Strong BM revenge kills LAPD!!
Stag_R_Lee

Scottsdale, AZ

#652 Feb 13, 2013
KIP wrote:
<quoted text>
The point I'm making is that true strength doesn't come from blaming white people all the time. it comes from recognizing our own stake in something. Understanding failures of the past and not repeating them is important. You cannot perfect something if you don't correct it. Today, many black people don't correct, or are not willing to correct what is wrong. Passing blame all the time is old. That just makes it easy for some to set back and do nothing.
I recall living in San Francisco's Fillmore district some years back. The Fillmore used to be a thriving black community and jazz mecca before gentrification and the city's decision in the 1960's to tear down much of the area. Today, there are still blacks there, but you might be hard pressed to find a brother willing to pick up a paint brush and go over a building. One day some guy saw a group of Mexican laborers doing the work and he went after them with a bullhorn. He didn't own the building, but he saw this as an affront on the community.
All of this talk about community and the past doesn't mean anything when men are not even willing to improve what they already have.
Do you know what happened to the "Silver Dollar" bar. I went looking for it about five years ago. No luck! It was an unbelievable bar. I know the owner got rich simply by selling off the silver dollars. LOL

By the way, how do you explain the fact that Fillmore was a thriving Black community prior to gentrification?:)
Stag_R_Lee

Scottsdale, AZ

#653 Feb 13, 2013
“The evil that men do lives after them;
The good is oft interred with their bones.”

&#8213; William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar

...so let it be with Desmond.
Segregation

Philadelphia, PA

#654 Feb 13, 2013
RIP Dorner..

We with you spiritually.
Wished you took more White Psychopaths with you..

Lunarblitz

“There's enough for everyone”

Level 7

Since: Mar 07

USA

#656 Feb 13, 2013
Segregation wrote:
RIP Dorner..
We with you spiritually.
Wished you took more White Psychopaths with you..
He's going to rest in hell right where he belongs:)

It's always a good day to see a criminal made good.

Level 8

Since: Jan 10

Location hidden

#657 Feb 13, 2013
Matthew_1 wrote:
<quoted text>
Great post Capree glad to see sensible posts like yours.
Thanks Matthew_1!

“I'm a proud grandma”

Level 7

Since: Feb 12

Location hidden

#659 Feb 13, 2013
The police got so embarrassed at the news conference they had to cut it short. They had a real hard time explaining why they didn't search the cabins, and people living in the cabins near the one where Dorner was allegedly found, said no cops came and knocked on their doors.

A real bad mark for law enforcement when they do a shoddy investigation, and then have to hide from reporters out of shame.
Black Negreaux

Houston, TX

#661 Feb 13, 2013
Segregation wrote:
RIP Dorner..
We with you spiritually.
Wished you took more White Psychopaths with you..
Well, at least the good thing is that there is one less Black Psychopath to deal with.
aisling-

Port Clinton, OH

#662 Feb 13, 2013
Yep, that racist old LAPD who had 2 Black Police Chiefs in the past 15 years.

Perhaps it would serve some people well to remember...

"Law Enforcement: Sworn to Protect and Serve. Not kiss your a**."
aisling-

Port Clinton, OH

#663 Feb 13, 2013
*that had, even.

Level 8

Since: May 08

Pacific Northwest

#664 Feb 13, 2013
Ms Mack wrote:
The police got so embarrassed at the news conference they had to cut it short. They had a real hard time explaining why they didn't search the cabins, and people living in the cabins near the one where Dorner was allegedly found, said no cops came and knocked on their doors.

A real bad mark for law enforcement when they do a shoddy investigation, and then have to hide from reporters out of shame.
Interesting detail, Ms Mack. Thanks for that. I don't watch TV so I missed that little nugget.

