Django Unchained

“Africa”

Level 7

Since: Jan 12

Oakland

#153 Jan 1, 2013
IkeLike wrote:
<quoted text>
A film can be discussed in a variety of different ways such as its production quality, editing, how it was directed, actors' performances, social commentary, political implications, set design etc. A film can have great production quality (lighting, sound, etc.) but also lack in other areas.
My main cretinism about this film is that it has exploited a serious and sensitive issue like slavery by distorting some of the facts and by pandering to a Black audience for profit. It is not addressing the issue in a real meaningful way. To me slavery should not serve as a backdrop to some action adventure bang bang
shoot-em-up spaghetti western. What's next, a comedy about slavery?
I have no problem with movies about slavery. I also do not have a problem with movies being entertaining. However, if I have to choose between being entertained or respectfully and accurately depicting slavery in motion pictures, I'll take the later.
Yes, but this is America. The culture itself is lacking in substance.

Again, you seem to be blaming symptoms of the real problem here. You say that the movie was not to your liking.

Let's just say it was complete garbage. That is not the real issue.

The issue is that there aren't any Black people out here putting low substance movies like this to shame by making way better movies.

People can make movies like this because Blacks aren't. The market is wide open and Blacks aren't making any moves. It's just like the music, fashion, and sports industry. Black people are obviously entertaining, and our entertainment makes OTHER PEOPLE rich.

Why are Blacks not smart enough to make themselves rich with their own creative talent?

That is the real issue here, not some white boy fantasy slave flick. Not that I'm defending Tarantino here, as I never really cared for any of his movies before this one, I'm just trying to highlight the real priorities.
IkeLike wrote:
<quoted text>
In my opinion, all Black people have an obligation to guard and protect their history. If they start accepting versions of their history that is not accurate or that is trivialized then as a people they are abandoning their history and giving it up to who ever wants to make a movie or write a book about for profit.
Of course they are. Blacks in this country have no real standards about how other people depict them, which is why you see all manner of debauchery on TV nowadays about Blacks on BET, VH1, MTV, and so on, and even if somebody did make something distasteful about Blacks, what would they do about it?

Nothing.

The reason why you have other people making movies about you in the first place is because they don't respect you and Blacks haven't taken the step to really create and influence in American media like we should.

I agree about safeguarding our history, but that isn't going to occur until Blacks start dominating the film industry BEHIND the camera, like all the white folks are doing.

Like I said, my main issue isn't the movie, whether it is lacking in substance or is even disrespectful to Blacks or not. My main gripe is that Black people aren't making movies talking about us and our experiences that are just as good and entertaining and this one.

Why is always only Spike Lee and John Singleton? We should have dozens upon dozens more by now.
Black Deal

United States

#154 Jan 1, 2013
Bakari Neferu wrote:
<quoted text>Yes, but this is America. The culture itself is lacking in substance.

Again, you seem to be blaming symptoms of the real problem here. You say that the movie was not to your liking.

Let's just say it was complete garbage. That is not the real issue.

The issue is that there aren't any Black people out here putting low substance movies like this to shame by making way better movies.

People can make movies like this because Blacks aren't. The market is wide open and Blacks aren't making any moves. It's just like the music, fashion, and sports industry. Black people are obviously entertaining, and our entertainment makes OTHER PEOPLE rich.

Why are Blacks not smart enough to make themselves rich with their own creative talent?

That is the real issue here, not some white boy fantasy slave flick. Not that I'm defending Tarantino here, as I never really cared for any of his movies before this one, I'm just trying to highlight the real priorities.

IkeLike wrote, "<quoted text>
In my opinion, all Black people have an obligation to guard and protect their history. If they start accepting versions of their history that is not accurate or that is trivialized then as a people they are abandoning their history and giving it up to who ever wants to make a movie or write a book about for profit."

Of course they are. Blacks in this country have no real standards about how other people depict them, which is why you see all manner of debauchery on TV nowadays about Blacks on BET, VH1, MTV, and so on, and even if somebody did make something distasteful about Blacks, what would they do about it?

Nothing.

The reason why you have other people making movies about you in the first place is because they don't respect you and Blacks haven't taken the step to really create and influence in American media like we should.

I agree about safeguarding our history, but that isn't going to occur until Blacks start dominating the film industry BEHIND the camera, like all the white folks are doing.

Like I said, my main issue isn't the movie, whether it is lacking in substance or is even disrespectful to Blacks or not. My main gripe is that Black people aren't making movies talking about us and our experiences that are just as good and entertaining and this one.

