Why do Afrocentrists obsess over Egyp...

“Africa”

Level 7

Since: Jan 12

Oakland

#5807 Apr 6, 2013
Nagas74 wrote:
<quoted text>
"afro-mutts" you say? Thank you for this post white boy. You are a white troll posing as a black Tom. You are also full of contradictions as you have said numerous times before that AEs were black Africans....now you are flipping the script with the "AEs cluster closest to modern Egyptians" white man's d.n.a. alphabet soup fuckery.
I'm not flipping anything, you illiterate donkey puss.

I just posted irrefutable evidence that modern egyptians are the same as ancient egyptians, not freakin' arabs.

And what does your stu9id a$$ mean "white man's DNA"? Do you not realize that SOY Keita is Black, dumm dope?

[QUOTE who="Nagas74"There are many present day black Egyptians[/QUOTE]

Then what the fck is your debunked, bent wrist-having, dyslexic c00n a$$ cryin' about, besides being raped and slapped around by facts?

If there are "many present day black Egyptians", and they mainly reside in the southern regions of Egypt, and Egyptians are proven to be native African, then how is that not just like Ancient Egypt?

What an idi0t you are.

“Try harder :)”

Level 8

Since: Oct 11

Location hidden

#5808 Apr 6, 2013
@Bakari Neferu

Aye...Again no one is saying the Ancient Egyptians clustered with West Africans, again DNAtribes study did not say that(Barros keep insisting that I think that which is why I ignored him). I personally do not know what Disasters Looms is talking about.

But I suggest you read more through the thread, because some people made some interesting points.

Here is what member The Explorer says to Truthcentric(Truthcentric is white btw):

"But it shouldn't surprise you. Populations retreating from the desiccating Sahara had found their way southward, not only to the coastal areas of the north."

"Considering your alternative, there must have been some changes through the ages, since the Benin haplotype HbS persists in Egyptian population today, whereas it is all but absent in the African Horn.

Additionally, ties to African populations presently distant from Egypt should not puzzle anyone in the know, since the core ancient Egyptian population would have ultimately drawn from a shared ancestral gene pool that crosscuts the different living African populations, aside from more recent common origins in the Saharan belt."

Here is what Djehuti(who is Filipino btw) says:
"Because the great dessication of North Africa caused much population upheaval and migratory dispersions, this created a chain reaction of migrations like a domino affect! For so long I've only been focusing on West African connections to Egypt via the Central Sahara, but I forgot that there were various pre-Bantu even pre-Benue groups and peoples living in the Central Sahara during the Holocene Wetness as well as early Nilotic groups. Some of these groups migrated further south before the dessication perhaps due to population expansions since North Africa at that time was rich in food supply and resources. When the dessication happened they were pushed further south and/or mixed with groups escaping desertification. Of course the Bantu language expansion took place well after these events which is why many Bantu-speaking people in South Africa today carry indigenous lineages to the region instead of West-Central African lineages associated with Bantu which again shows the difference between bio-genesis and ethnogenesis. And let's not forget the various Nilotic peoples who inhabited much of central and eastern Africa before Bantus as well."

Also here is what DNAtribes says...

"Q: What is the scientific basis for DNA Tribes method of analysis?

A: DNA Tribes® is a private firm specializing in genetic ancestry analysis, including both geographical analysis of world populations and the comparison of individuals to living populations and world regions. DNA Tribes’
proprietary analysis has been developed by Dr. Eduardas Valaitis, who received his Doctorate in Statistics from Yale University in 2005. Dr. Valaitis has been an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at American University in Washington, D.C. Dr. Valaitis’ background includes extensive work in
multivariate analysis and classification, which involves identifying mathematical structure present within large and complex datasets. This expertise allows DNA Tribes to perform a uniquely detailed and comprehensive analysis of
world populations to identify genetic structure on an objective mathematical basis. All data used in our analysis COME FROM PEER-REVIEWED SCIENTIFIC STUDIES OF WORLD POPULATIONS. Our unique U.S. Patent Pending method of analysis is available exclusively through DNA Tribes."