Sloppy and goofy, non-professional cops - once again.
aisling-

Port Clinton, OH

#665 Feb 13, 2013
"However, 1992 was a watershed year for the Los Angeles Police Department, and for the Chief. The verdict in the Rodney King trial, which acquitted four LAPD officers, and the subsequent April rioting were flash points that placed the Department under a microscope of public scrutiny. National debates about race relations in America, the disintegration of urban America, and the role of police in these issues continued for months. No other agency withstood so much public examination, as did the LAPD in 1992. In the midst of this community trial, the Los Angeles Police Department experienced a change in Police Chiefs. With the retirement of Chief Gates, Chief Willie L. Williams took the helm in June of 1992. Chief Williams was the 50th Chief of Police and the first African-American and the first Chief from outside the Department to assume command in more than four decades. With Chief Williams came a grant of $607,000 from the Department of Justice to make changes within the Department. These changes included rebuilding the patrol force, rejuvenating the Basic Car Plan, and restoring the public confidence in the police department."
aisling-

Port Clinton, OH

#666 Feb 13, 2013
Another Black Police Chief, imagine that:

"On August 22, 1997, Deputy Chief Bernard C. Parks was officially sworn in as the 52nd Chief of Police of the Los Angeles Police Department before an estimated crowd of 3,000 in ceremonies at the Los Angeles Police Academy. The Chief was joined at the change of command ceremony by Mayor Richard Riordan, the Board of Police Commissioners and other city, state, and national dignitaries.

Chief Parks’ career has been one marked by a commitment to protect and serve the Los Angeles community, a commitment he has undertaken with integrity and boundless enthusiasm. He is a man of vision for the future of the Department and is dedicated to making the City of the Angels a safe and crime free place in which to work and play.

Since his appointment by the Board of Police Commissioners, Chief Parks has begun to make his mark on the organization. One of his first actions was a reorganization of the Department, designed to flatten the hierarchical chain of command and to consolidate similar or related functions. He also initiated FASTRAC, an acronym for Focus, Accountability, Strategy, Teamwork, Response and Coordination. This program is a process for full command accountability in every aspect of leadership in the Department. FASTRAC denotes Chief Parks’ forward movement to what he refers to as the "new" LAPD.

His plans for 1998 and the future will ultimately change the LAPD to bring improved quality police service to all the residents of Los Angeles and a leaner, more organized Department to be consistent with his vision for institutionalizing Community Policing."
aisling-

Port Clinton, OH

#667 Feb 13, 2013
"In May 2002, Chief Martin H. Pomeroy was selected as the Los Angeles Police Department’s Temporary Chief of Police. Throughout his career, he held community policing, problem solving and quality of life issues as priorities in his approach to law enforcement. He demonstrated a strong track record of establishing goals and executing strategies to achieve enhanced service to the community. He moved through the ranks of leadership, achieving the rank of Deputy Chief in 1993, and served the Department at that rank until his retirement in December 2000. Martin H. Pomeroy served as Chief of Police of the LAPD from May 7, 2002 until October 26, 2002.

Chief William J. Bratton was appointed Chief of the Los Angeles Police Department on October 28, 2002. Chief Bratton oversees the third largest police department in the United States, managing 9,300 sworn officers, 3,000 civilian employees, and an annual budget of more than one billion dollars. A strong community policing advocate, he is directing a major reengineering of the LAPD, decentralizing the bureaucracy, strengthening local commands, increasing responsiveness to community concerns, and developing strategies to counter gang-related crimes and the threat of terrorism. During his first three years as Chief in Los Angeles, the LAPD has driven Part I crime down 26.4 percent, including a 25.5 percent reduction in homicide. The Department has also developed one of the most comprehensive and effective counter-terrorism operations in the country.

The only person ever to serve as chief executive of both the LAPD and the NYPD, Chief Bratton established an international reputation for re-engineering police departments and fighting crime in the 1990s. As Chief of the New York City Transit Police, Boston Police Commissioner, then New York City Police Commissioner, he revitalized morale and cut crime in all three posts, achieving the largest crime declines in New York City’s history. He led the development of COMPSTAT, the internationally acclaimed command accountability metric system that uses computer-mapping technology and timely crime analysis to target emerging crime patterns and coordinate police response. From 1996 on, Chief Bratton worked in the private sector, where he formed his own private consulting company, The Bratton Group, L.L.C., working on four continents, including extensive consulting in South America. He also consulted with the Kroll Associates monitoring team overseeing the implementation of the Federal Consent Decree with the LAPD.

