Django Unchained

“It really don't matter”

Level 4

Since: Jan 12

Location hidden

#324 Jan 11, 2013
"In 1852, Frederick Douglass published The Heroic Slave. A novel about an enslaved African who attempts to rescue his wife from enslavement then leads a successful revolt on a slave ship."

"In 1861, Martin Delany published the novel Blake or the Huts of America. Blake is about an enslaved African who, after his wife is sold into enslavement in the Caribbean, organizes an armed Black revolution. In the course of his travels, he organizes freedom fighters in the US South, Western Africa, and the Caribbean."

"Both of these novels were written when slavery was the law of the land"

http://blackagendareport.com/content/few-thou...

“Africa”

Level 7

Since: Jan 12

Oakland

#325 Jan 11, 2013
IkeLike wrote:
<quoted text>
Actually, Django is a piece of crap that some Black people are swallowing, and that is sad.
Actually, you're just a hater hating on the fact that a white boy made a modern film about Black dominance over whites while pitiful Black filmmakers were sitting on their ass, and mad that Black people actually responded positively to it.

Black filmmakers don't pay homage to Black historical events, or historical Black literature, so whose to blame that a white boy felt the need to make a movie like this? He saw a void that Blacks were unwilling to fill, and he capitalized off it and made bookoo money from it.

Now there's another white boy about to make another film about slavery based of a self narrative of an actual enslaved Black man.

Black filmmakers simply don't get tired of seeing white people profit off of Black peoples' own stories.

If you're going to go around whining and hating, you should target those whines and that hatred towards impotent Black filmmakers, not some movie that everybody has been waiting for for decades that Black filmmakers have neglected to deliver.
motts

Kingston Upon Thames, UK

#326 Jan 11, 2013
IkeLike wrote:
<quoted text>
Actually, Django is a piece of crap that some Black people are swallowing, and that is sad.
'Django' is an '18' rated movie which has made over $100m in 2 weeks, with many great reviews. That doesn't sound like crap to me.
Slap That Butt

Sheffield, UK

#327 Jan 11, 2013
I liked the Color Purple, Whoopee's character kinda turned me on, I woulda humped the shit out of her if I could.
Slap That Butt

Sheffield, UK

#328 Jan 11, 2013
PS I don't know if any of you boys actually noticed the Wagner reference and the nod to German mythology at the core of the film.....
Slap That Butt

Sheffield, UK

#329 Jan 11, 2013
....at the core of Dongo Unchained, that is....
trollslayer

Park Forest, IL

#330 Jan 11, 2013
Bakari Neferu wrote:
<quoted text>
Actually, you're just a hater hating on the fact that a white boy made a modern film about Black dominance over whites while pitiful Black filmmakers were sitting on their ass, and mad that Black people actually responded positively to it.
Black filmmakers don't pay homage to Black historical events, or historical Black literature, so whose to blame that a white boy felt the need to make a movie like this? He saw a void that Blacks were unwilling to fill, and he capitalized off it and made bookoo money from it.
Now there's another white boy about to make another film about slavery based of a self narrative of an actual enslaved Black man.
Black filmmakers simply don't get tired of seeing white people profit off of Black peoples' own stories.
If you're going to go around whining and hating, you should target those whines and that hatred towards impotent Black filmmakers, not some movie that everybody has been waiting for for decades that Black filmmakers have neglected to deliver.
I wonder if somewhere, Gordon Parks is spinning in his grave LOL
_________

If black film would get off their azzes like back in the 70's, maybe we wouldn't be having these discussions now. That's 4 u 2 Spike.

Level 3

Since: Jan 13

Saint Paul, MN

#331 Jan 11, 2013
Much hullabaloo has been made recently about slavery as entertainment in movies like “Django Unchained.” But lost in the discussion is slavery as history, and the simple fact that it was an economic system which seized the economic know-how of Africans in order to construct unimaginable wealth in North America, Europe and throughout the Western Hemisphere. Wealth from the slave trade took Western Europe from being one of the world’s poorest regions to its wealthiest and most powerful in under a century.

