Black HW Boxing Champions
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#1 May 2, 2013
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Jack Johnson, the first black heavyweight champion, whose reign lasted from 1908 to 1915, was also the first African American pop culture icon. He was photographed more than any other black man of his day and, indeed, more than most white men.

He was written about more as well. Black people during the early 20th century were hardly the subject of news in the white press unless they were the perpetrators of crime or had been lynched (usually for a crime, real or imaginary).

Johnson was different—not only was he written about in black newspapers but he was, during his heyday, not infrequently the subject of front pages of white papers. As his career developed, he was subject of scrutiny from the white press, in part because he was accused and convicted of a crime, but also because he was champion athlete in a sport with a strong national following.

Not even the most famous race leaders of the day, Booker T. Washington, president of Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, and W. E. B. Du Bois, founding member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and editor of that organization's magazine, The Crisis, could claim anywhere near the attention Johnson received.

Not even the most famous black entertainers and artists of the day—musical stage comics George Walker and Bert Walker, or bandleader James Reese Europe, or ragtime composer Scott Joplin, or fiction writer Charles W. Chesnutt, or painter Henry O. Tanner—received Johnson's attention. In fact, it would be safe to say that while Johnson was heavyweight champion, he was covered more in the press than all other notable black men combined...

http://www.pbs.org/unforgivableblackness/rebe...

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#2 May 2, 2013
Excerpt:

Joseph Louis Barrow (May 13, 1914 – April 12, 1981), better known as Joe Louis, was an American professional boxer and the World Heavyweight Champion from 1937 to 1949.

He is considered to be one of the greatest heavyweights of all time. Nicknamed the Brown Bomber, Louis helped elevate boxing from a nadir in popularity in the post-Jack Dempsey era by establishing a reputation as an honest, hardworking fighter at a time when the sport was dominated by gambling interests.[1][2] Louis' championship reign lasted 140 consecutive months, during which he participated in 26 championship fights; a 27th fight, against Ezzard Charles, was a challenge to Charles' Heavyweight title and so is not included in Louis' reign.

All in all, Joe was victorious in 25 successful title defenses, a record for the heavyweight division. In 2005, Louis was ranked as the #1 heavyweight of all-time by the International Boxing Research Organization,[3] and was ranked #1 on The Ring's list of the 100 Greatest Punchers of All-Time.[4]

Louis' cultural impact was felt well outside the ring. He is widely regarded as the first African American to achieve the status of a nationwide hero within the United States, and was also a focal point of anti-Nazi sentiment leading up to and during World War II.[5] He also was instrumental in integrating the game of golf, breaking the sport's color barrier in America by appearing under a sponsor's exemption in a PGA event in 1952.[6]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Louis
muminfreedomfigh ta

Brooklyn, NY

#3 May 2, 2013
Its a shame the way the gov't and i.r.s. did joe louis that was part of the reason he had to fight when he was clearly to old to be in the ring.

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#4 May 2, 2013
muminfreedomfighta wrote:
Its a shame the way the gov't and i.r.s. did joe louis that was part of the reason he had to fight when he was clearly to old to be in the ring.
It is.

Since: May 10

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#5 May 2, 2013
Arnold Raymond Cream (January 31, 1914 – February 25, 1994), better known as Jersey Joe Walcott, was a world heavyweight boxing champion. He broke the world's record for the oldest man to win the world's Heavyweight title when he earned it at the age of 37 years, 168 days.

That record would eventually be broken on November 5, 1994, by 45 year old George Foreman, who defeated the 26 year old Heavyweight champion of the world Michael Moorer, to win the WBA and IBF heavyweight titles.

Background

Walcott was born in Pensauken, New Jersey. His father was an immigrant from St. Thomas, his mother was born in Jordantown, a small village in Pennsauken, New Jersey. Walcott's father died when he was 15 years old, so he quit school and took a job working in a soup factory to support his mother and 11 siblings. He also began training as a boxer. He took the name of his boxing idol, Joe Walcott, the welterweight champion from Barbados and added the "Jersey" as a way to distinguish himself and let eveyone know where he was from.

