Images of Slavery
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Frank

Clarkston, MI

#1 May 29, 2012
This is a picture of slaves being auctioned off to their slave owners.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/abolitio...

This image truly shows the horrible treatment of African Women Slaves in the South. The first thing to notice in this picture is the daughter holding on to her mother. Just like Stephanie Li talked about in the article above, women who had children didn’t always get to take care of their children. Most of the time, the women were separated from their children, because they would be sold to different families, and possibly never see each other again. The woman on the ground holding the infant is probably next in line to be sold off as well. This woman more than likely would not be taken away from her child, just because the child still needs to be tended to.

The second thing to notice is the African man in the background being beaten by his master. This man is probably the husband of the woman being sold and knows they are about to never see each other again. So in desperation to fight back, he probably is being beaten for his actions. This is very typical of how slaves were treated by their masters as well. Anytime the slaves acted out in anyway, they were punished, and the most popular form of punishment was to be beaten.

Another thing to notice is all of the White Men standing around the auction block. One of the men even has a whip in his hand. The whip resembles, again, the harsh punishment all slaves endured. Also the way the men are looking at the woman, looks to me like they are looking at her as if she is just a piece of meat. This type of behavior shown by the masters, eventually normally lead to sexual harassment.

Frank

Clarkston, MI

#2 May 29, 2012
William Blake,‘Group of Negroes, as imported to be sold for slaves:

http://media.vam.ac.uk/vamembed/media/version...
Frank

Clarkston, MI

#3 May 29, 2012
Frank

Clarkston, MI

#4 May 29, 2012
The Interesting Narrative of The Life of Olaudah Equiano

Black child enslaved

http://i.ytimg.com/vi/aztipRPa1Yw/0.jpg

http://wn.com/The_Interesting_Narrative_of_th...
Frank

Clarkston, MI

#5 May 29, 2012
For more than 200 years Britain was at the heart of a lucrative transatlantic trade in millions of enslaved Africans.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/images/i...
Frank

Clarkston, MI

#6 May 29, 2012
SLAVE KIDNAPPERS!

Typical Poster Printed by Abolitionists in the Early 1850s:

http://marksrichardson.files.wordpress.com/20...
Frank

Clarkston, MI

#7 May 29, 2012
The Brookes - visualising the transatlantic slave trade

The appearance of the abolitionist poster the Brookes in various museum displays and exhibitions in a multitude of forms throughout the bicentenary has affirmed the prominent place this eighteenth century image still possess over contemporary society. For many the horror and inhumanity of the slave trade is distilled with this image. It appears capable of evoking great emotion amongst its viewers and has become alongside the Wedgwood seal the most recognisable piece of the campaign materials of the abolitionists. Like the Wedgwood seal its appearance has also been contested this year. Its use has been strongly criticised by some individuals and groups of African heritage as providing a very limited view of the history of the transatlantic slave trade, resistance and abolition (Hudson 2007). The Brookes as a symbol for the history and legacy of the slave trade will be explored in this article as a means to create a deeper understanding of the message and meaning of the image for audiences.

The history of the Brookes image is one which has been largely left untold alongside its use in museums and galleries. Its employment by the abolitionists to campaign against the slave trade is perhaps considered 'common knowledge.' Woods (2000: 16) relays the genesis of the image which depicts in cross-section and overhead view the number of enslaved individuals that the Liverpool slave ship the Brookes could legally hold.

The Brookes ship (1789)

http://www.history.ac.uk/1807commemorated/ima...

“just truce please!”

Level 6

Since: Aug 11

Location hidden

#8 May 29, 2012
Have you seen this commercial before?

&fe ature=player_detailpage

It was always so random.
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
Frank

Clarkston, MI

#9 May 29, 2012
Selling a mother from her child:

http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/ows/semin...

Anti-slavery authors searched for events to fictionalize so as to heighten the agitation of a northern readers. In January 1856 such an event occurred. In a year that included John Brown's Pottawatomie Massacre and Preston Brooks, one of South Carolina's representatives, attempted homicide of Massachusetts Senator Charles Sumner, other attempted murders and a homicide occurred. On January 27, Margaret Garner attacked her four children and killed one of them, a two year old. Garner and her children had runaway from Kentucky but were surrounded by slave catchers in Ohio. It was a front page story in the North but never appeared in print in the South.

Garner's infanticide caused a dilemma for Northern authors. Would white, middle class readers have sympathy for a murdering mother? Having committed an 'unnatural act' such as killing her own child, would Margaret Garner's story turn audiences away from slave mothers? If slave mothers were savages then why should they be set free on Northern soil?

Later that summer, Harriet Beecher Stowe author of Uncle Tom's Cabin published Dred. It contained an instance when a slave mother killed her two children. Other authors did attempt to portray such an instance in their own fiction. Race, femininity, motherhood, enslavement and violence directed toward children became entwined in these novels.