“Try harder :)”

Level 8

Since: Oct 11

Location hidden

#5809 Apr 6, 2013
@Bakari Neferu

I also stated their was a study done that was led by Zahi Hawass that confirmed Ramesses III was E1b1a. Where is E1b1a mostly found?
http://i49.tinypic.com/2mpy8sw.jpg

Here is the study.

"Revisiting the harem conspiracy and death of Ramesses III: anthropological, forensic, radiological, and genetic study"

http://www.bmj.com/content/345/bmj.e8268

Zahi Hawass, egyptologist1,
Somaia Ismail, professor of molecular biology23,
Ashraf Selim, professor of radiology4,
Sahar N Saleem, professor of radiology4,
Dina Fathalla, molecular biologist3,
Sally Wasef, molecular biologist5,
Ahmed Z Gad, molecular biologist3,
Rama Saad, molecular biologist3,
Suzan Fares, molecular biologist3,
Hany Amer, assistant professor of pharmacology6,
Paul Gostner, radiologist7,
Yehia Z Gad, professor of molecular genetics2,
Carsten M Pusch, molecular biologist8,
Albert R Zink, paleopathologist9

"Genetic kinship analyses revealed identical haplotypes in both mummies (table 1&#8659;); using the Whit Athey’s haplogroup predictor, we determined the Y chromosomal haplogroup E1b1a. The testing of polymorphic autosomal microsatellite loci provided similar results in at least one allele of each marker (table 2&#8659;). Although the mummy of Ramesses III’s wife Tiy was not available for testing, the identical Y chromosomal DNA and autosomal half allele sharing of the two male mummies strongly suggest a father-son relationship."

So DNAtribes saying King Tut had West African ancestry(as in the genes he carried) doesn't seem far fetch.

Also DNAtribes does a latter study on King Ramesses III.
http://dnatribes.com/dnatribes-digest-2013-02...

"In addition, these DNA match results in present day world regions might in part express
population changes in Africa after the time of Ramesses III. In particular, DNA matches in PRESENT day populations of Southern Africa and the African Great Lakes might to some degree reflect genetic links with ancient populations (formerly living closer to New Kingdom Egypt) that have expanded southwards
in the Nilotic and Bantu migrations of the past 3,000 years (see Figure 1)"

“Africa”

Level 7

Since: Jan 12

Oakland

#5810 Apr 6, 2013
big mike M wrote:
But I suggest you read more through the thread, because some people made some interesting points.
Here is what member The Explorer says to Truthcentric(Truthcentric is white btw):
"But it shouldn't surprise you. Populations retreating from the desiccating Sahara had found their way southward, not only to the coastal areas of the north."
"Considering your alternative, there must have been some changes through the ages, since the Benin haplotype HbS persists in Egyptian population today, whereas it is all but absent in the African Horn.
Additionally, ties to African populations presently distant from Egypt should not puzzle anyone in the know, since the core ancient Egyptian population would have ultimately drawn from a shared ancestral gene pool that crosscuts the different living African populations, aside from more recent common origins in the Saharan belt."
I'm not really interested in reading through that entire 27 page thread.

Also, what "shared ancestral gene pool that crosscuts the different living African populations" is that guy referring to?
big mike M wrote:
Here is what Djehuti(who is Filipino btw) says:
"Because the great dessication of North Africa caused much population upheaval and migratory dispersions, this created a chain reaction of migrations like a domino affect! For so long I've only been focusing on West African connections to Egypt via the Central Sahara, but I forgot that there were various pre-Bantu even pre-Benue groups and peoples living in the Central Sahara during the Holocene Wetness as well as early Nilotic groups. Some of these groups migrated further south before the dessication perhaps due to population expansions since North Africa at that time was rich in food supply and resources. When the dessication happened they were pushed further south and/or mixed with groups escaping desertification. Of course the Bantu language expansion took place well after these events which is why many Bantu-speaking people in South Africa today carry indigenous lineages to the region instead of West-Central African lineages associated with Bantu which again shows the difference between bio-genesis and ethnogenesis. And let's not forget the various Nilotic peoples who inhabited much of central and eastern Africa before Bantus as well."
Most West Africans who came from the Sahara came from the Western, Southern and Central region. Most Egyptians who came from the Sahara came from the Eastern region:

Using phraseology such as "they came from the Sahara" is largely ambiguous since the Sahara is almost as large as the United States, meaning you can have people who came the Sahara and still not have anything to do with each other.