Boxing career

He debuted as a professional boxer on September 9, 1930, fighting Cowboy Wallace and winning by a knockout in round one. After five straight knockout wins, in 1933, he lost for the first time, beaten on points by Henry Wilson in Philadelphia.

He built a record of 45 wins, 11 losses and 1 draw before challenging for the world title for the first time. Walcott lost early bouts against world-class competition. He lost a pair of fights to Tiger Jack Fox and was knocked out by contender Abe Simon. But that would change in 1945 when Walcott beat top heavyweights such as Joe Baksi, Lee Q. Murray, Curtis Sheppard and Jimmy Bivins. He closed out 1946 with a pair of losses to former light heavyweight champ Joey Maxim and heavyweight contender Elmer Ray, but promptly avenged those defeats in 1947.

On December 5, 1947, he fought Joe Louis, at thirty three years of age breaking the record as the oldest man to fight for the world heavyweight title. Despite dropping Louis in round one, and once again in round four, he lost a 15 round split decision. Most ringside observers and boxing writers felt Walcott deserved the win, and so there was a rematch on June 25, 1948, when Louis prevailed once again, this time by a knockout in round 11.

June 22 of 1949, Walcott got another chance to become world heavyweight champion, when he and Ezzard Charles met for the title left vacant by Louis. However, Charles prevailed, winning by decision in 15 rounds. Walcott, disappointed but eager to see his dream of being a champion come true, went on, and in 1950, he won four of his five bouts, including a three round knock-out of future world light heavyweight champion Harold Johnson.

On March 7, 1951, he and Charles fought for a second time and once again Charles won a 15 round decision to retain his world title. But on July 18, he joined a handful of boxers who claimed the world title in their fifth try, when he knocked out Charles in seven rounds in Pittsburgh, to finally become world's heavyweight champion, at the relatively old age of 37.[1]

This made him the oldest man ever to win the world heavyweight crown (a distinction he would hold until George Foreman won the title at age 45 in 1994)....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
muminfreedomfigh ta

United States

#6 May 3, 2013
Brainiac2 wrote:
Arnold Raymond Cream (January 31, 1914 – February 25, 1994), better known as Jersey Joe Walcott, was a world heavyweight boxing champion. He broke the world's record for the oldest man to win the world's Heavyweight title when he earned it at the age of 37 years, 168 days.
That record would eventually be broken on November 5, 1994, by 45 year old George Foreman, who defeated the 26 year old Heavyweight champion of the world Michael Moorer, to win the WBA and IBF heavyweight titles.
Background
Walcott was born in Pensauken, New Jersey. His father was an immigrant from St. Thomas, his mother was born in Jordantown, a small village in Pennsauken, New Jersey. Walcott's father died when he was 15 years old, so he quit school and took a job working in a soup factory to support his mother and 11 siblings. He also began training as a boxer. He took the name of his boxing idol, Joe Walcott, the welterweight champion from Barbados and added the "Jersey" as a way to distinguish himself and let eveyone know where he was from.
Boxing career
He debuted as a professional boxer on September 9, 1930, fighting Cowboy Wallace and winning by a knockout in round one. After five straight knockout wins, in 1933, he lost for the first time, beaten on points by Henry Wilson in Philadelphia.
He built a record of 45 wins, 11 losses and 1 draw before challenging for the world title for the first time. Walcott lost early bouts against world-class competition. He lost a pair of fights to Tiger Jack Fox and was knocked out by contender Abe Simon. But that would change in 1945 when Walcott beat top heavyweights such as Joe Baksi, Lee Q. Murray, Curtis Sheppard and Jimmy Bivins. He closed out 1946 with a pair of losses to former light heavyweight champ Joey Maxim and heavyweight contender Elmer Ray, but promptly avenged those defeats in 1947.
On December 5, 1947, he fought Joe Louis, at thirty three years of age breaking the record as the oldest man to fight for the world heavyweight title. Despite dropping Louis in round one, and once again in round four, he lost a 15 round split decision. Most ringside observers and boxing writers felt Walcott deserved the win, and so there was a rematch on June 25, 1948, when Louis prevailed once again, this time by a knockout in round 11.
June 22 of 1949, Walcott got another chance to become world heavyweight champion, when he and Ezzard Charles met for the title left vacant by Louis. However, Charles prevailed, winning by decision in 15 rounds. Walcott, disappointed but eager to see his dream of being a champion come true, went on, and in 1950, he won four of his five bouts, including a three round knock-out of future world light heavyweight champion Harold Johnson.
On March 7, 1951, he and Charles fought for a second time and once again Charles won a 15 round decision to retain his world title. But on July 18, he joined a handful of boxers who claimed the world title in their fifth try, when he knocked out Charles in seven rounds in Pittsburgh, to finally become world's heavyweight champion, at the relatively old age of 37.[1]
This made him the oldest man ever to win the world heavyweight crown (a distinction he would hold until George Foreman won the title at age 45 in 1994)....
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
37 back then is a lot older than 37 is now. The same thing can be said for 45. In 1994 George Foreman was considered old can you imagine if they had the benefit of modern ways of training,diet and exercise. Look at bernard hopkins even though he is in a lighter weight class late 40'S is still the late 40's.