A U.S. Army Vietnam veteran, Chief Bratton began his policing career in 1970, as a police officer with the Boston Police Department, rising to Superintendent of Police, the department’s highest sworn rank, in just ten years. In the 1980s, Chief Bratton headed two other police agencies, the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority Police and the Massachusetts Metropolitan District Commission Police.

Chief Bratton holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Law Enforcement from Boston State College/University of Massachusetts. He is a graduate of the FBI National Executive Institute and was a Senior Executive Fellow at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He currently serves as the elected President of the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF). He is a frequent lecturer, writer, and commentator. His critically acclaimed autobiography, Turnaround, was published by Random House in 1998. Among his many honors and awards, Chief Bratton holds the Schroeder Brothers Medal, the Boston Police Department’s highest award for valor. Chief Bratton is married to Attorney Rikki Klieman and has one grown son, David Bratton."
aisling-

Port Clinton, OH

#669 Feb 13, 2013
"Chief Charlie Beck was appointed Chief of the Los Angeles Police Department in November 2009. Chief Beck oversees the third largest police department in the United States, managing 10,000 sworn officers and 3,000 civilian employees, encompassing an area of 473 square miles, a population of approximately 3.8 million people, and an annual budget that exceeds one billion dollars. Having facilitated his predecessor's successful reengineering and reform effort, Chief Beck continues to evolve and refine those strategies to further the Department's ascendancy to the pinnacle of 21st Century Policing. Major components of this endeavor include the mitigation of crime, the reduction of gang violence, the containment of terrorism, and the continuation of the reforms that brought the Department into compliance with the Consent Decree.

As an officer, Chief Beck's patrol assignments have included Rampart, Southeast, Pacific and Hollywood Areas. As a sergeant, his assignments included Harbor and Southwest Patrol, South Bureau C.R.A.S.H. and Internal Affairs Division. Upon being promoted to captain, he was initially assigned to Southeast Division followed by terms as the Commanding Officer of Juvenile Division, Central Area and finally Rampart Area. As a Commander, he was the Assistant to the Director, Office of Operations. Upon his promotion to Deputy Chief, he assumed command of Operations-South Bureau. Chief Beck went on to become Chief of Detectives, where he implemented innovative, far ranging and visionary changes to the Detective Bureau.

Chief Beck is renowned for his ability to forge traditional policing methods, community outreach programs, tempered with the input of diverse stakeholders to form enduring crime abatement programs. During Chief Beck's tenure as Central Area's Commanding Officer he formulated the original Safer Cities Initiative. This program brought together a coalition of City Department, Council Offices, homeless advocacy groups, and service providers to provide shelter and mitigate crime perpetrated against the homeless. This phalanx of governmental and private agencies became a model of efficiency and has been replicated nationally.

Chief Beck was also charged with reforming the beleaguered Rampart Area in the aftermath of the Rafael Perez scandal. Chief Beck utilized inspirational leadership fostering change from the roots of Department and up, ensuring all changes are evolutionary and withstand the test of time. Effecting change from the bottom to the top of the chain of command ensures a long lasting institutional change. Chief Beck also built community and racial harmony through the elusive goal of transparency and effective constitutional policing. The techniques Chief Beck employed are well-documented in the Blue Ribbon Rampart Review Panel's report to the Police Commission entitled, Rampart Reconsidered: the Search for Real Reform Seven Years Later. The Panel reviewed the lessons learned and missed in the aftermath of the Rampart crisis and recommended that the department follow the community policing leadership model used by Chief Beck and his team in his successful turnaround of the Rampart Area."
aisling-

Port Clinton, OH

#670 Feb 13, 2013
10,000 Sworn Police Officers serving w/the LAPD and in Dorner's very limited experience, he knows all about what each and every one of them does. And people swallow his accusations like a ham sandwich.

Level 3

Since: Oct 10

Location hidden

#671 Feb 13, 2013
aisling- wrote:
10,000 Sworn Police Officers serving w/the LAPD and in Dorner's very limited experience, he knows all about what each and every one of them does. And people swallow his accusations like a ham sandwich.
That's because of the LAPD's history. Not to mention there has been other black officers that have come forward in the past and have been terminated. As long as we continue to pretend there isn't a problem, and it's just blacks using racism to get over on the system, then we will continue to have these problems. And we're gonna have more violent episodes like we just witnessed.
aisling-

Port Clinton, OH

#672 Feb 13, 2013
Segregation wrote:
RIP Dorner..
We with you spiritually.
Wished you took more White Psychopaths with you..
Yep, he's resting in peace alright as he's rotting in h*ll after having been flame broiled.

