BLACK VALUES TODAY: What ARE THEY?

BLACK VALUES TODAY: What ARE THEY?

Posted in the African-American Forum

First Prev
of 3
Next Last

“Yes WE Can! Yes we Will!”

Level 8

Since: Jul 07

Baltimore, Md.

#1 Feb 9, 2013
"What do men LIVE for?" queried CLR James in his classic BEYOND A BOUNDARY. To what do human beings aspire?
In the second week of Black History Month, it seems quite fitting that we Black folk examine the values by which we live.
Indeed, what are our values? And what is the WORTH of our values?

For better or worst, they have surely changed over time.
In his 1903 classic, THE SOULS OF BLACK FOLK, W.E.B Du Bois offers the following observation and reflection:

"In the Black World, the Preacher and the Teacher embodied once the ideals of this people--the strife for another and JUSTER world, the vague dream of righteousness,the mystery of KNOWING; but today the danger is that these ideals, with their simple beauty and weird inspiration, will suddenly sink into a quest for CASH and a LUST for GOLD."

Now one need not idealize preachers or teachers to discern Du Bois' meaning or the importance of his message.
The preacher SYMBOLIZED the striving for justice; and at his best he (sometimes she)was a PROPHETIC voice. LIke the Hebrew prophets his was a voice of deliverance. A more witness on behalf of justice for an oppressed people. Dr. King was certainly that, but he was not the first or last.
The teacher symbolized the critical temper, the spirit of inquiry, the desire to know and to liberate the mind. Aristotle wrote that all men have a sense of wonder and a desire to know.
For the Blacks, long subject to ENFORCED ignorance and illiteracy, the right to know, think and learn was part of the meaning of freedom, of deliverance. Once upon a time EDUCATION was nearly a religion for most Black folk. And the teacher represented the critical temper, the Socratic spirit even as te preacher represented the prophtic spirit.
In a sense, it is not so much this or that preacher of teacher who was important, but the VALUES for which they stood (even when they didn't consistently live by them).
Ah, but how long would this be so? Have not our lives been undermined by the posionous ethos of consumerism?

Have we not reduced ourselves, our primary goals in life, to a sordid quest for cash. Not simply, as makes sense, sufficient material well being to be able to enjoy a freer life where the finer things--things of the spirit come first---but rather a way of life in which the quest for THINGS, money and trinkets become the BE-ALL and END-ALL of life?
Is this what we've come to?(Can you imagine our parents and grandparents shooting each other over a pair of sneakers?)

What are our values, Black people? What do we live for? To what do we aspire
Bubba

Louisville, KY

#2 Feb 9, 2013
Black values = rap music, blame whitey, and baggy pants.
happy

Brooklyn, NY

#3 Feb 9, 2013
Bubba wrote:
Black values = rap music, blame whitey, and baggy pants.
Even a 48, 50, 60, year old African American??? An azz-n-a-hole married to a TROLL for sure, can only state such foolishness; NONSENSE. Smh
happy

Brooklyn, NY

#4 Feb 9, 2013
Bubba wrote:
Black values = rap music, blame whitey, and baggy pants.
So called blamed whitey (some) insist to hang on to stero-types adorning self for blame.

“Yes WE Can! Yes we Will!”

Level 8

Since: Jul 07

Baltimore, Md.

#6 Feb 9, 2013
It was in 1903 that Du Bois wrote that the danger the old ideals of knowing and righteousness would sink into a quest for cash and a lust for gold.
At that time it was a DANGER. Has that danger now become reality for many?

Du Bois wondered: "What if the Negro people be wooed from a strife for righteousness, from a love of knowing, to regard DOLLARS as the be-all and end-all of life?"

Have not far too many of us been so wooed already? And with disastrous consequences for our personal and social lives?

Or do we still maintain a spiritual core?

“Yes WE Can! Yes we Will!”

Level 8

Since: Jul 07

Baltimore, Md.

#7 Feb 10, 2013
I would like to see posts by sisters and brothers who seriously want to engage in a discussion and critique of our VALUES.
Masud_S_Hoghughi __

Netherlands

#8 Feb 10, 2013
...niccuz r very materialistic animals..........
Harold_Darvey

Naples, FL

#9 Feb 10, 2013
I see far too much emphasis on style: fashion, cars, gadgets, and not enough attention paid to family, home and education.

