Unique2

Forsyth, GA

#408 Nov 20, 2012
DISASTER LOOMS wrote:
<quoted text>
i don't think you've ever been to the EC. according to the 2010 over half of the black population in boston was born in the caribbean. if you include 1st gens, and africans, and illegals, afro-latinos, the non-traditional black population is far larger than the traditional historical aa community.
nyc/metro has by far the largest black population of any metro area in the country. and this is mostly due to immigration. blacks in philly became the majority for the 1st time in the 2010 census, cuz of immigration.
while caribbean immigration has slowed recently, african immigration continues to climb. and the EC is also the preferred destination for afro-latinos.
true most black americans are in the south, but those margins are reduced every year. the growth rate of the black population on the EC is much higher than the south. and it's not all bout size. the educational level is much better, too.
Son I've been to the east coast, in fact I live on the east coast. Georgia is about as close as you can get to the Atlantic Ocean.
Unique2

Forsyth, GA

#409 Nov 20, 2012
For anyone interested in African-American history Memphis, Tennesse; Charleston, South Carolina; Atlanta, Georgia; Birmingham, Alabama; Savannah, Georgia; and Greensboro, North Carolina are places steeped in Black American traditions and they all offer extensive black history tours.

“Formerly King_spade”

Level 5

Since: Jan 11

Toronto

#410 Nov 20, 2012
sassyntrashy wrote:
<quoted text>How many times must I say that I like Caribbeans people. I give them their credit for creating rap music but I would not say they created the whole hip hop culture that now dominates american youths. And one of my favorite rappers is the notorious big.
I'm not talking about you liking Caribbeans right now. I'm talking about you claiming that Caribbeans were not a part of the hip hip culture, only a part of rap music. Several hip hop documentaries have proven the opposite. In fact, not only were Caribbean blacks a part of hip hop culture, so were Puerto Ricans. AAs, Caribbeans and Puerto Ricans were all in the Bronx and all were part of the development of hip hop culture. Again, watch some hip hop documentaries and you'll see that the CULTURE of hip hop came from all of these influences. The mainstream stuff you see today is really pop music that imitates rap music and hip hop culture.

Unique2

Forsyth, GA

#411 Nov 20, 2012
Here's a documentary on Medgar Evers.

Medgar Evers-Part 1, Civil Rights Heros



Medgar Evers- Part 2, Civil Rights Heros

http://www.youtube.com/watch...
Unique2

Forsyth, GA

#412 Nov 20, 2012
It's amazing how African-Americans were treated like second-class citizens for centuries, but never gave up on their country. We didn't given up on America and migrated to someone elses country the way so many sorry a$$ immigrants have. Even with the threat of death our leaders pressed on.

Level 8

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#413 Nov 20, 2012
Unique2 wrote:
<quoted text>
Son I've been to the east coast, in fact I live on the east coast. Georgia is about as close as you can get to the Atlantic Ocean.
you don't even know what 'east coast' means. the EC is everywhere from new england to the d.c./baltimore/virginia metro area. georgia is on the eastern seaboard, it's not part of the EC.

Level 8

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#414 Nov 20, 2012
Unique2 wrote:
<quoted text>
The ancestry of a person's marriage partner does matter to the persons family. Most people would prefer their son or daughter marry someone of their own ethnic group. You have a lot to learn.
it might be important to some people. what i can tell you is that it's not important, here. afro-latinos have the highest rate of 'ir' marriage in the country. it's even higher than asian women. and the vast majority of those marriages are with aa.
and caribbeans have been integrating and assimilating into the aa community on the EC for a hundred years.

Since: Oct 09

Location hidden

#415 Nov 20, 2012
the blacksmith wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm not talking about you liking Caribbeans right now. I'm talking about you claiming that Caribbeans were not a part of the hip hip culture, only a part of rap music. Several hip hop documentaries have proven the opposite. In fact, not only were Caribbean blacks a part of hip hop culture, so were Puerto Ricans. AAs, Caribbeans and Puerto Ricans were all in the Bronx and all were part of the development of hip hop culture. Again, watch some hip hop documentaries and you'll see that the CULTURE of hip hop came from all of these influences. The mainstream stuff you see today is really pop music that imitates rap music and hip hop culture.
I do not need a documentary to tell me where hip hop culture came from.

Level 8

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#416 Nov 20, 2012
the blacksmith wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm not talking about you liking Caribbeans right now. I'm talking about you claiming that Caribbeans were not a part of the hip hip culture, only a part of rap music. Several hip hop documentaries have proven the opposite. In fact, not only were Caribbean blacks a part of hip hop culture, so were Puerto Ricans. AAs, Caribbeans and Puerto Ricans were all in the Bronx and all were part of the development of hip hop culture. Again, watch some hip hop documentaries and you'll see that the CULTURE of hip hop came from all of these influences. The mainstream stuff you see today is really pop music that imitates rap music and hip hop culture.
caribbean americans. the caribbeans who helped develop rap and hip-hop were thoroughly assimilated.
ashanti king

Lansdowne, PA

#417 Nov 20, 2012
sassyntrashy wrote:
<quoted text>What's wrong with coming from money? Now that you mentio it I know it woud be so beautiful if we had more black families who came from money who were willing to look out for other blacks. You can not be serious.
Nothing wrong with that but since 98% of the citizens in the United States are not born rich, I will rather admired someone who had nothing but made something out of themselves and let's not forget after obama made it, he did not closed the door on the people that he left behind. He could have made a lot of money after he graduated from school but he decided to become a community organizer. Mitt romney has proven time and time again that he don't care about half of the country, even republicans are bashing him.

