why do italians get mistaken for bein...

why do italians get mistaken for bein spanish

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Since: Jun 08

duval

#1 Jul 1, 2008
i just wanna know

“My Great Grandmother”

Since: Feb 08

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#2 Jul 1, 2008
although not an aa topic... the difference between a spanish person and an italian one is quite obvious.

Since: Jun 08

duval

#3 Jul 1, 2008
im italian folks think im spanish cus i got dark skin but i dunno cus i dad was adopted and he mite have spanish in him. but for example folks think the gotti boys spanish naw they italian

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Since: Feb 08

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#4 Jul 1, 2008
trilla wrote:
i just wanna know
People from Spain and Italy are related people. They speak languages which are close and they look pretty similar... both mediterranean countries. What so hard to understand about that?

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Since: Feb 08

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#5 Jul 1, 2008
lovable1 wrote:
although not an aa topic... the difference between a spanish person and an italian one is quite obvious.
I disagree unless by "Spanish", you mean Hispanic like Mexicans or Salvadorians, but not people from Spain.

“Missing Mickey!!”

Since: Mar 08

St.Louis

#6 Jul 1, 2008
wow this is soooo true!! my husband is ALWAYS getting asked is he is spanish! more or so puerto rican!! ALL THE TIME..its crazy but funny..he speaks some spanish but more italian than anything. he will speak with spanish people in spanish then tell them he is italian and they are like NOOOOO...lol...then he starts speakig in italian and they are like ok...my husband says they are very closely related??

Since: May 08

AOL

#7 Jul 1, 2008
Anyone who thinks the Gotti boys are ''Spanish'' are dopes. First off, they're not even Italians. They're spray tanned weirdo's. They're lucky their family has become a tabloid and has no power anymore, otherwise it would have been a depressing end to their family's ''power.'' Because trust me, those kid's literally look like women. I honestly can believe them nearly having a heart attack after not being in contact with their mother for over 3 hours in one episode.

Why do Italians get mistaken for being Spanish? The answer's actually a lot simpler than you guy's think, but you just may not be putting two and two together. Italian's simply don't have an identity in this country. Don't believe the Census telling you hillbilly towns like St. Mary, Florida are ''10 percent'' of Italian descent. The truth is they're more like 3 to 4 percent.

Anyone can tell you the most Italian descended area in New Jersey is North and/or central, even though the census awkwardly says south is. They say little hick towns are like 30-40 percent, meanwhile all of you could look through the white pages and look through last names for yourself and know this isn't true.

Those people accumulate fake numbers. In the 2000 Census, approximately 11 million people were physically recorded as saying they were of Italian descent. Half of that said they were full, the other half said they were 1/2, 1/4 (or occasionally 3/8 or 1/8 - anyone below 1/8 wasn't recorded).

However, the United States Census says there were also ''possibly'' up to 4.6 million more American's of partial Italian lineage who were not demographically reported. Honestly, I don't believe this. The number would be more like a million, although these people are likely not to have Italian surnames because of mixture. In fact, they'd likely be as low as one-fourth and sometimes one-eigth for the newer generation, so they really wouldn't be much of Italian's anyway.

In the 2000 Census, there were about 281 million people in America. Counting the legitimate 11 million American's of Italian descent, that'd mean they make up 3.9% of the general population. The U.S. Census however says it's 5.6%, so it's obvious that extra 1.7% comes from the ''plug in the gap'' hick areas that all of us know have few people of Italian ancestry.

Group's that are barely even known such as the NIAF (National Italian American Foundation) even get more ridiculous. Fine, the Census screws up a little bit. We expect it. This group says that there's 26 million people of Italian ancestry in America, even though when ever you e-mail or contact them trying to find out asking for what resources they used to tabulate that information, they never respond. To say over 9 percent of America's of that background is not just ridiculous, but a joke. To say it's as much as Mexican, Irish and English would be hilarious. You don't need to have number's to have importance. If anyone wants people who obviously aren't in their group to be apart of their's, that's pretty sad and shows extreme weakness. Italian descent exists as much as Polish and French (French-Canadian included) which are also about 3.5-4% of America each.