Why is always only Spike Lee and John Singleton? We should have dozens upon dozens more by now.
Man if you went to Africa for a stay you would come back here with real knowledge to school folks

Visit Africa and walk on land precious to all humanity
Blasian

Charlotte, NC

#155 Jan 1, 2013
IkeLike wrote:
Tarantino has no doubt calculated that if he made a film showing Blacks taking revenge against White racist slave owners, many Black folks would run to the theater to pay money to see it. It did not matter whether or not his film is based on fact. As long as it feeds into the Black revenge theme, and it is full of action, many Black people will praise it as being very entertaining to watch.
This is a formula that appeals to most audiences regardless of color. Its the story of the underdog striking back at his/her oppressors. The question is why should we be any different. What is wrong with being entertained briefly by such a story when other films by white producers have cast us only in stereotypical dies that make white audiences comfortable. While Tarantino did give his white audiences some of those same stereotypes (the Jezebel, the Uncle Tom), he also provided a raw juxataposition of a black man as a heroic icon and a black woman as a loyal and brave figure of strength. To see both is very rare in the film industry. All of the problems of the black community cannot be solved in one film and that isn't his job to do so. However he provided a hero story where the cowboy rode off into the sunset with his woman. Just because the cowboy was black this time doesn't mean the overall theme is cheapened. My man and I enjoyed it. He said it was refreshing to see a man of color as the hero for once because even as an Asian man, he says a person would have to be a fool not to recognize how Hollywood typically casts blacks, asians, and other people of color.
Black Deal

United States

#156 Jan 1, 2013
Blasian wrote:
<quoted text>This is a formula that appeals to most audiences regardless of color. Its the story of the underdog striking back at his/her oppressors. The question is why should we be any different. What is wrong with being entertained briefly by such a story when other films by white producers have cast us only in stereotypical dies that make white audiences comfortable. While Tarantino did give his white audiences some of those same stereotypes (the Jezebel, the Uncle Tom), he also provided a raw juxataposition of a black man as a heroic icon and a black woman as a loyal and brave figure of strength. To see both is very rare in the film industry. All of the problems of the black community cannot be solved in one film and that isn't his job to do so. However he provided a hero story where the cowboy rode off into the sunset with his woman. Just because the cowboy was black this time doesn't mean the overall theme is cheapened. My man and I enjoyed it. He said it was refreshing to see a man of color as the hero for once because even as an Asian man, he says a person would have to be a fool not to recognize how Hollywood typically casts blacks, asians, and other people of color.
Folks bitch but do not want to do what be necessary: own

Plenty of rich black folks can own movie studio instead of others
Blasian

Charlotte, NC

#157 Jan 1, 2013
IkeLike wrote:
<quoted text>
In my opinion, all Black people have an obligation to guard and protect their history. If they start accepting versions of their history that is not accurate or that is trivialized then as a people they are abandoning their history and giving it up to who ever wants to make a movie or write a book about for profit.
This isn't a version of history. Its a fictional story. Also what specific elements would blacks need to guard against in this film? Considering the many themes Tarantino covered in the movie, I thought he was rather brave and I'm not surprised if he isn't recieving more than a few death threats. For instance, I thought it was brilliant that he chose to shine light on the origins of blood sports such as boxing today where poor men or men of color are urged to abuse each other for the entertainment of rich white men. How can you leave the theater without engaging in deep thought about such ideas. I think he did a good job of graphically depicting the horrors of the deep South in a way that denounces them as evil, as seen with his white characters' struggle to comprehend his own race's wickedness, and his black characters' success at fighting back.
Suki

Elmira, NY

#159 Jan 1, 2013
It's a good movie. Spike doesn't know what he's missing, but if he doesn't want to see the film for any reason then that is his choice.

“Cool Like That”

Level 5

Since: May 08

Everywhere

#160 Jan 1, 2013
Suki wrote:
It's a good movie. Spike doesn't know what he's missing, but if he doesn't want to see the film for any reason then that is his choice.
I think Spike Lee will be just fine missing this movie. I will not be seeing it either, and I'll be okay too :-)

To be honest I have not seen a movie in years accept for some older movies I watch from time to time. I am going to seek out independent films to watch to see if there are any interesting up and coming Black film makers out their. I'm sure there are, but most of us don't know about them.

I'm hoping to see a new generation of Black film makers who will create a movement of quality Black films. It has been a long time since there has been a film movement like the French New Wave. We need a Black New Wave film movement.