Winning!
Black momma

Temecula, CA

#673 Feb 13, 2013
Transition black it is like a step program
1You are from non violence generation MLK they want there kids to fit in so they want you to fit in like white people don't make waves you be the better ask God to see you through
2 Ok now you go to school you are hip to Gil Scott herion and all the uprising will happen. Big Afros parents are so happy you are on your way
3 You get your degree because you don't want that GHETTO mentality so who determines that
ok I am there almost I will ignore all the down trotten Negros and colored and then you get that wake up call tap tap
4 Now we try to sell kids this bill of goods then the self hate starts all over again or you have to explain why we still celebrate July 4th Christopher Columbus day, Presidents day so
why black people are we mad because we are in a Country that honors these ok let's have
NAT TURNER DAY why not
Pure

Washington, DC

#674 Feb 13, 2013
This man witness a civilian like any of us being abused while detained. That's what this whole thing is about.

His superior was involved and he spoke up to protect a civilian.

That civilian was so badly beaten he was incapable of speaking on his own behalf. Dorner was later charged with filing a fasle report against his superior. They presumeably found his report to be false sense the only witness to this abuse was the victim himself.

This man that some blacks are clearly terrified of supporting, actually found a lot of support after police ambushed two civilian women driving trucks, an shot first and asked questions last.

I came back here just to read the types of replies, some like capree and SBW might have.

Yes. He was wrong for killing that couple as they were defensless. I think had he kept his fight with those officers capable of fighting bak things might have been different.

But that has little to do with why some are on the side of those police officers. Even whites have come out and demanded the LAPD be investigated. The LA Times took heat for possibly smearing the facts to prevent public sympathy for this man.

It's a damn shame when his closest allies throughout this might have actually been white civilians instead of his own race imo. We should have been the ones demanding the facts come out on the case against his superior. That's where this all began. But many of our race are so corrupted, twisted plain old scared that we can't come together for even the truth. Gutless.

Capree I read what you said. You are the lowest thing crawling on this Earth.
aisling-

Port Clinton, OH

#675 Feb 14, 2013
ladondaruler1 wrote:
<quoted text> That's because of the LAPD's history. Not to mention there has been other black officers that have come forward in the past and have been terminated. As long as we continue to pretend there isn't a problem, and it's just blacks using racism to get over on the system, then we will continue to have these problems. And we're gonna have more violent episodes like we just witnessed.
However, those Officers who had been terminated didn't go on the rampage and killing innocent people. Dorner was bad news and he had a pattern of behavior. It's been reported that he beat up a person and I believe he had been kicked off of the football team. Due to what's coming out about him, there have been more than one Police Officers who have stated that they don't know how he even passed the psych evaluation. He had a problem with anger/control issues and that is not someone you want serving as a Police Officer. It was only a matter of time. If it wasn't him being terminated, something else would have set him off.

As I've stated before, all he had to do is touch on racism and due to the past history w/the LAPD, old wounds would be opened up and he knew that. Dorner wasn't a saint or any martyr. He was a cold blooded murderer and in light of everything that transpired, his field training officer was right about him and if you ask me, she was doing her job in that she saw a problem.

Racism very well may be a problem but it in no way, imo, had anything to do with him being terminated. He made false statements and sat on what he said was witnessing misconduct for 2 weeks and then asked his superior to promise not to say anything. That's covering something up if indeed there was misconduct. If I were sitting on that board that ruled on the case and whether it was true or not re the misconduct, I rule to terminate him as well if he sat on something for two weeks or asked a superior to promise not to do anything. That shows a lack of poor judgement and down the road could present a major risk. Not to mention if he did that later down the line, who knows what kind of legal action could be taken against the LAPD because he wasn't forthcoming and submitted an arrest report like he did and then later says that he witnessed misconduct on the part of another Officer.

All I have to say is good riddance to that POS.

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