Since: May 08

AOL

#8 Jul 1, 2008
Now I know a lot of people are asking, why did this guy write all this background information? The reason was to show you that people of Italian descent simply aren't that demographically significant to America's population.

Most people of Italian background had their ancestor's come in between 1900-1924. America was already established by than. They usually chose the Northeast and central more than anywhere else. They influenced those cities somewhat, but other places like the south, mid-west and northwest got very little of this. Italian's culture in America is heavily centered in food, although it's basically been Americanized. If someone heard the word Italian in America, they think food. Not people. And if they were thinking of people, they'd literally think of Italy itself. Not their descendants in America.

The truth is there's no distinction that makes Italian's unique in America anymore. Many have mixed out. They're economically as mainstream as any background's going to be. Many have left Catholicism either for marriage with non-Italian's (or other religious interests). Many live in area's that simply aren't religious. What really makes being Italian any different than being the typical normal dry white plain American? Not a whole lot.

There's really only three thing's. One, their ancestor's came to this country a little later than most European-Americans, but a centuries still a really long time. Almost no one is alive from those generations. This isn't something you can identify though. You'd have to know the person and dig for it. Two, their last names.

Contrary to those who actually had it happen, most Italians didn't discrasefully change their last names because their master asked them too, even though many for a while would never question him ever again and trash talk group's that never did nothing to him. Even if it had been altered or shortened, it usually remained an Italian name.

This is what makes them so easily to be confused. Being that America simply doesn't have much of an aquantince with people the Italian background in general, they'd assume a name that sounds similar to Spanish is Spanish. The reason why they'd assume it's Spanish is because 15 percent of America's of Latin American background. Being that Italian, Spanish and Portuguese are all very similar, there are many multi-origin names such as ''Franco'' too.

Often times though, people won't assume or simply rely on a name to dignify someone. If they did, they may assume they're a Latin American possibly mixed with a European-American because they'd physically appear to be just a normal European-American who's obviously not foreign. People know what Spanish names are in America. People just don't know Italian names are. Usually the only areas where they do is where Italian lineage ranges from 6-10% or higher, like NYC, NJ, PA, Connecticut or Rhode Island.

“Come Ride The Peace Train.”

Since: May 08

Misanthropy, US

#9 Jul 1, 2008
Well, when you live in a country that solely bases race on the exterior of a person-your going to get stupid gits who go by looks alone and thus think you may be Spanish.

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Since: Feb 08

Location hidden

#10 Jul 1, 2008
Sevas Tra wrote:
Well, when you live in a country that solely bases race on the exterior of a person-your going to get stupid gits who go by looks alone and thus think you may be Spanish.
Spanish is not a race. People in Spain are Europeans just like Italians. In Argentina many people are of Spanish and Italian descent.. they make no big distinction.