“Cool Like That”

Level 5

Since: May 08

Everywhere

#161 Jan 1, 2013
Blasian wrote:
<quoted text>This is a formula that appeals to most audiences regardless of color. Its the story of the underdog striking back at his/her oppressors. The question is why should we be any different. What is wrong with being entertained briefly by such a story when other films by white producers have cast us only in stereotypical dies that make white audiences comfortable. While Tarantino did give his white audiences some of those same stereotypes (the Jezebel, the Uncle Tom), he also provided a raw juxataposition of a black man as a heroic icon and a black woman as a loyal and brave figure of strength. To see both is very rare in the film industry. All of the problems of the black community cannot be solved in one film and that isn't his job to do so. However he provided a hero story where the cowboy rode off into the sunset with his woman. Just because the cowboy was black this time doesn't mean the overall theme is cheapened. My man and I enjoyed it. He said it was refreshing to see a man of color as the hero for once because even as an Asian man, he says a person would have to be a fool not to recognize how Hollywood typically casts blacks, asians, and other people of color.
I respect your opinion on this. I will not be seeing this movie because I'm not interested in it at all. However, I am inspired to write my own stories (short stories, novels, screenplays), and I would love to work with some Black film directors some day.

I figure if I don't like what I see coming out of Hollywood these days, I might as well write the kind of stories I do like. Given some Black people's response to this Django movie, I can tell Black people are hungry for films about them. I know I can write a much better story than Django, and I can find a quality Black director who can help me make a film. If I can't find a director, I'll do it myself.

Level 3

Since: Nov 12

Memphis, TN

#162 Jan 1, 2013
Blasian wrote:
I saw it. I liked it. It dealt with some very real issues in our history in a way that was graphic and brutal. It managed to make you uncomfortable at times and justified at times as well. To its credit, it managed to glorify the spirit of loyalty and love the REAL black men and black women have for each other in spite of the hopeless circumstances of that time.
Its a love story set against a backdrop of intense hopelessness and cruelty. Its also a story that grapples with the question of whether a white and a black could ever have a true friendship in spite of the circumstances. I liked it because the black man rode off into the sunset with his black queen.
I disliked that it took a white man to give us such a story.
The sad part about it, if a BLACK man had of done this film. He would have never portrayed the characters especially the female characters in such a great light. His self-hatred would of come through, and eventually ruined the film
Anonymous

Charlotte, NC

#163 Jan 1, 2013
sweetgirl102 wrote:
<quoted text>
The sad part about it, if a BLACK man had of done this film. He would have never portrayed the characters especially the female characters in such a great light. His self-hatred would of come through, and eventually ruined the film
I would like to believe better of our race than that! If it were some of these loony bins like "Yup" then you'd probably be right and the cowboy would be riding off into the sunset with a white woman, while he left his other women on the plantation.
But I think most sane black men and women would jump at the chance to depict black love in a positive light. Special emphasis on the word "SANE"
Anonymous

Charlotte, NC

#164 Jan 1, 2013
IkeLike wrote:
<quoted text>
I respect your opinion on this. I will not be seeing this movie because I'm not interested in it at all. However, I am inspired to write my own stories (short stories, novels, screenplays), and I would love to work with some Black film directors some day.
I figure if I don't like what I see coming out of Hollywood these days, I might as well write the kind of stories I do like. Given some Black people's response to this Django movie, I can tell Black people are hungry for films about them. I know I can write a much better story than Django, and I can find a quality Black director who can help me make a film. If I can't find a director, I'll do it myself.
I eagerly anticipate your efforts and I completely understand your frustration with the myopic depictions of blacks in Hollywood. While I'm in no way content with Tarantino's efforts, I will give him credit where it is due.
However, I know that you and many others could give us far better illustrations of the rich history of those of African descent.
Dare I even dream of films where blacks branch out into fantasy as well?
Unique2

Macon, GA

#165 Jan 1, 2013
'Django Unchained' was a good a$$ movie. It's action packed, humorous and romantic.

“Sexy & Independent”

Since: Dec 12

Location hidden

#166 Jan 1, 2013
Unique2 wrote:
'Django Unchained' was a good a$$ movie. It's action packed, humorous and romantic.
Mos Def. I will definitely check it out.
Unique2

Macon, GA

#167 Jan 1, 2013
Halle Berry Sister wrote:
<quoted text>
Mos Def. I will definitely check it out.
You won't be disappointed. There isn't a dull moment in the entire film.