"On a longer time-scale, there is good circumstantial evidence in support of hte view that Late Holocene climatic dessication was associated with migration of cattle-herders from the central and southern Sahara into West Africa (A.B. Smith, 19800. A further repercussion of this dessication was the probable movement of pastoralists away from the eastern Sahara toward the Nile (J.D. Clark, 1980a)." pp.75 From Hunters to Farmers

http://goo.gl/sHm0M

“Try harder :)”

Level 8

Since: Oct 11

Location hidden

#5811 Apr 6, 2013
Bakari Neferu wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm not really interested in reading through that entire 27 page thread.
Also, what "shared ancestral gene pool that crosscuts the different living African populations" is that guy referring to?
<quoted text>
Most West Africans who came from the Sahara came from the Western, Southern and Central region. Most Egyptians who came from the Sahara came from the Eastern region:
Using phraseology such as "they came from the Sahara" is largely ambiguous since the Sahara is almost as large as the United States, meaning you can have people who came the Sahara and still not have anything to do with each other.
"On a longer time-scale, there is good circumstantial evidence in support of hte view that Late Holocene climatic dessication was associated with migration of cattle-herders from the central and southern Sahara into West Africa (A.B. Smith, 19800. A further repercussion of this dessication was the probable movement of pastoralists away from the eastern Sahara toward the Nile (J.D. Clark, 1980a)." pp.75 From Hunters to Farmers
http://goo.gl/sHm0M
Why don't you create a thread on Egyptsearch about DNAtribes test on the arama mummies and your opinion of it. They'll give you a more detailed answers than I would. This will make things more simple and it will quickly solve all this. Their good people and will help you out.

Again they'll give you a much better detailed answers than I would.

“Africa”

Level 7

Since: Jan 12

Oakland

#5812 Apr 6, 2013
big mike M wrote:
@Bakari Neferu
I also stated their was a study done that was led by Zahi Hawass that confirmed Ramesses III was E1b1a. Where is E1b1a mostly found?
http://i49.tinypic.com/2mpy8sw.jpg
Here is the study.
"Revisiting the harem conspiracy and death of Ramesses III: anthropological, forensic, radiological, and genetic study"
http://www.bmj.com/content/345/bmj.e8268
Zahi Hawass, egyptologist1,
Somaia Ismail, professor of molecular biology23,
Ashraf Selim, professor of radiology4,
Sahar N Saleem, professor of radiology4,
Dina Fathalla, molecular biologist3,
Sally Wasef, molecular biologist5,
Ahmed Z Gad, molecular biologist3,
Rama Saad, molecular biologist3,
Suzan Fares, molecular biologist3,
Hany Amer, assistant professor of pharmacology6,
Paul Gostner, radiologist7,
Yehia Z Gad, professor of molecular genetics2,
Carsten M Pusch, molecular biologist8,
Albert R Zink, paleopathologist9
"Genetic kinship analyses revealed identical haplotypes in both mummies (table 1&#8659;); using the Whit Athey’s haplogroup predictor, we determined the Y chromosomal haplogroup E1b1a. The testing of polymorphic autosomal microsatellite loci provided similar results in at least one allele of each marker (table 2&#8659;). Although the mummy of Ramesses III’s wife Tiy was not available for testing, the identical Y chromosomal DNA and autosomal half allele sharing of the two male mummies strongly suggest a father-son relationship."
So DNAtribes saying King Tut had West African ancestry(as in the genes he carried) doesn't seem far fetch.
Also DNAtribes does a latter study on King Ramesses III.
http://dnatribes.com/dnatribes-digest-2013-02...
"In addition, these DNA match results in present day world regions might in part express
population changes in Africa after the time of Ramesses III. In particular, DNA matches in PRESENT day populations of Southern Africa and the African Great Lakes might to some degree reflect genetic links with ancient populations (formerly living closer to New Kingdom Egypt) that have expanded southwards
in the Nilotic and Bantu migrations of the past 3,000 years (see Figure 1)"
I already know this, and I know that it means virtually nothing. Egyptians have a small amount of E1b1a, a haplogroup that is supposed to have originated from East Africa anyway. So what exactly is a pharaoh having that haplogroup supposed to prove?