Since: May 10

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#7 May 3, 2013
Ezzard Mack Charles (July 7, 1921–May 28, 1975) was an American professional boxer and former World Heavyweight Champion.

Charles defeated numerous Hall of Fame fighters in three different weight classes. He retired with a record of 93 wins, 25 losses and 1 draw.

He was born in Lawrenceville, Georgia, but is commonly thought of as a Cincinnatian.[1] Charles graduated from Woodward High School in Cincinnati where he was already becoming a well-known fighter.[2] Known as "The Cincinnati Cobra", Charles fought many notable opponents in both the light heavyweight and heavyweight divisions, eventually winning a championship in the latter. Although he never won the Light Heavyweight title, The Ring has rated him as the greatest light heavyweight of all time.[3]

Charles started his career as a featherweight in the amateurs, where he had a record of 42–0. In 1938, he won the Diamond Belt Middleweight Championship. He followed this up in 1939 by winning the Chicago Golden Gloves tournament of champions. He won the national AAU Middleweight Championship in 1939. He turned pro in 1940, knocking out Melody Johnson in the 4th round. Charles won all of his first 15 fights before being defeated by veteran Ken Overlin. Victories over future Hall of Famers Teddy Yarosz and the much avoided Charley Burley had started to solidify Charles as a top contender in the middleweight division. However, he served in the U.S. military during World War II and was unable to fight professionally in 1945.

He returned to boxing after the war as a light heavyweight, picking up many notable wins over leading light heavyweights, as well as heavyweight contenders Archie Moore, Jimmy Bivins, Lloyd Marshall and Elmer Ray. Shortly after his knock-out of Moore in their third and final meeting, tragedy struck. Charles fought a young contender named Sam Baroudi, knocking him out in Round 10. Baroudi died of the injuries he sustained in this bout. Charles was so devastated he almost gave up fighting. Charles was unable to secure a title shot at light heavyweight and moved up to heavyweight. After knocking out Joe Baksi and Johnny Haynes, Charles won the vacant National Boxing Association World Heavyweight title when he outpointed Jersey Joe Walcott over 15 rounds on June 22, 1949. The following year, he outpointed his idol and former World Heavyweight Champion Joe Louis to become the recognized Lineal Champion. Successful defenses against Walcott, Lee Oma and Joey Maxim would follow.

In 1951, Charles fought Walcott a third time and lost the title by knockout in the seventh round. Charles lost a controversial decision in the fourth and final bout. If Charles had won this fight, he would have become the first man in history to regain the heavyweight championship. Remaining a top contender with wins over Rex Layne, Tommy Harrison and Coley Wallace, Charles knocked out Bob Satterfield in an eliminator bout for the right to challenge Heavyweight Champion Rocky Marciano. His two stirring battles with Marciano are regarded as ring classics....