“Sexy & Independent”

Since: Dec 12

Location hidden

#168 Jan 1, 2013
Unique2 wrote:
<quoted text>
You won't be disappointed. There isn't a dull moment in the entire film.
That is what I keep hearing. I really look forward to seeing it. The movie theaters in California are really expensive. If I am going to watch a movie it definitely needs to be worth it. My friends and I will check it out.

Level 7

Since: Jul 08

Location hidden

#169 Jan 1, 2013
IkeLike wrote:
<quoted text>
I respect your opinion on this. I will not be seeing this movie because I'm not interested in it at all. However, I am inspired to write my own stories (short stories, novels, screenplays), and I would love to work with some Black film directors some day.
I figure if I don't like what I see coming out of Hollywood these days, I might as well write the kind of stories I do like. Given some Black people's response to this Django movie, I can tell Black people are hungry for films about them. I know I can write a much better story than Django, and I can find a quality Black director who can help me make a film. If I can't find a director, I'll do it myself.
I would be interested to see the outcome of your project. There can never be too many good ideas.

I just got back from seeing Django. I tend to agree with Blasian's commentary. Well done and tackled some tough issues. There were scenes in the movie that made people visibly uncomfortable, which was good. If it makes people think, I'm all for that.
happy

Brooklyn, NY

#170 Jan 1, 2013
Crusher wrote:
Spike Lee has come out against the movie, stating that it "Disrespects (his) ancestors", even though he hasn't even seen the movie...
How the hell can you make that kind of serious judgement if you haven't even seen the film yet?
Sometimes a title can tell many stories; in addition, to many AA any movie in reference to slavery can be very painful to view. No differernt than jewish ppl and the holocust; or the native americans and their homeland America taken from them; as well as the japanese during hiroshima being bombed by americans perhapes...he didn't have to see it. Spike Lee, is a known name in hollywood, and can get word of mouth (sorta speak) on many things before the public does.
Gotta respect his feelings.

“Africa”

Level 7

Since: Jan 12

Oakland

#171 Jan 1, 2013
Director defends Tarantino:

Director Antoine Fuqua has defended Quentin Tarantino over Spike Lee's allegations his new film Django Unchained is "disrespectful" to African-American history.

In a recent interview with editors at Vibe magazine, Lee took aim at Tarantino's new movie, which focuses on a freed slave, played by Jamie Foxx, who seeks revenge on an evil plantation owner.

Fuqua has now addressed the Malcolm X moviemaker's remarks, insisting Lee should have privately approached Tarantino if he had an issue with the project.

"If you disagree with the way a colleague did something, call him up, invite him out for a coffee, talk about it. But don't do it publicly," he told The Hollywood Reporter.
"I'm good friends with Jamie Foxx and he wouldn't have anything to do with a film that had anything racist to it."

http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/entertainmen...

“"Class, the #1 Motivator"”

Level 8

Since: Aug 09

Location hidden

#172 Jan 1, 2013
DerekJ wrote:
<quoted text>
I would be interested to see the outcome of your project. There can never be too many good ideas.
I just got back from seeing Django. I tend to agree with Blasian's commentary. Well done and tackled some tough issues. There were scenes in the movie that made people visibly uncomfortable, which was good. If it makes people think, I'm all for that.
What up Derek J....holla at a playa....hahahahaha....its gettin' clean up in here...started a new thread...this may be right up your alley...I call it the "Brngthtrth2u" thread....it kills the "milk duds" and puts the words to proof!....
Just getting started with it...feel free to jump on it and put a picture to their forehead...best explanation ever.....here's the link...

http://www.topix.com/forum/afam/TUDH8JPJRO5EH...

Stay up hometeam....Happy New Year!

Level 7

Since: Jul 08

Location hidden

#173 Jan 1, 2013
happy wrote:
<quoted text>
Sometimes a title can tell many stories; in addition, to many AA any movie in reference to slavery can be very painful to view. No differernt than jewish ppl and the holocust; or the native americans and their homeland America taken from them; as well as the japanese during hiroshima being bombed by americans perhapes...he didn't have to see it. Spike Lee, is a known name in hollywood, and can get word of mouth (sorta speak) on many things before the public does.
Gotta respect his feelings.
I respect his opinion though I disagree with his conclusion. I found nothing disrespectful about the movie. The brutal treatment of black people during slavery was on full display in the film. It was ugly and uncomfortable but told in a way that was digestible for the masses. I was taught never to shy away from the uncomfortable or the unpleasant but rather to stare it in the face, learn from it and draw strength from it.

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