And in any case, I don't care about one pharaoh's DNA. This discussion is concerning the Egyptian population at large, which has practically nothing to do with West Africans, and vice versa.

Also, just to make it clear, I am referring about Ancient Egypt and in ancient times. What you and those other people are talking about would have been prehistoric times, well before the rise of any kingdoms in either region.

My central argument is and always has been that West Africans didn't come from Egypt. We have nothing to do with the creation of any of the civilizations there, and they didn't diffuse any of their culture to us, as there is no hard evidence for it. West Africans barely got influence, if any, from Carthage, and they are known to have dealt with them, whether directly or indirectly, so it makes even less sense to assume that Egyptians had any real effect at at all on West Africans. Not to say that that is what you are saying, but it has been said before by others, and I'm just setting the record straight.

You seem to be arguing a completely different argument than what I am arguing.

There is no real connection between the two peoples except the superficial one of them coming from the same continent and having ancestry tracing to east Africa. Whatever haplogroups they might share is more so due to common, distant ancestry, no more different than that of West Africans and Berbers, or West Africans and Horners, etc., rather than direct ancestry.

“Africa”

Level 7

Since: Jan 12

Oakland

#5813 Apr 6, 2013
big mike M wrote:
<quoted text>
Why don't you create a thread on Egyptsearch about DNAtribes test on the arama mummies and your opinion of it. They'll give you a more detailed answers than I would. This will make things more simple and it will quickly solve all this. Their good people and will help you out.
Again they'll give you a much better detailed answers than I would.
I can't create a thread on there because the freakin' administrators won't OK my account. I've been waiting for weeks since I first registered and no response.

In any case, I don't care about the DNA tribes. Everything I already knew was confirmed.

The tests are falsifiable and should not be taken as anything exact, or even close to exact.
Nagas74

United States

#5815 Apr 6, 2013
Bakari Neferu wrote:
<quoted text>
I can't create a thread on there because the freakin' administrators won't OK my account. I've been waiting for weeks since I first registered and no response.
In any case, I don't care about the DNA tribes. Everything I already knew was confirmed.
The tests are falsifiable and should not be taken as anything exact, or even close to exact.
Lol Those administrators have the right idea! They probably know that you are a Coon or a white troll.

“Try harder :)”

Level 8

Since: Oct 11

Location hidden

#5816 Apr 6, 2013
This is REAL African history. Interesting video on the Nubians.
http://www.youtube.com/watch...

Also I think the Kongo Kingdom is the most underrated Kingdom and doesn't get a lot of praise. Check out this blog I made about the Kingdom on my site.
http://black-earth.webs.com/apps/blog/show/25...

“Try harder :)”

Level 8

Since: Oct 11

Location hidden

#5817 Apr 6, 2013
Bakari Neferu wrote:
<quoted text>
I can't create a thread on there because the freakin' administrators won't OK my account. I've been waiting for weeks since I first registered and no response.
In any case, I don't care about the DNA tribes. Everything I already knew was confirmed.
The tests are falsifiable and should not be taken as anything exact, or even close to exact.
Which Egyptsearch did you register for? There are TWO...Regular Egyptsearch and Egyptsearch reloaded. I had problems with Egyptsearch reloaded.