Since: Jun 08

duval

#11 Jul 1, 2008
Tom M in NJ wrote:
Anyone who thinks the Gotti boys are ''Spanish'' are dopes. First off, they're not even Italians. They're spray tanned weirdo's. They're lucky their family has become a tabloid and has no power anymore, otherwise it would have been a depressing end to their family's ''power.'' Because trust me, those kid's literally look like women. I honestly can believe them nearly having a heart attack after not being in contact with their mother for over 3 hours in one episode.
Why do Italians get mistaken for being Spanish? The answer's actually a lot simpler than you guy's think, but you just may not be putting two and two together. Italian's simply don't have an identity in this country. Don't believe the Census telling you hillbilly towns like St. Mary, Florida are ''10 percent'' of Italian descent. The truth is they're more like 3 to 4 percent.
Anyone can tell you the most Italian descended area in New Jersey is North and/or central, even though the census awkwardly says south is. They say little hick towns are like 30-40 percent, meanwhile all of you could look through the white pages and look through last names for yourself and know this isn't true.
Those people accumulate fake numbers. In the 2000 Census, approximately 11 million people were physically recorded as saying they were of Italian descent. Half of that said they were full, the other half said they were 1/2, 1/4 (or occasionally 3/8 or 1/8 - anyone below 1/8 wasn't recorded).
However, the United States Census says there were also ''possibly'' up to 4.6 million more American's of partial Italian lineage who were not demographically reported. Honestly, I don't believe this. The number would be more like a million, although these people are likely not to have Italian surnames because of mixture. In fact, they'd likely be as low as one-fourth and sometimes one-eigth for the newer generation, so they really wouldn't be much of Italian's anyway.
In the 2000 Census, there were about 281 million people in America. Counting the legitimate 11 million American's of Italian descent, that'd mean they make up 3.9% of the general population. The U.S. Census however says it's 5.6%, so it's obvious that extra 1.7% comes from the ''plug in the gap'' hick areas that all of us know have few people of Italian ancestry.
Group's that are barely even known such as the NIAF (National Italian American Foundation) even get more ridiculous. Fine, the Census screws up a little bit. We expect it. This group says that there's 26 million people of Italian ancestry in America, even though when ever you e-mail or contact them trying to find out asking for what resources they used to tabulate that information, they never respond. To say over 9 percent of America's of that background is not just ridiculous, but a joke. To say it's as much as Mexican, Irish and English would be hilarious. You don't need to have number's to have importance. If anyone wants people who obviously aren't in their group to be apart of their's, that's pretty sad and shows extreme weakness. Italian descent exists as much as Polish and French (French-Canadian included) which are also about 3.5-4% of America each.
shit bag the gottis is italians there grandfather john gotti is italian retard

Since: May 08

AOL

#12 Jul 1, 2008
As far as actual looks go though, this really varies on the person. I myself am partly of Italian ancestry, which is pretty typical of most people of Italian background who are 19. It's pretty sad too if you think about it, because I was born and grew up on the south shore of Staten Island which is easily at least one-third of Italian background. My mom's side is mostly Irish with a little Spanish (Spain).

Overall, I'd say and get a lot that I look more ethnic than the average white person. Some people just know Italian right away, like in Staten Island or New Jersey. Some thing Spanish too. I get pretty dark during the summer, although I'm naturally a light olive. It's really not so much that though. Not even eye color either, because I got green eyes. It's more like features like the way your eyes and cheek bones are shaped.

The truth is some Italian's got a unique look and other's don't. Sicilian's and other southern Italian's got a higher chance, but still the majority of American's of Italian descent couldn't be identified outside of the norm of a white American. Often I can't be. Definitely not from a distance. I've had a lot of people who I know look and say I just can't put my finger on it or you aren't full of something. Maybe it's partly because I'm one-eight of another Mediterranean ancestry. My ancestry in Italy comes from Bari, Napoli and Calabria, all southern, although not Sicilian. To tell you the truth though, when I'm in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania or in this region, it's harder for people to point this out because they're so used to thinking this look is normal for white's.

Usually the people who ask if I'm Spanish or of a particular Latin American background are those who actually have that background. Usually European-Americans and black Americans don't question. When I lived in Florida though, more white American's asked if I was Spanish. I'd explain to them that for the most part I wasn't, although I was a little. My last name didn't sink in as well there. If it did, it would be as a Latin American, who do have a presence. Being that I'm from New York and have an accent and that so many of the New Yorker's who move to central Florida are of Latin American backgrounds, it also gave them another reason to ask.

Latin American's would be so high in number's not for their particular interest of moving there, but because so many other's move their less. Most Jewish people from the NY area who move to Florida move to southeast near Miami and West Palm beach. That's 21 percent of NYC, at least 15 percent of Long Island and 10 percent of North/central NJ and CT.

Since: May 08

AOL

#13 Jul 1, 2008
Many black's don't come either. More of Caribbean black's or their children move to the eastern central parts like near Orlando because much of their family had immigrated their a couple decades ago as well. Not that many African-Americans move to Florida period though. They're 12 percent of NYC, although likely only 3 percent of the New Yorker's that end up there. They don't really come as much going toward's Tampa where I lived. Few Asians (10%) and Middle Easterners (3%) do too simply because so many are new to the country and haven't been their long enough to leave en masse.