Though sadistic and macabre, the plain truth is that slavery was an unprecedented economic juggernaut whose impact is still lived by each of us daily. Consequently, here’s my top-10 list of things everyone should know about the economic roots of slavery.

1) Slavery laid the foundation for the modern international economic system.
The massive infrastructure required to move 8 to 10 million Africans halfway around the world built entire cities in England and France, such as Liverpool, Manchester and Bordeaux. It was key to London’s emergence as a global capital of commerce, and spurred New York’s rise as a center of finance. The industry to construct, fund, staff, and administer the thousands of ships which made close to 50,000 individual voyages was alone a herculean task. The international financial and distribution networks required to coordinate, maintain and profit from slavery set the framework for the modern global economy.

2) Africans’ economic skills were a leading reason for their enslavement.
Africans possessed unique expertise which Europeans required to make their colonial ventures successful. Africans knew how to grow and cultivate crops in tropical and semi-tropical climates. African rice growers, for instance, were captured in order to bring their agricultural knowledge to America’s sea islands and those of the Caribbean. Many West African civilizations possessed goldsmiths and expert metal workers on a grand scale. These slaves were snatched to work in Spanish and Portuguese gold and silver mines throughout Central and South America. Contrary to the myth of unskilled labor, large numbers of Africans were anything but.

3) African know-how transformed slave economies into some of the wealthiest on the planet.
The fruits of the slave trade funded the growth of global empires. The greatest source of wealth for imperial France was the “white gold” of sugar produced by Africans in Haiti. More riches flowed to Britain from the slave economy of Jamaica than all of the original American 13 colonies combined. Those resources underwrote the Industrial Revolution and vast improvements in Western Europe’s economic infrastructure.

4) Until it was destroyed by the Civil War, slavery made the American South the richest and most powerful region in America.
Slavery was a national enterprise, but the economic and political center of gravity during the U.S.’s first incarnation as a slave republic was the South. This was true even during the colonial era. Virginia was its richest colony and George Washington was one of its wealthiest people because of his slaves. The majority of the new country’s presidents and Supreme Court justices were Southerners.

However, the invention of the cotton gin took the South’s national economic dominance and transformed it into a global phenomenon. British demand for American cotton, as I have written before, made the southern stretch of the Mississippi River the Silicon Valley of its era. The single largest concentration of America’s millionaires was gathered in plantations along the Mississippi’s banks. The first and only president of the Confederacy—Jefferson Davis—was a Mississippi, millionaire slave holder.
trollslayer

Park Forest, IL

#332 Jan 11, 2013
Slap That Butt wrote:
I liked the Color Purple, Whoopee's character kinda turned me on, I woulda humped the shit out of her if I could.
...well if ur a white guy, I'm sure Whoopee would welcome the oppty.

Level 3

Since: Jan 13

Saint Paul, MN

#333 Jan 11, 2013
5) Defense of slavery, more than taxes, was pivotal to America’s declaration of independence.
The South had long resisted Northern calls to leave the British Empire. That’s because the South sold most of its slave-produced products to Britain and relied on the British Navy to protect the slave trade. But a court case in England changed all of that. In 1775, a British court ruled that slaves could not be held in the United Kingdom against their will. Fearing that the ruling would apply to the American colonies, the Southern planters swung behind the Northern push for greater autonomy. In 1776, one year later, America left its former colonial master. The issue of slavery was so powerful that it changed the course of history.

6) The brutalization and psychological torture of slaves was designed to ensure that plantations stayed in the black financially.
Slave revolts and acts of sabotage were relatively common on Southern plantations. As economic enterprises, the disruption in production was bad for business. Over time a system of oppression emerged to keep things humming along. This centered on singling out slaves for public torture who had either participated in acts of defiance or who tended towards noncompliance. In fact, the most recalcitrant slaves were sent to institutions, such as the “Sugar House” in Charleston, S.C., where cruelty was used to elicit cooperation. Slavery’s most inhumane aspects were just another tool to guarantee the bottom line.