In 2006, Ezzard Charles was named the 11th greatest fighter of all time by the IBRO (International Boxing Research Organisation).[7]

The "Cincinnati Cobra" was a master boxer of extraordinary skill and ability. He had speed, agility, fast hands and excellent footwork. Charles possessed a masterful jab and was a superb combination puncher. He was at his peak as a light-heavyweight. His record is quite impressive.

Against top rate opposition like Archie Moore, Charley Burley, Lloyd Marshall, Jimmy Bivins, and Joey Maxim he was an impressive 16-2 combined. Despite being a natural light-heavy he won the heavyweight title and made 9 successful title defenses. Nearly 25% of voters had Charles in the top 10. Half of the voters had him in the top 15. Two thirds of voters had him inside the top 20.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ezzard_Charles

Since: May 10

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#8 May 3, 2013
muminfreedomfighta wrote:
<quoted text>37 back then is a lot older than 37 is now. The same thing can be said for 45. In 1994 George Foreman was considered old can you imagine if they had the benefit of modern ways of training,diet and exercise. Look at bernard hopkins even though he is in a lighter weight class late 40'S is still the late 40's.
I think Bern is aiming for the 50! Might just make it.

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#9 May 3, 2013
Name: Sonny Liston
Birth Name: Charles L. Liston
Born: 1930-07-22
Birthplace: Johnson Township, Arkansas, USA
Died: 1970-12-30 (Age:40)
Nationality: US American
Hometown: Saint Louis, Missouri, USA
Stance: Orthodox
Height: 6&#8242; 0½&#8243; / 184cm
Reach: 84&#8243; / 213cm

Liston began his professional career with a first-round knockout of Don Smith and built up a nine fight winning streak against mainly unremarkable opposition. He made his debut on national television against Johnny Summerlin, winning a decision after eight rounds.

He was handed his first defeat by awkward journeyman Marty Marshall on September 7, 1954. While laughing at his opponent's unorthodox ring tactics, Liston was caught by a Marshall right hand and suffered a broken jaw, but still lasted the distance, losing on an eighth-round split decision.

He met Marshall again seven months later, on April 21, 1955, and won by a sixth-round TKO after flooring Marshall four times. Liston won their rubber match on March 6, 1956 by a lopsided ten-round unanimous decision to extend his record to 14-1. However, a few months later he was sentenced to nine months imprisonment for assaulting a police officer and banned from boxing for the whole of 1957.

Heavyweight Contender

Following his release from prison, Liston embarked on an rigorous campaign starting in 1958 which would see him level the entire heavyweight division and become the only logical contender to champion Floyd Patterson's crown. But it would be four years before Liston finally earned a shot at the title, with Patterson's handlers citing Liston's links to organized crime as a reason to avoid the match-up.

Liston knocked out some of the best heavyweights of the late 1950s and early 1960s: Nino Valdes (KO 3), Wayne Bethea (TKO 1), Zora Folley (KO 3), Mike DeJohn (TKO 6), Roy Harris (TKO 1), Albert Westphal (KO 1), and the hard-punching Cleveland Williams twice in classic slugfests (TKO3 and TKO2).

The only opponents to last the distance were Eddie Machen and Bert Whitehurst (the latter managed the feat twice, but was knocked through the ropes in the final ten seconds of their second bout), although both adopted ultra-cautious tactics and Liston won comfortably on points. Finally, after years of pressure, Patterson defied his manager, Cus D'Amato, and signed to fight Liston.

World Heavyweight Champion

Liston and Patterson finally met in the ring on September 25, 1962 in Chicago, Illinois. Once the bell rang, it soon became clear that Patterson lacked the strength and power to keep Liston away. Liston pinned Patterson on the ropes in the first round and felled the champion with a series of blows to the head. Patterson was unable to beat the count, and the bout was over at 2:05 of the opening stanza.