And what was confirmed?
Nagas74

United States

#5818 Apr 6, 2013
Bakari Neferu wrote:
<quoted text>
I already know this, and I know that it means virtually nothing. Egyptians have a small amount of E1b1a, a haplogroup that is supposed to have originated from East Africa anyway. So what exactly is a pharaoh having that haplogroup supposed to prove?
And in any case, I don't care about one pharaoh's DNA. This discussion is concerning the Egyptian population at large, which has practically nothing to do with West Africans, and vice versa.
Also, just to make it clear, I am referring about Ancient Egypt and in ancient times. What you and those other people are talking about would have been prehistoric times, well before the rise of any kingdoms in either region.
My central argument is and always has been that West Africans didn't come from Egypt. We have nothing to do with the creation of any of the civilizations there, and they didn't diffuse any of their culture to us, as there is no hard evidence for it. West Africans barely got influence, if any, from Carthage, and they are known to have dealt with them, whether directly or indirectly, so it makes even less sense to assume that Egyptians had any real effect at at all on West Africans. Not to say that that is what you are saying, but it has been said before by others, and I'm just setting the record straight.
You seem to be arguing a completely different argument than what I am arguing.
There is no real connection between the two peoples except the superficial one of them coming from the same continent and having ancestry tracing to east Africa. Whatever haplogroups they might share is more so due to common, distant ancestry, no more different than that of West Africans and Berbers, or West Africans and Horners, etc., rather than direct ancestry.
This post has "white troll" written all over it. Just admit you are a Euroclown posing as a sell-out minded KNEEGROW. Your intent is to confuse or derail blacks who refuse to believe in Western Academias version of black history off course. It is a common theme with white trolls on topix. Espouse pure Eurocentric ideas under the guise of being a black poster. The logic behind it being that maybe blacks might buy into the lies better if they think that the poster is black. At best you are an Uncle Tom.

“Africa”

Level 7

Since: Jan 12

Oakland

#5819 Apr 6, 2013
Nagas74 wrote:
<quoted text>
Lol Those administrators have the right idea! They probably know that you are a Coon or a white troll.
They don't know sh8t about me, phaggot fool.

I'm no c99n or troll, just your b8tch a$$. And unlike your c99nish, trollish b8tch a$$, I actually have some semblance of intelligence and can actually conduct a proper debate.

Personally I think they just might be off duty.

“Try harder :)”

Level 8

Since: Oct 11

Location hidden

#5820 Apr 6, 2013
Bakari Neferu wrote:
<quoted text>
I already know this, and I know that it means virtually nothing. Egyptians have a small amount of E1b1a, a haplogroup that is supposed to have originated from East Africa anyway. So what exactly is a pharaoh having that haplogroup supposed to prove?
And in any case, I don't care about one pharaoh's DNA. This discussion is concerning the Egyptian population at large, which has practically nothing to do with West Africans, and vice versa.
Also, just to make it clear, I am referring about Ancient Egypt and in ancient times. What you and those other people are talking about would have been prehistoric times, well before the rise of any kingdoms in either region.
My central argument is and always has been that West Africans didn't come from Egypt. We have nothing to do with the creation of any of the civilizations there, and they didn't diffuse any of their culture to us, as there is no hard evidence for it. West Africans barely got influence, if any, from Carthage, and they are known to have dealt with them, whether directly or indirectly, so it makes even less sense to assume that Egyptians had any real effect at at all on West Africans. Not to say that that is what you are saying, but it has been said before by others, and I'm just setting the record straight.
You seem to be arguing a completely different argument than what I am arguing.
There is no real connection between the two peoples except the superficial one of them coming from the same continent and having ancestry tracing to east Africa. Whatever haplogroups they might share is more so due to common, distant ancestry, no more different than that of West Africans and Berbers, or West Africans and Horners, etc., rather than direct ancestry.
Again you and Barros are still missing my point. I have said this a million times that DNAtribes wasn't testing the WHOLE Ancient Egyptian population, but JUST the royal Amarna mummies, I also said some royal Egyptian families from different dynasties had different origins...

Yes we seem to be arguing something different. I am not arguing that the Ancient Egyptians were West African like you and Barros think. I am basically defending the DNAtribes results. DNAtribes is talking about the ancestry of those mummies. Yes people who carried E1b1a could have lived in East Africa(where it arose, which is what DNAtribes must be talking about when it means Tropical West African.