7) The economic success of former slaves during Reconstruction led to the rise of the Ku Klux Klan.
In less than 10 years after the end of slavery, blacks created thriving communities and had gained political power—including governorships and Senate seats—across the South. Former slaves, such Atlanta’s Alonzo Herndon, had even become millionaires in the post-war period. But the move towards black economic empowerment had upset the old economic order. Former planters organized themselves into White Citizens Councils and created an armed wing—the Ku Klux Klan—to undermine black economic institutions and to force blacks into sharecropping on unfair terms. Isabel Wilkerson’s Pulitzer Prize-winning book,“The Warmth of Other Suns”, details the targeting of black individuals, as well as entire black communities, for acts of terror whose purpose was to enforce economic apartheid.

Level 3

Since: Jan 13

Saint Paul, MN

#334 Jan 11, 2013
8) The desire to maintain economic oppression is why the South was one of the most anti-tax regions of the nation.
Before the Civil War, the South routinely blocked national infrastructure protects. These plans, focused on Northern and Western states, would have moved non-slave goods to market quickly and cheaply. The South worried that such investments would increase the power of the free-labor economy and hurt their own, which was based on slavery. Moreover, the South was vehemently opposed to taxes even to improve the lives of non-slaveholding white citizens. The first public school in the North, Boston Latin, opened its doors in the mid-1600s. The first public school in the South opened 200 years later. Maintenance of slavery was the South’s top priority to the detriment of everything else.

9) Many firms on Wall Street made fortunes from funding the slave trade.
Investment in slavery was one of the most profitable economic activities throughout most of New York’s 350 year history. Much of the financing for the slave economy flowed through New York banks. Marquee names such as JP Morgan Chase and New York Life all profited greatly from slavery. Lehman Brothers, one of Wall Street’s largest firms until 2008, got its start in the slave economy of Alabama. Slavery was so important to the city that New York was one the most pro-slavery urban municipalities in the North.

10) The wealth gap between whites and blacks, the result of slavery, has yet to be closed.
The total value of slaves, or “property” as they were then known, could exceed $12 million in today’s dollars on the largest plantations. With land, machinery, crops and buildings added in, the wealth of southern agricultural enterprises was truly astronomical. Yet when slavery ended, the people that generated the wealth received nothing.

The country has struggled with the implications of this inequity ever since. With policy changes in Washington since 1865, sometimes this economic gulf has narrowed and sometimes it’s widened, but the economic difference has never been erased. Today, the wealth gap between whites and blacks is the largest recorded since records began to be kept three decades ago.
trollslayer

Park Forest, IL

#335 Jan 11, 2013
motts wrote:
<quoted text>
'Django' is an '18' rated movie which has made over $100m in 2 weeks, with many great reviews. That doesn't sound like crap to me.
IkeLike ....is butt hurt over Blacks not getting hyped up on the documentary..... "Soul Food Junkies". He thinks the majority blacks are to stupid to eat veges & fruits.
Slap That Butt

Sheffield, UK

#338 Jan 11, 2013
All1234 wrote:
Much hullabaloo has been made recently about slavery as entertainment in movies like “Django Unchained.” But lost in the discussion is slavery as history, and the simple fact that it was an economic system which seized the economic know-how of Africans in order to construct unimaginable wealth in North America, Europe and throughout the Western Hemisphere. Wealth from the slave trade took Western Europe from being one of the world’s poorest regions to its wealthiest and most powerful in under a century........
Whilst not disputing the immense wealth and economic boost crated by slavery I must, however, comment on the inaccuracy of certain comments.