I'm moderately successful, but driving through the hood, it's hard not to be struck by expensive cars -- much nicer than I would shell out money for -- sitting in front of mere tenements and slums with overdressed folks milling about with seemingly nothing to do.

That seems a priority way out of whack to me.

The FIRST concern of any parent should be to provide an environment that is safe and most of all NURTURING to a curious young mind, and instill in them a sense of drive to learn and better themselves.

I think we are failing our children when we let the streets raise them. With a few notable exceptions (celebrities), that kind of environment rarely produces anything worthwhile.
Phoenix

Humble, TX

#10 Feb 10, 2013
LAcreole wrote:
What an oxymoron...
I don't believe that.

People just need to repent and turn to God.

“Yes WE Can! Yes we Will!”

Level 8

Since: Jul 07

Baltimore, Md.

#11 Feb 10, 2013
Harold_Darvey wrote:
I see far too much emphasis on style: fashion, cars, gadgets, and not enough attention paid to family, home and education.
I'm moderately successful, but driving through the hood, it's hard not to be struck by expensive cars -- much nicer than I would shell out money for -- sitting in front of mere tenements and slums with overdressed folks milling about with seemingly nothing to do.
That seems a priority way out of whack to me.
The FIRST concern of any parent should be to provide an environment that is safe and most of all NURTURING to a curious young mind, and instill in them a sense of drive to learn and better themselves.
I think we are failing our children when we let the streets raise them. With a few notable exceptions (celebrities), that kind of environment rarely produces anything worthwhile.
This is true not only in the hood, but everywhere. We judge ourselves and each other by the size of our wallets, the quantiies of our trinkets, and our so-called "status." Consuerism, acquisitiveness and possessive individualism erodes our moral core and community life. When I talk to my middle class students about their aims in education, for most it's about making more money or achieving greater status. Not about an intense spiritual search for values, or the pursuit of knowledge, or social justice and the uplifting of community.
Dr. King was right: We need a REVOLUTION OF VALUES. Malcolm X was right: WE need a CULTURAL REVOLUTION to de-brainwash our people.(Frankly, whites need this too. But it's OUR PEOPLE that I'm speaking of now).
auntie bee

United States

#12 Feb 10, 2013
what?, smash as many mickey dees and kfc windows as possible?

“Yes WE Can! Yes we Will!”

Level 8

Since: Jul 07

Baltimore, Md.

#13 Feb 10, 2013
You know, even our religious life if affected by these things. Now the so-called prosperity churches are edging out the more prophetic congregations. Somewhere in DEMOCRACY MATTERS AA philosopher Cornel West asks how it is that Dr. King's "I have a Dream" has been replaced by the "bling bling."
After making his criticisms of Marx, King nonetheless argues that "capitalism is always in danger of inspiring men to be more concerned about making a living than making a LIFE. We are more prone to judge success by the index of our salaries or the size of our automobiles rather than the quality of our service and relationship to humanity...."
Is life not more than bread and the body more than raiment, Du Bois asks.
West believes that in the post-1960s era vital communal institutions (which promote caring, service, etc) are frayed as market oriented values become dominant. Such values always had their influence, but previously those materialistic values were not the ONLY game in town.
So, how do we turn this situation around?
Harold_Darvey wrote:
I see far too much emphasis on style: fashion, cars, gadgets, and not enough attention paid to family, home and education.
I'm moderately successful, but driving through the hood, it's hard not to be struck by expensive cars -- much nicer than I would shell out money for -- sitting in front of mere tenements and slums with overdressed folks milling about with seemingly nothing to do.
That seems a priority way out of whack to me.
The FIRST concern of any parent should be to provide an environment that is safe and most of all NURTURING to a curious young mind, and instill in them a sense of drive to learn and better themselves.
I think we are failing our children when we let the streets raise them. With a few notable exceptions (celebrities), that kind of environment rarely produces anything worthwhile.

