and stay away from the crackers.

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#56 Mar 3, 2013
Plato's Republic seems like a viable option.
asho

Eskilstuna, Sweden

#57 Mar 3, 2013
ihrVati wrote:
<quoted text>
I have a doctorate in Physics, so could you please enlighten me where I might have been indoctrinated in ideology while attending the Math, Physics, Chemistry lecturers. Ask the politicians how difficult it is to mix science with ideology or political philosophy. On the other hand, science without ethics leads to wars.
The principle of physics, maths and what not, exist in nature for any culture can discover them. They are there waiting to be discovered(Whitey has done most of the work for us. We should the text books and own the sciences. LOL) where as western philosophical sciences are strictly western creation. Africans should not have anything to do with them. They corrupt us. I think the "mess" AA are in is a result of this conflict. They need to be more African to find a pieces of mind IMO.
Peshewar

Jacksonville, FL

#58 Mar 3, 2013
ihrVati wrote:
Now Africa is technically growing again, but everybody knows it is growing from minuscule to slightly larger than minuscule, and that is not much of an achievement. According to the International Energy Agency, in 2010 Afica supplied 5.1% of primary energy and took 5.8% of the total final consumption. This very well reflects the low importance of Africa as a consumer. When talking of electricity, the continent produces only 3.1%, of which more than 50% are generated in South Africa.
School leavers want jobs which the economies of the African countries cannot provide. The productive sector including agriculture cannot grow for lack of electric power. The continent has been graduating thousands of engineers up to PhD level yet most countries need the Chinese contractors to carry out the most simple projects. Where did our training of engineers go wrong?
It's simple ..We think too "top-heavy".The black race as a whole need twice as many tradesmen as professionals .In the more advanced disciplines : Chemistry, Botany,Biology,Medicine,Agricu ltural Science,Mettalurgy should dominate..

Our education should fit the NEEDS of our people.If everybody is a doctor who will build the hospital?If everyone's a chemist who will build the laboratory? You get my drift..We need carpenters,plumbers,electricia ns,pipefitters,millwrights,mec hanics,glaziers,miners,farmers ,brickmasons..

Q.Why does China have to build stadiums and skyscrapers in Africa?

A.Because Black Africa does not pay near enough importance on the skilled trades.

We get off into these stratospheric aspirational goals yet forget the most practical and important of things.No , trades are not as prestigious and respected as the higher disciplines yet they are just as essential.
KIP

San Francisco, CA

#59 Mar 3, 2013
I've always known people from Africa to do quite well academically. One of my roomates in college was from Ethiopia and he is a physics whiz. He even served as a Professor's Assistant he was so good.

People just need to apply themselves to the work.

Level 5

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#62 Mar 4, 2013
ihrVati wrote:
...The productive sector including agriculture cannot grow for lack of electric power.
Do you mean electricity or technology in general?

"The continent has been graduating thousands of engineers up to PhD level yet most countries need the Chinese contractors to carry out the most simple projects. Where did our training of engineers go wrong?"

Perhaps most of these skilled folks have left the continent (brain drain). Africa needs to retain its people...

Level 5

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#63 Mar 4, 2013
Brainiac2 wrote:
Two world wars indicates that the whole human race needs different education.1
Please elaborate...

Level 5

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#64 Mar 4, 2013
KIP wrote:
I've always known people from Africa to do quite well academically. One of my roomates in college was from Ethiopia and he is a physics whiz. He even served as a Professor's Assistant he was so good.
People just need to apply themselves to the work.
They possibly do well, however, does this education help them in solving their problems as they emerge across the continent, e.g., underdevelopment?

Level 5

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#65 Mar 4, 2013
Peshewar wrote:
<quoted text>
...Our education should fit the NEEDS of our people...
I guess this the crux of this thread is: An education adapted to African needs. But again, what are African needs and which education models best attends to such needs...(or am I simply going round in circles with this question!).

Level 5

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#66 Mar 4, 2013
ihrVati wrote:
<quoted text>
I have a doctorate in Physics, so could you please enlighten me where I might have been indoctrinated in ideology while attending the Math, Physics, Chemistry lecturers. Ask the politicians how difficult it is to mix science with ideology or political philosophy. On the other hand, science without ethics leads to wars.
Once again, thank you very much for your valuable and somewhat critical contribution ihrVati.

You mentioned that science without ethics leads to wars, would you like to substantiate in view of African and a model for educating its people?

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

African-American Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
ILLEGAL Mexicans 3 min Hetero-Sapien 165
WHITE english woman only want BLACK MEN (Jul '12) 5 min Loulou 1,721
White murdered is woeful. Black murdered is ce... 6 min Jethro The Coon W... 5
United States of Germany 7 min blkamericamale 3
Hebrew Israelite (Feb '11) 10 min Ben YISRAEL 96,642
Whites' Pathological Desire to put Blacks down 12 min I see triplets 108
The Kardashians aren't just trashy. They're dan... 15 min sillywoman7 49
the moors were black africans not arabs!!! (Jun '08) 54 min Hetero-Sapien 26,402
Why do AA call West Africans Ugly? (Jul '11) 1 hr Hetero-Sapien 376

African-American People Search

Addresses and phone numbers for FREE