Liston was the new World Heavyweight Champion. They had a rematch on July 22, 1963, and Patterson was able to last just four seconds longer. Liston won by a knockout at 2:09 of the first round.

At around the same time, a brash and talented young heavyweight named Cassius Clay emerged onto the boxing scene. In his bid to earn a title shot, Clay christened Liston a "big, ugly bear" and left bear traps outside his house. The bout took place on February 15, 1964. Despite Liston entering the ring as an 8-1 favorite, the quick and agile Clay proved an elusive target. Liston struggled to land clean blows, while Clay scored with quick combinations. After six rounds, it was all over. Liston, claiming an injured shoulder, failed to answer the bell for the seventh round, handing Clay the championship.

The rematch between Liston and Clay (by then known as Muhammad Ali) took place on May 25, 1965. It is among the most controversial bouts in boxing history. Less than two minutes into the fight, Liston was felled by a right hand thrown by Ali...

Post Championship...

http://boxrec.com/media/index.php/Sonny_Listo...
muminfreedomfigh ta

United States

#10 May 3, 2013
I think i heard recently that sonny liston was ordered by the mob to throw the fight. After that fight his career was over. I makes you wonder how much money was involved.

Level 8

Since: Jan 11

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#11 May 3, 2013
the golden age of boxing is over. Boxing is now a "fringe" sport. How many black guys do you all know PERSONALLY who box, even in the amateurs? I don't know any. But I do know a lotta brothers who play football and basketball and soccer. That's where all the talent from the heavyweight boxing pool has gone. If guys like ray lewis, shaq, vince carter, kevin garnett, lebron, etc, had been boxers, there would be no such thing as the klitchko brothers. black men just don't go for boxing anymore. That's why these days, every time you see a black heavyweight prospect on tv, he's usually an ex-football player who couldn't make it in that sport and turned to boxing late.
Enki

Jacksonville, FL

#12 May 3, 2013
Desmond Sandiford wrote:
the golden age of boxing is over. Boxing is now a "fringe" sport. How many black guys do you all know PERSONALLY who box, even in the amateurs? I don't know any. But I do know a lotta brothers who play football and basketball and soccer. That's where all the talent from the heavyweight boxing pool has gone. If guys like ray lewis, shaq, vince carter, kevin garnett, lebron, etc, had been boxers, there would be no such thing as the klitchko brothers. black men just don't go for boxing anymore. That's why these days, every time you see a black heavyweight prospect on tv, he's usually an ex-football player who couldn't make it in that sport and turned to boxing late.
Excellent breakdown Desmond never thought of it that way...

Since: May 10

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#13 May 3, 2013
Desmond Sandiford wrote:
the golden age of boxing is over. Boxing is now a "fringe" sport. How many black guys do you all know PERSONALLY who box, even in the amateurs? I don't know any. But I do know a lotta brothers who play football and basketball and soccer. That's where all the talent from the heavyweight boxing pool has gone. If guys like ray lewis, shaq, vince carter, kevin garnett, lebron, etc, had been boxers, there would be no such thing as the klitchko brothers....
Bringing race into it encourages white racists to retaliate.
Joe Cool

San Diego, CA

#14 May 4, 2013
It is amazing how many great black boxers are out there but don't put those Russian guys down, they are champions because they beat everyone in the weight class just like everybody before them. Another reason that there are not so many great heavyweight boxers in America is because there is a lot of opportunity to make money without taking punches to the head.
muminfreedomfigh ta

United States

#15 May 4, 2013
Brainiac2 wrote:
<quoted text>
Bringing race into it encourages white racists to retaliate.
Your right because then this will turn into the same nonsense jack johnson had to hear so i agree. I think it is about who is the best at
a particular time. Black or white you gotta lace'em up and get in the ring.