LAcreole
Level 5

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#14 Feb 10, 2013
Phoenix wrote:
<quoted text>
I don't believe that.
People just need to repent and turn to God.
I don't believe that either about turning to God. Black Americans are some of the most religious people. Maybe God need to stop turning away from them. I wasn't serious about the oxymoron statement, but too many younger folks of blacks need to turn back to the black values of their grandparents. Back in a terrible time, civil rights, the strongest and most respectable families were black, even more respectable than white families back then. I'm an80's baby so I wonder what caused such a humongous gap between the elders and today's youth.
holycrap

Powell, OH

#15 Feb 10, 2013
Savant wrote:
It was in 1903 that Du Bois wrote that the danger the old ideals of knowing and righteousness would sink into a quest for cash and a lust for gold.
At that time it was a DANGER. Has that danger now become reality for many?
Du Bois wondered: "What if the Negro people be wooed from a strife for righteousness, from a love of knowing, to regard DOLLARS as the be-all and end-all of life?"
Have not far too many of us been so wooed already? And with disastrous consequences for our personal and social lives?
Or do we still maintain a spiritual core?
I disagree. Striving for cash is key to financial independence which equals more freedom. "Money" is good to have. This is much like the argument some have against guns while ignoring it is not actually the gun doing the crimes and creating chaotic communities but it is the actual person doing it. Some people are simply wicked and whether they have cash or not will not change the wicked nature they possess. It's not the cash.
Tony Montana

Sarasota, FL

#16 Feb 10, 2013
First you get the money.

Then you get the power.

THEN you get the puccy.
holycrap

Powell, OH

#17 Feb 10, 2013
LAcreole wrote:
<quoted text>
I don't believe that either about turning to God. Black Americans are some of the most religious people. Maybe God need to stop turning away from them. I wasn't serious about the oxymoron statement, but too many younger folks of blacks need to turn back to the black values of their grandparents. Back in a terrible time, civil rights, the strongest and most respectable families were black, even more respectable than white families back then. I'm an80's baby so I wonder what caused such a humongous gap between the elders and today's youth.
Black Americans are religious people but they aren't spiritual people, imo. They don't believe their creator.

LAcreole
Level 5

Since: Jun 12

Location hidden

#18 Feb 10, 2013
holycrap wrote:
<quoted text>
Black Americans are religious people but they aren't spiritual people, imo. They don't believe their creator.
Hmmm I agree and disagree. The elders are very spiritual, but those my age and beyond...not at all. You're right. What do you mean by them not believing their creator?
Phoenix

Humble, TX

#19 Feb 10, 2013
LAcreole wrote:
<quoted text>I don't believe that either about turning to God. Black Americans are some of the most religious people. Maybe God need to stop turning away from them. I wasn't serious about the oxymoron statement, but too many younger folks of blacks need to turn back to the black values of their grandparents. Back in a terrible time, civil rights, the strongest and most respectable families were black, even more respectable than white families back then. I'm an80's baby so I wonder what caused such a humongous gap between the elders and today's youth.
I'm not talking about being religious.

I find those type of people can be dangerous at times.

I'm referring to people being spiritual with their personal relationship with God.
Phoenix

Humble, TX

#20 Feb 10, 2013
Tony Montana wrote:
First you get the money.

Then you get the power.

THEN you get the puccy.
Sir, there are some poor men with more than one woman.
Phoenix

Humble, TX

#21 Feb 10, 2013
LAcreole wrote:
<quoted text>Hmmm I agree and disagree. The elders are very spiritual, but those my age and beyond...not at all. You're right. What do you mean by them not believing their creator?
You can't judge a whole generation as such.

Change things then with God

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 3
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

African-American Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Most teacher-student statutory rapists are White 3 min Sir Jethro 17
Egyptians. Must leave Kemet Sacred lands and...... 6 min dcool 318
Y are White Men So Freaking HOT (Aug '13) 8 min Looking On 6
Le PAPYRUS de KAMARA 10 min dcool 696
News Barack Obama, our next President (Nov '08) 17 min Injudgement 1,374,397
News Confederate flag fan defends the stars & bars (Jun '15) 25 min Joe 230
Poll Will Donald Trump be the next President of the ... (Aug '15) 33 min TheOriginalDoby 1,425
Italians are NOT White!!!! (Feb '12) 54 min Angela 6,132
the moors were black africans not arabs!!! (Jun '08) 59 min Don Barros Serrano 43,458
Self hating biracials 2 hr Marcus Washington 70
Hebrew Israelite (Feb '11) 3 hr yisarel 133,157
HANNIBAL BARCA - of Carthage (North Africa) ... (Oct '07) 6 hr Don Barros Serrano 3,382
More from around the web