So when you slice off significant portions of all those groups, it really makes Latin American's seem larger (they're 27% of NYC). They're probably 1/3 to 1/2 of who ends up there. Puerto Rican's (9.9%) would be the largest descent of that group because they're already the largest in NY, but also the group that's been their the longest. The second largest group actually would be Italians (8.7%) for the same exact reason. They're both probably 20 percent of who ends up down there. People down there should have been more aquainted with this, but they weren't. They didn't put two and two together well.

When Puerto Rican descendants come down, they're not really be acknowledged as Puerto Rican's though. They're just being acknowledged as middle-class Latin American's who are obviously American (under they're old). Florida's got plenty of their own Latin American immigrants who directly went there (especially Cubans), so they have an identity. However, few Italians ever immigrated to Florida (although there was a port in Tampa that was eventually outpopulated by out of staters). They don't have much of a presence there.
If your mixed, I guess it'd depend on what the other group is. If it's ethnic, you'd either maintain looking Italian and possibly Italian. If you mix with a white American who isn't ethnic probably would just come out looking like the normal white American (no ''Irish'' doesn't count lol - it gets really annoying when anyone says that because it makes actual ethnic nationalities not get taken seriously).

Spanish is really one of the most similar thing's to Italian. Other group's that are similar would be in the Mediterranean like Greeks, Portuguese or Albanians, but those groups simply don't have a presence in America. Spaniards don't either, although their descendants in Latin America (even if they're mixed with non-European blood) do. And they live plenty in America and the number continually rises because of immigration.

Even comparing to those other groups though, Spain's still more culturally similar. The language's are nearly identical. Italy and Spain are (or were) the two most populated countries with the highest Catholic populations in Europe. Italy has 55 million and 97 percent are Catholic (although most aren't practicing and plenty are ''semi-Atheists). Spain has 40 million and is 94 percent Catholic (although probably even more ''semi-Atheist'' than Italy). France is pretty similar to both of them, but they're ethnic identity is being highly compromised with the large sums of immigration that's entered there. There's been plenty of immigration to Spain and Italy, but not to the point that it'd shift their populace's identity.

Since: May 08

AOL

#14 Jul 1, 2008
trilla wrote:
<quoted text>shit bag the gottis is italians there grandfather john gotti is italian retard
I am not questioning literal ''technicalities.'' Yes, they're technically fully of Italian lineage. I say that's as far as it goes though. They don't speak the language. They do nothing Italian culturally. I'm sure when they went to Italy, it was as a rich American tourist, not as an ''Italian.'' People over there would tell them anything they want, because that's what tourism is all about.

By no means are they ''Italian'' though. Being Italian is absolutely useless if it comes down to simply relying on what people technically are and aren't. There's always a way to make some win or lose in that game. Being apart of the Italian culture is much more than that. Not much of it exists in this country. Not much of it exists outside of Italy, nor should it. In my opinion, you are not an ''Italian'' if you can't speak Italian. I know Italian and other Latin groups really praise machismo, so it'd be a real slap in the face to see such feminine products of their ancestry in modern day. Come on, they call thesmelves ''boys.''

By the way, you don't have to insult me. I'm sure the other guy on here knows how that is lol People can get upset quick at me, but don't let a stupid thing like the Gotti boy's get you mad at me. Girl's who like those weird momma's boys are supposed to. Not guy's. Come on, the Rays are in first place. Cheer up lol

“r.i.p. brotha darrows x”

Since: Apr 08

Location hidden

#15 Jul 1, 2008
trilla wrote:
i just wanna know
because meditterranean people look differant to nordic "white"people..

Since: May 08

AOL

#16 Jul 1, 2008
Garrig wrote:
<quoted text>
Spanish is not a race. People in Spain are Europeans just like Italians. In Argentina many people are of Spanish and Italian descent.. they make no big distinction.
Absolutely correct. In fact, a decent amount of the population is literally of both ethnicities too. Not even because we'd expect them to be Catholic, because most aren't religious there. Like all continents, Europe has it's diversity and it's definitely more emphasizes culturally and religiously rather than actually ethnically. Even while discussing ethnically though, these two nationality's are practically brother and sister. Or very good cousin's. Obviously, the most similar groups to Spaniards are Portuguese because they're in the same Peninsula, but the most similar group to Italian's would likely be Spaniards. Or possibly Portuguese or the French before modern immigration.