Level 8

Since: Jan 11

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#16 May 4, 2013
Brainiac2 wrote:
<quoted text>
Bringing race into it encourages white racists to retaliate.
so who gives a sh8t if they retaliate? sounds like you scared...how old are you?...i'm tellin the honest truth about boxing and you worried about white people's feeins. the reason you don't see anymore heavyweight boxing championship fights is because, first of all there's no talent out there and secondly, because the klitchko brothers are terrible to watch. They suck. and if there was any halfway decent black fighters out there, the klitchkos would have been relegated to the garbage heap of boxing history a long time ago.

Level 8

Since: Jan 11

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#17 May 4, 2013
Joe Cool wrote:
It is amazing how many great black boxers are out there but don't put those Russian guys down, they are champions because they beat everyone in the weight class just like everybody before them. Another reason that there are not so many great heavyweight boxers in America is because there is a lot of opportunity to make money without taking punches to the head.
lol....it's very gracious how black people want to give credit to the klitchkos. but the reality is, the heavyweight division is the weakest it's ever been since organized professional boxing started. You have a buncha 50 year ole retreads like rahman and tony the tiger and that's like the best black heavyweights out there. in fact, the best black heavyweight these days is really a cruiserweight named david haye. haye beat the russian giant valuev. but at 6 foot 2 haye is too small to compete effectively against the 6 foot 6 and 6 foot 7 klitchko brothers. The klitchkos are basically able to hold onto the titles because there is literally NO competition of note out there...not because they can fight.

now that dude that beat up cristobal arreola the other day might be able to take them out even though he started boxing late and he's already 34 and obese, but that's an indication of just how destitute the heavyweight division is.

Level 8

Since: Jan 11

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#18 May 4, 2013
Enki wrote:
<quoted text>
Excellent breakdown Desmond never thought of it that way...
thanks. there was a study done a few years back about boxing and what they found was that a lotta local boxing programs had been defunded and that boxers are not recruited like they used to be. part of the campaign to delegitimize boxing and also because of certain boxers and the officiating that cast boxing in a negative light and turned people off from the sport. So, unlike back in the day when you had guys like sugar ray leonard, and sweet pea whitaker and even floyd mayweather, jr, today's boxers have a much harder time getting the amateur experience and grooming they need which discourages interest in the sport.

“War is the father of all”

Level 4

Since: Oct 12

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#19 May 4, 2013
Blacks have to make such lists because they're sorely missing in any other field, especially a serious one, not just entertainment like sports.

1. out of 100+ sports disciplines, Blacks are prominent in 2-3. Never or just a few of them in motor sports, tennis, soccer, mixed martial arts, skiing, hockey, power lifting, cycling, gymnastics, water polo, swimming, handball, pentathlon,.

2. but- this is just entertainment. What about:

+ military accomplishments (generals,..)
+ science accomplishments
+ visual art accomplishments
+ music accomplishments (don't make me laugh with moronic black "music")
+ literary accomplishments
+ philosophy accomplishments
+ technology accomplishments
+ social engineering accomplishments
+....

Only Injuns and Eskimos are less developed.

Level 8

Since: Jan 11

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#22 May 4, 2013
Temudjin wrote:
Blacks have to make such lists because they're sorely missing in any other field, especially a serious one, not just entertainment like sports.
1. out of 100+ sports disciplines, Blacks are prominent in 2-3. Never or just a few of them in motor sports, tennis, soccer, mixed martial arts, skiing, hockey, power lifting, cycling, gymnastics, water polo, swimming, handball, pentathlon,.
2. but- this is just entertainment. What about:
+ military accomplishments (generals,..)
+ science accomplishments
+ visual art accomplishments
+ music accomplishments (don't make me laugh with moronic black "music")
+ literary accomplishments
+ philosophy accomplishments
+ technology accomplishments
+ social engineering accomplishments
+....
Only Injuns and Eskimos are less developed.
blacks have excelled in all those areas and contributed more to humanity than whites. Not only that, but blacks are physically superior to whites in every way...this is because blacks are genetically superior to whites. Your own fox news reported that a couple of years ago.

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