Harry Belafonte (a Caribbean) and MLK...
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“Yes WE Can! Yes we Will!”

Level 8

Since: Jul 07

Baltimore, Md.

#719 May 6, 2013
Phoenix wrote:
<quoted text>
How do you propose to aid the oppressed and exploited?
By supporting the Algebra Project, the Prison Abolition Movement, and every progressive struggle aimed at advancing human liberation.
Also, as a teacher. And as a writer I use my pen as well.

And YOU?
sasha

Louisville, KY

#720 May 6, 2013
the blacksmith wrote:
So I was reading about Harry Belafonte today and something that was very interesting to me is how close Harry Belafonte and MLK actually were.
http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lswpbqfNrK1...
http://rilm.files.wordpress.com/2011/01/harry...
http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/...
http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2011/09/04/...
http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2008/12/11/...
http://ic.pics.livejournal.com/humus/758313/3...
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-V2-b8mn-mqg/TxRnNlk...
http://worldclasskids.tripod.com/belafontekin...
http://www.blogcdn.com/www.luxist.com/media/2...
"Harry Belafonte, a supporter of Martin Luther King, Jr., and the civil rights movement, used his celebrity as a beloved entertainer to garner funding for the movement. In her autobiography, Coretta Scott King said of Belafonte, "whenever we got into trouble or when tragedy struck, Harry has always come to our aid, his generous heart wide open" (King, 144-145)."
"In late March 1963, Belafonte invited prominent individuals to a meeting at his New York apartment, where King and Fred Shuttlesworth discussed plans for the Birmingham Campaign and appealed for financial support to be used primarily for bail money. Without hesitation, Belafonte organized a committee to raise funds for the movement. While King was held in a Birmingham jail Belafonte raised $50,000, allowing the campaign to proceed."
http://mlk-kpp01.stanford.edu/index.php/encyc...
It got me thinking about how some posters in here try to push the ideas that Caribbean people had nothing to do with Civil Rights, that there was this huge animosity between Caribbeans and AAs and that they have nothing in common. Then I just bursted out laughing because it is obvious here that Harry Belafonte was MLK's right hand man.
Anyway, just thought I would share.
ok, lol

Level 8

Since: Oct 09

Paris France

#721 May 6, 2013
Savant wrote:
<quoted text>
By supporting the Algebra Project, the Prison Abolition Movement, and every progressive struggle aimed at advancing human liberation.
Also, as a teacher. And as a writer I use my pen as well.
And YOU?
Interesting sir.
i would add simply through your profession.

That being said, can you explain what these 2 movements are : Algebra Project and Prison Abolition Movement ?

a whiteboi

“Yes WE Can! Yes we Will!”

Level 8

Since: Jul 07

Baltimore, Md.

#722 May 6, 2013
attai1 wrote:
<quoted text>
Interesting sir.
i would add simply through your profession.
That being said, can you explain what these 2 movements are : Algebra Project and Prison Abolition Movement ?
a whiteboi
I'm increasingly leaning toward the persuasion that prisons must be abolished, not reformed. Some of the reasons, which are too many to develop here, are argued pretty well by Angela Davis in her slender voluee called ARE PRISONS OBSOLETE?
If you check out some of her works in Amazon or even some of her talks on YouTube, she talks about that quite a bit.

Level 8

Since: Oct 09

Paris France

#723 May 6, 2013
Savant wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm increasingly leaning toward the persuasion that prisons must be abolished, not reformed. Some of the reasons, which are too many to develop here, are argued pretty well by Angela Davis in her slender voluee called ARE PRISONS OBSOLETE?
If you check out some of her works in Amazon or even some of her talks on YouTube, she talks about that quite a bit.
Sir,

complete suppression is probably difficult with extremely violent convicts.
But downsizing them is certainly a necessity : alternative types of penal sanctions could be developed much more than it is now.

We've reached a record in France too after the Sarkozy regime in terms of people behind bars though it is far less in proportion than in the USA. Mrs Taubira would like precisely to deflate this number and push for alternative sentences.
But Sarkozy has nurtured a feeling of insecurity among the public so this sensible policy is not favored in the media and our Prez much too tepid.

a whiteboi

“Yes WE Can! Yes we Will!”

Level 8

Since: Jul 07

Baltimore, Md.

#724 May 6, 2013
attai1 wrote:
<quoted text>
Sir,
complete suppression is probably difficult with extremely violent convicts.
But downsizing them is certainly a necessity : alternative types of penal sanctions could be developed much more than it is now.
We've reached a record in France too after the Sarkozy regime in terms of people behind bars though it is far less in proportion than in the USA. Mrs Taubira would like precisely to deflate this number and push for alternative sentences.
But Sarkozy has nurtured a feeling of insecurity among the public so this sensible policy is not favored in the media and our Prez much too tepid.
a whiteboi
Well there is a growing prison abolition movement in America, but it's not yet a majority idea. Once it was not even a movement. Even most revolutionaries couldn't imagine it. But the growth of the prison industrial complex (which seems to work hand in hand with de-industrialiization and teh expansion of global capitalism) has gotten many to wonder whetheer the system isn't beyond repair, whether like feudal fiefdoms, prisons are simply an obsolete form of social control.
When Angela Davis, Huey P. Newton and others were imprisoned in the late 60s and early 70s, there were only 200,00 inmatees. Now there are over 2 MILLIONS. American imprisons more of her own citizens (including children) than does any other nation on earth. It must stop.
Bob Moses, former leader of SNCC during the Mississippi Freedom Summer of 1964, started the Algebra Project among inner city youths, both to enhance their skills, and to help form them into a community that would fight for the right to quality education. Some of these Algebra Project youths, who are mainly from poor inner city Black (sometimes Latin) communities have become active in other areas--including th Occupy Movement a year ago. A part of what they're advocating is QUALITY education as a CONSTITUTIONAL right. Believe it or not, no such right exist in America--at least not on a Constitutional level.

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