Garner herself was of West African descent, lived her entire life as a slave, and had murdered one of her own children. Northern readers were far removed from her.
Authors added attributes to their fictional Garner in order to develop sympathy in the readers. In two novels, Garner became nearly white with only a tincture of black blood. In other stories Garner's character spoke of salvation of death for the female child who would later be sexually assaulted by a white slaveholder. In the Victorian ante-bellum world a mother who murdered a child violated the sacred charge given to all mothers to protect their children.

Authors stressed that the Garner character was fulfilling rather than rejecting this sacred charge. With only one option of putting a child out of harm's, mothers slew their children. Infanticide was not an act of beast-like violence but one of desperate sacrifice. Women characters in antebellum fiction could engage in violence in only one way---suicide. Suicide was self-determination. In suicide, women remained victims.

A large number of antebellum fictional characters who were female slaves, committed suicide. In Uncle Tom's Cabin, Lucy drowned herself when she learned her child had been sold away from her. In another story, a female slave drank poison rather than submit to her new owner, a rapist. In Another story, a female slave threatened suicide after her rescuer from slavery attempted rape. When mothers killed children to prevent the child's destruction at the hands of a rapist, they were also committing suicide by suppressing their innate maternal instincts to preserve the child.

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_oNrGEbZjtPo/S9dAwP4...
Frank

Clarkston, MI

#10 May 29, 2012
hiwhatisyourname wrote:
Have you seen this commercial before?
No, I haven't.

Thanks.

I'll be sure to check it out when I get the time!

Since: May 12

Location hidden

#11 May 29, 2012
Frank wrote:
This is a picture of slaves being auctioned off to their slave owners.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/abolitio...
This image truly shows the horrible treatment of African Women Slaves in the South. The first thing to notice in this picture is the daughter holding on to her mother. Just like Stephanie Li talked about in the article above, women who had children didn’t always get to take care of their children. Most of the time, the women were separated from their children, because they would be sold to different families, and possibly never see each other again. The woman on the ground holding the infant is probably next in line to be sold off as well. This woman more than likely would not be taken away from her child, just because the child still needs to be tended to.
The second thing to notice is the African man in the background being beaten by his master. This man is probably the husband of the woman being sold and knows they are about to never see each other again. So in desperation to fight back, he probably is being beaten for his actions. This is very typical of how slaves were treated by their masters as well. Anytime the slaves acted out in anyway, they were punished, and the most popular form of punishment was to be beaten.
Another thing to notice is all of the White Men standing around the auction block. One of the men even has a whip in his hand. The whip resembles, again, the harsh punishment all slaves endured. Also the way the men are looking at the woman, looks to me like they are looking at her as if she is just a piece of meat. This type of behavior shown by the masters, eventually normally lead to sexual harassment.
They didn't consider BP to be human, that's how they were able to justify their behavior.
Many whites still don't consider BP to be human, and actually some of us do behave like animals.
Frank

Clarkston, MI

#12 May 29, 2012
Shalimarr wrote:
They didn't consider BP to be human, that's how they were able to justify their behavior.
Many whites still don't consider BP to be human, and actually some of us do behave like animals.
Some people in ALL RACES, like Ted Bundy and Charles Manson, "behave like animals".

So, what is your point???

Level 9

Since: Nov 10

.

#13 May 29, 2012
Great thread Frank...
Frank

Clarkston, MI

#14 May 29, 2012
Illustration of blacks packed like sardines in a slaveship:

http://i.ytimg.com/vi/KLygWUcS4Q4/0.jpg
Frank

Buckingham, UK

#15 May 29, 2012
Frank

Clarkston, MI

#16 May 29, 2012
Inspection and sale of a black man:

http://ionenewsone.files.wordpress.com/2009/1...
Frank

Clarkston, MI

#17 May 29, 2012
This is an illustration from one of many books publidhed by the American abolitiomnist movement. It illustrated text sescribing the use of bloodhounds to track fugitive slaves. The illustrator is not identified, but the illustration itself appears to be based on an illustration first published in Henry Bibb's 'Narrative of the Life and Adventures of ... an American Slave'(New York, 1849). Te actual illustration here appeared in an anonamous book,'The Suppressed Book About Slavery!'. It was prepared for publication in 1857, but actually published in New York during the Civil War (1864). This comes from a collection od slave images from the University of Virginia Library.

http://histclo.com/imagef/date/2010/04/NW0198...
Frank

Clarkston, MI

#18 May 29, 2012
MsNewNew wrote:
Great thread Frank...
Thanks, MsNewNew!

I hope you have a nice day!

:^)
Frank

Buckingham, UK

#19 May 29, 2012
Frank

Clarkston, MI

#20 May 29, 2012
Slave "patrollers," mostly poor whites, were given the authority to stop, search, whip, maim, and even kill any slave who violated the slave codes. Abolitionists cited the slave codes as example of the barbarism of Southern society.

http://www.web-books.com/eLibrary/Books/B0/B5...

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