“Formerly King_spade”

Level 5

Since: Jan 11

Toronto

#418 Nov 20, 2012
DISASTER LOOMS wrote:
<quoted text>
caribbean americans. the caribbeans who helped develop rap and hip-hop were thoroughly assimilated.
That does not change the Caribbean influence they brought to hip hop. We've had this discussion before. Not every Caribbean that lives in the U.S. throws away everything Caribbean about themselves. If you need proof of that, just go to Flatbush area in Brooklyn.

“Formerly King_spade”

Level 5

Since: Jan 11

Toronto

#419 Nov 20, 2012
sassyntrashy wrote:
<quoted text>I do not need a documentary to tell me where hip hop culture came from.
Yes, you rather just invent the story in your head. Just like you invented the story of Harry being a leech instead of following what history says which shows that he is a genuine civil rights activist. It makes it easier to try to claim that AAs are the most important black group when you do this so I understand.
Unique2

Macon, GA

#420 Nov 20, 2012
DISASTER LOOMS wrote:
<quoted text>
you don't even know what 'east coast' means. the EC is everywhere from new england to the d.c./baltimore/virginia metro area. georgia is on the eastern seaboard, it's not part of the EC.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Coast_of_th...
Unique2

Macon, GA

#421 Nov 20, 2012
DISASTER LOOMS wrote:
<quoted text>
it might be important to some people. what i can tell you is that it's not important, here. afro-latinos have the highest rate of 'ir' marriage in the country. it's even higher than asian women. and the vast majority of those marriages are with aa.
and caribbeans have been integrating and assimilating into the aa community on the EC for a hundred years.
That isn't true.

Level 8

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#422 Nov 20, 2012
the blacksmith wrote:
<quoted text>
That does not change the Caribbean influence they brought to hip hop. We've had this discussion before. Not every Caribbean that lives in the U.S. throws away everything Caribbean about themselves. If you need proof of that, just go to Flatbush area in Brooklyn.
those are all recent arrivals. the great influx of caribbeans happened between 1980 and 2000. this generation of caribbean americans are a lot more likely to maintain their caribbean identity. cuz whole neighborhoods can be 80% caribbean and they a lot closer to their caribbean roots as new comers.

caribbeans who migrated in the 50s 60s and early 70s completely assiminated. they were caught up in the black consciousness and political activism of aa, and they really didn't have the numbers to build their own culturally unique communities like they do, today.

i don't think the caribbean american pioneers of hip hop imported anything from the caribbean and fused it into funk and r&b. all the documentaries i've seen suggest that rap/hiphop was 100% organic.

sure caribbeans were major players, but they were culturally, aa. anyone who's dj'ing at aa block parties in the 70s, is assimilated.
Unique2

Macon, GA

#423 Nov 20, 2012
the blacksmith wrote:
<quoted text>
That does not change the Caribbean influence they brought to hip hop. We've had this discussion before. Not every Caribbean that lives in the U.S. throws away everything Caribbean about themselves. If you need proof of that, just go to Flatbush area in Brooklyn.
Why are African-Americans better athletes than other blacks? Why are African-Americans better singers than other blacks? Why are African-Americans better dancers than other blacks? Why are African-Americans better entertainers than other blacks? Why have African-Americans made more contributions to the fields of science and technology than other blacks? Why have the world's black movers and shakers overwelmingly had a Black American bloodline?

And do you think it's fair to catagorize Black Americans as equals with other blacks since they've achieved more(far more) under near impossible circumstances?(jim crow, segregation, the slave mentality, lynchings, having a minority status in a racist white society etc.

Level 8

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#424 Nov 20, 2012
Unique2 wrote:
not the east coast of the united states. i'm talk'n bout the colloquial term 'east coast'- which is from boston/metro to d.c./metro.

“Formerly King_spade”

Level 5

Since: Jan 11

Toronto

#425 Nov 20, 2012
DISASTER LOOMS wrote:
<quoted text>
those are all recent arrivals. the great influx of caribbeans happened between 1980 and 2000. this generation of caribbean americans are a lot more likely to maintain their caribbean identity. cuz whole neighborhoods can be 80% caribbean and they a lot closer to their caribbean roots as new comers.
caribbeans who migrated in the 50s 60s and early 70s completely assiminated. they were caught up in the black consciousness and political activism of aa, and they really didn't have the numbers to build their own culturally unique communities like they do, today.
i don't think the caribbean american pioneers of hip hop imported anything from the caribbean and fused it into funk and r&b. all the documentaries i've seen suggest that rap/hiphop was 100% organic.
sure caribbeans were major players, but they were culturally, aa. anyone who's dj'ing at aa block parties in the 70s, is assimilated.
Look up toasting and the development of dancehall reggae music in Jamaica. It has been documented.

Level 8

Since: May 10

Location hidden

#426 Nov 20, 2012
Unique2 wrote:
<quoted text>
That isn't true.
what isn't true? listen sistah, you have no idea what goes on in the world outside of your small southern town.
Unique2

Macon, GA

#427 Nov 20, 2012
There's evidence that older DJs in Brooklyn and Queens were developing turntable techniques(including break beats) before Kool Herc in the Bronx. Guys like Grandmaster Flowers, the Disco Twins and the Smith Brothers. In fact there's recently been a documentary dedicated to the subject entitled "Founding Fathers: The Untold Story of Hip-Hop".



Hip-Hop as a music genre was born when The Sugar Hill Gang released "Rappers Delight". It was conceived by jazz-poetry and slaves who rhymed on plantation fields(signifying). And it's godfathers include the Last Poets, James Brown and Rudy Ray Moore.

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