Since: Jun 08

duval

#17 Jul 1, 2008
Tom M in NJ wrote:
<quoted text>
I am not questioning literal ''technicalities.'' Yes, they're technically fully of Italian lineage. I say that's as far as it goes though. They don't speak the language. They do nothing Italian culturally. I'm sure when they went to Italy, it was as a rich American tourist, not as an ''Italian.'' People over there would tell them anything they want, because that's what tourism is all about.
By no means are they ''Italian'' though. Being Italian is absolutely useless if it comes down to simply relying on what people technically are and aren't. There's always a way to make some win or lose in that game. Being apart of the Italian culture is much more than that. Not much of it exists in this country. Not much of it exists outside of Italy, nor should it. In my opinion, you are not an ''Italian'' if you can't speak Italian. I know Italian and other Latin groups really praise machismo, so it'd be a real slap in the face to see such feminine products of their ancestry in modern day. Come on, they call thesmelves ''boys.''
By the way, you don't have to insult me. I'm sure the other guy on here knows how that is lol People can get upset quick at me, but don't let a stupid thing like the Gotti boy's get you mad at me. Girl's who like those weird momma's boys are supposed to. Not guy's. Come on, the Rays are in first place. Cheer up lol
im italian i can speak it to. u aint gotta speak or look italian to be one retard i swear to ya

Since: May 08

AOL

#18 Jul 1, 2008
trilla wrote:
<quoted text>im italian i can speak it to. u aint gotta speak or look italian to be one retard i swear to ya
Language is culture though. It's the key component. Education. Literature. Art. Music. Religion. It's the umbrella. Without it, everything else is just a side component with no base. If this isn't a necessary factor though, tell me what is.

You have to draw the line in the sand somewhere. Anybody can't just be what ever they want when ever they want.

You didn't dispute the significance of being full, so I'm hoping you acknowledge the importance of that too. Unfortunately for as difficult as it could seem, it's necessary to remain isolated from the rest of the society in terms of marriage and having children in terms of ethnic/cultural preservation. It is a lot to ask though. Most can't do it and that's fine. That's part of assimilation. Losing culture and adapting to a new one is apart of the societal cycle.

As far as looks goes, you're right. It doesn't matter that much. But it sure helps. If you're walking down the street and someone is either able to have an idea you are that or that you're something ''different'', it makes society acknowledge more of who you are. Not everyone has this and this isn't their fault. That's not culture though. Culture isn't what you look. It's what you and your family has contained. Unfortunately part of being Italian or any culture requires your families passing on of it in order to contain it's authenticity. Sure, any of us could be anything we want, but it doesn't have the same personal nature. Those who have the best connection are usually those who speak the language, have the best connection to Italy and family that has arrived the latest. I've known plenty of people who ''look Italian'' who have no cultural concept and some who are ridiculously pale while who are very cultured. Alls looks are is a cover, but it's something all of us love. I know I'm happy looking the way I do.

Since: Jun 08

duval

#19 Jul 1, 2008
Mickey N Ashley wrote:
wow this is soooo true!! my husband is ALWAYS getting asked is he is spanish! more or so puerto rican!! ALL THE TIME..its crazy but funny..he speaks some spanish but more italian than anything. he will speak with spanish people in spanish then tell them he is italian and they are like NOOOOO...lol...then he starts speakig in italian and they are like ok...my husband says they are very closely related??
so ya man white or spanish

“To Thine Own Self Be True”

Level 2

Since: May 08

Boston, MA

#20 Jul 1, 2008
Garrig wrote:
<quoted text>
People from Spain and Italy are related people. They speak languages which are close and they look pretty similar... both mediterranean countries. What so hard to understand about that?
I think alot of people in the US use the term "Spanish" to describe Hispanics, not Europeans.

Of course, the Spanish ARE European, and were one of the biggest colonizing nations in history.

The people there exhibit a variety of physical features, similar to that of Italy, with the northern people having lighter hair, skin and eyes, than the southern people.

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