"2) Africans’ economic skills were a leading reason for their enslavement.
Africans possessed unique expertise which Europeans required to make their colonial ventures successful. Africans knew how to grow and cultivate crops in tropical and semi-tropical climates. African rice growers, for instance, were captured in order to bring their agricultural knowledge to America’s sea islands and those of the Caribbean. Many West African civilizations possessed goldsmiths and expert metal workers on a grand scale. These slaves were snatched to work in Spanish and Portuguese gold and silver mines throughout Central and South America. Contrary to the myth of unskilled labor, large numbers of Africans were anything but."

The ability of Africans to labour in tropical conditions on the sugar plantations of the Caribbean et cetera was the leading reason for their enslavement.

The idea that Africans with skills relating to the destined economy were captured specifically is entirely false. It is also an impractical suggestion given the relative tribal language barriers between the African suppliers, the captured slaves themselves and the Europeans in the trading forts.
Slavers required strong bodies likely to survive the Atlantic crossing, nothing more.

"it was an economic system which seized the economic know-how of Africans..."

It was an economic system which required a free labour force, it was an economic and agricultural system already in existence before Africans were shipped in any numbers. Africans were deemed more desirable physically to work in the appalling conditions which had already seen off the native Americans when they were enslaved.
Slap That Butt

Sheffield, UK

#339 Jan 11, 2013
trollslayer wrote:
<quoted text>
...well if ur a white guy, I'm sure Whoopee would welcome the oppty.
I'd have banged her when she was younger before the breast reduction operation but as she's got older she looks more and more like man unfortunately.

“Cool Like That”

Level 5

Since: May 08

Everywhere

#340 Jan 11, 2013
Bakari Neferu wrote:
<quoted text>
Actually, you're just a hater hating on the fact that a white boy made a modern film about Black dominance over whites while pitiful Black filmmakers were sitting on their ass, and mad that Black people actually responded positively to it.
Black filmmakers don't pay homage to Black historical events, or historical Black literature, so whose to blame that a white boy felt the need to make a movie like this? He saw a void that Blacks were unwilling to fill, and he capitalized off it and made bookoo money from it.
Now there's another white boy about to make another film about slavery based of a self narrative of an actual enslaved Black man.
Black filmmakers simply don't get tired of seeing white people profit off of Black peoples' own stories.
If you're going to go around whining and hating, you should target those whines and that hatred towards impotent Black filmmakers, not some movie that everybody has been waiting for for decades that Black filmmakers have neglected to deliver.
I could care less that a White man made this garbage of a movie. I would be just as critical of this movie if a Black man or Black woman had made it. Actually I would be even more critical if a Black man or woman had made this trash.

Unlike you, I am not as easily impressed by a fluff piece that uses slavery as gimmick to get Black folks all excited and ready to spend money at the theater. I'm much too smart and savvy to fall for that.

You obviously LOVE this movie because it showed you a fictitious image of a Black man getting revenge over slave masters. It does not matter that it was a fake made up story to you because you just want to be entertained. When it comes to slavery and the history of slavery, I'll take the truth.

“Cool Like That”

Level 5

Since: May 08

Everywhere

#341 Jan 11, 2013
trollslayer wrote:
<quoted text>
IkeLike ....is butt hurt over Blacks not getting hyped up on the documentary..... "Soul Food Junkies". He thinks the majority blacks are to stupid to eat veges & fruits.
I'm glad you mentioned "Soul Food Junkies."
I had a chance to hear the film maker of that film this
morning on the Tom Joyner Morning Show. His name is Byron Hurt,
and he was inspired to make this documentary because of his father's health issues (obesity and pancreatic cancer).

I believe "Soul Food Junkies" comes on this Monday, January 14, 2013 at 9:00 p.m. on the PBS series Independent Lens. It sounds like it will be very informative and interesting to anyone who is
concerned about health issues within the Black community particularly as they relate to diet and food choices as well as
the lack of availability of quality healthy foods in certain neighborhoods.

http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/soul-food-...

“Cool Like That”

Level 5

Since: May 08

Everywhere

#342 Jan 11, 2013
trollslayer wrote:
<quoted text>
IkeLike ....is butt hurt over Blacks not getting hyped up on the documentary..... "Soul Food Junkies". He thinks the majority blacks are to stupid to eat veges & fruits.
By the way you really are an ignorant fool.
You do realize that don't you?