Again for the LAST TIME! I am not arguing that the Ancient Egyptians are related to MODERN DAY WEST AFRICANS.
Nagas74

United States

#5821 Apr 6, 2013
Bakari Neferu wrote:
<quoted text>
They don't know sh8t about me, phaggot fool.
I'm no c99n or troll, just your b8tch a$$. And unlike your c99nish, trollish b8tch a$$, I actually have some semblance of intelligence and can actually conduct a proper debate.
Personally I think they just might be off duty.
You are a Coon or a white troll posing as a Coon.

“Africa”

Level 7

Since: Jan 12

Oakland

#5822 Apr 6, 2013
big mike M wrote:
<quoted text>
Which Egyptsearch did you register for? There are TWO...Regular Egyptsearch and Egyptsearch reloaded. I had problems with Egyptsearch reloaded.
And what was confirmed?
I registered for the original Egyptsearch that you kept linking to throughout this discourse.

What was essentially confirmed is that no real scientist takes that DNAtribes test seriously. The people in that forum didn't even seem to take it seriously, and in fact, one of those posters even admitted that it was "non-scientific", and, get this....

SHOULD BE TAKEN WITH A GRAIN OF SALT.

What more can I say?

“Africa”

Level 7

Since: Jan 12

Oakland

#5823 Apr 6, 2013
Nagas74 wrote:
<quoted text>
You are a Coon or a white troll posing as a Coon.
Then how come your herpes blister infected face has never produced any evidence of such a thing?

I can easily go back no more than 5 pages into this thread and prove just how much of an obsessive phaggot groupie you are. Every single post you post wreaks of phaggot groupieism, c99nism, and trollism.

Where can you find my trollism or c00ism? Show me the post, senseless lipstick-wearing tranny wh8re.

“Africa”

Level 7

Since: Jan 12

Oakland

#5824 Apr 6, 2013
Nagas74 wrote:
<quoted text>
This post has "white troll" written all over it. Just admit you are a Euroclown posing as a sell-out minded KNEEGROW. Your intent is to confuse or derail blacks who refuse to believe in Western Academias version of black history off course. It is a common theme with white trolls on topix. Espouse pure Eurocentric ideas under the guise of being a black poster. The logic behind it being that maybe blacks might buy into the lies better if they think that the poster is black. At best you are an Uncle Tom.
What the f8ck is this gay cross-dressing jelly custard rambling about?

“Try harder :)”

Level 8

Since: Oct 11

Location hidden

#5825 Apr 6, 2013
Bakari Neferu wrote:
<quoted text>
I registered for the original Egyptsearch that you kept linking to throughout this discourse.
What was essentially confirmed is that no real scientist takes that DNAtribes test seriously. The people in that forum didn't even seem to take it seriously, and in fact, one of those posters even admitted that it was "non-scientific", and, get this....
SHOULD BE TAKEN WITH A GRAIN OF SALT.
What more can I say?
Most argued it was valid and I even posted something to you from DNAtribes which states it uses peer-reviewed scientific studies of world populations. Anyways I'm going to agree-disagree.

I was never saying modern day. West Africans were related to the Ancient Egyptians.
Nagas74

United States

#5826 Apr 6, 2013
big mike M wrote:
<quoted text>
Again you and Barros are still missing my point. I have said this a million times that DNAtribes wasn't testing the WHOLE Ancient Egyptian population, but JUST the royal Amarna mummies, I also said some royal Egyptian families from different dynasties had different origins...
Yes we seem to be arguing something different. I am not arguing that the Ancient Egyptians were West African like you and Barros think. I am basically defending the DNAtribes results. DNAtribes is talking about the ancestry of those mummies. Yes people who carried E1b1a could have lived in East Africa(where it arose, which is what DNAtribes must be talking about when it means Tropical West African.
Again for the LAST TIME! I am not arguing that the Ancient Egyptians are related to MODERN DAY WEST AFRICANS.
Stop your whining you little ignorant fence riding bitch. Lol Begging this SuperCyberCoon for acceptance like some little insecure child. Get a stance and stick with it clown.

“Try harder :)”

Level 8

Since: Oct 11

Location hidden

#5827 Apr 6, 2013
Nagas74 wrote:
<quoted text>
You are a Coon or a white troll posing as a Coon.
I thought I was the white troll.

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