“Africa”

Level 7

Since: Jan 12

Oakland

#343 Jan 11, 2013
IkeLike wrote:
<quoted text>
I could care less that a White man made this garbage of a movie. I would be just as critical of this movie if a Black man or Black woman had made it. Actually I would be even more critical if a Black man or woman had made this trash.
Unlike you, I am not as easily impressed by a fluff piece that uses slavery as gimmick to get Black folks all excited and ready to spend money at the theater. I'm much too smart and savvy to fall for that.
You're too dull and dim is what you are. A gimmick? What kind of senseless argument is that?

Slavery is not what drew people to watch this movie. Vengeance is what drew people to watch this movie.
IkeLike wrote:
You obviously LOVE this movie because it showed you a fictitious image of a Black man getting revenge over slave masters.
Fictitious? I take that back. You're not dull or dim...just dumb.

"Slaves who were pushed to their limits occasionally murdered their masters or overseers."

http://www.learner.org/amerpass/unit07/contex...
IkeLike wrote:
It does not matter that it was a fake made up story to you because you just want to be entertained.
99 percent of all movies are fake, made up stories. That's why they call it FICTION and not DOCUMENTARY. And people who go to see them always go to be entertained.

You said you want to be a screenplay writer? And you don't know this basic stuff?

Ridiculous....
IkeLike wrote:
When it comes to slavery and the history of slavery, I'll take the truth.
And what is the "truth" exactly? That Fredrick Dougless didn't write a novel about this very same subject with basically the same plot centuries ago?

That Slaves never stood up for themselves and pressed Black Boots to White faces in the Antebellum South, or anywhere else for that matter?

That if slavery-themed movies don't make everybody depressed and sad and sh*t, they're garbage?

What is the truth, Sir Savvy?

“Cool Like That”

Level 5

Since: May 08

Everywhere

#344 Jan 11, 2013
Bakari Neferu wrote:
<quoted text>
You're too dull and dim is what you are. A gimmick? What kind of senseless argument is that?
Slavery is not what drew people to watch this movie. Vengeance is what drew people to watch this movie.
<quoted text>
Fictitious? I take that back. You're not dull or dim...just dumb.
"Slaves who were pushed to their limits occasionally murdered their masters or overseers."
http://www.learner.org/amerpass/unit07/contex...
<quoted text>
99 percent of all movies are fake, made up stories. That's why they call it FICTION and not DOCUMENTARY. And people who go to see them always go to be entertained.
You said you want to be a screenplay writer? And you don't know this basic stuff?
Ridiculous....
<quoted text>
And what is the "truth" exactly? That Fredrick Dougless didn't write a novel about this very same subject with basically the same plot centuries ago?
That Slaves never stood up for themselves and pressed Black Boots to White faces in the Antebellum South, or anywhere else for that matter?
That if slavery-themed movies don't make everybody depressed and sad and sh*t, they're garbage?
What is the truth, Sir Savvy?
Why are you on Topix right now?
Why arn't you at the movies watching Django for the 1,000th time. LOL
Guest

Sikeston, MO

#345 Jan 11, 2013
LAcreole wrote:
<quoted text>
Jamie Foxx is a really good actor I must say. I asked if you saw the movie Color Purple because I love that movie. I didn't think it was offensive even though it was produced by a white man. I didn't think it was bias either but just the opposite, just gave you glimpses of the truth. I like the movie Blood diamond also. It even made me think twice about everytime I see a diamond ring how many people may have died over those diamonds. This movie call Time to Kill...that's one movie I can not watch ever again. I've watched it once and it enraged me because of a certain scene in particular. I will try finding the trailer to Django tomorrow to watch. I think it'll be a good movie.
If you want to see a wonderful movie go see/rent Spike Lees "Miracle At Santa Anna" Now that was incredible from the opening minutes!! Bumbler clerks!

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