List of Notable Afro-Latinos

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#22 May 1, 2013
Alberto Santiago Lovell (1912–1966), known as Alberto Lovell, was a boxer Argentine heavyweight, who won the gold medal in the Olympic Games in Los Angeles 1932. In his career as a professional boxer, Argentine and South American champion, by 88 fights, which won 76 (KO 55), while defeated 8 times (2 KO), had 3 draws

Gold Medal in 1932

Alberto Lovell, age 20, won the gold medal in the heavyweight category at the Olympic Games in Los Angeles 1932 . Lovell eliminated in the first round the Finn Gunnar Barlund and then in the semifinals of the Canadian George Maughan, by TKO.

The final will be held on August 13 before the Italian Luigi Rovati, winning by knockout . Alberto Lovell's brother, William obtained the silver medal in 1936, and his son, Alberto Santiago, the quarter would finals in Tokyo in 1964, all at heavyweight.

Career

Entered the professionalism, November 19, 1938 was champion Argentine and South American heavyweight. On July 7, 1953 the Asociación Argentina de Box took the title and declared vacant because Lovell made no defense of it since 1944.

His first professional fight was against Eduardo Primo on January 20, 1934, losing by technical knockout. Santiago Lovell also beat Red Burman. His last fight was against Archie Moore in the Luna Park in Buenos Aires on July 7, 1951.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santiago_Lovell

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#23 May 2, 2013
This name uses Spanish naming customs; the first or paternal family name is Clemente and the second or maternal family name is Walker.

Roberto Clemente
Right fielderBorn: August 18, 1934
Carolina, Puerto RicoDied: December 31, 1972 (aged 38)
Off the coast of San Juan, Puerto RicoBatted: RightThrew: Right MLB debutApril 17, 1955, for the Pittsburgh PiratesLast MLB appearanceOctober 3, 1972, for the Pittsburgh PiratesCareer statisticsBatting average .317Hits 3,000Home runs 240Runs batted in 1,305TeamsPittsburgh Pirates (1955–1972)Career highlights and awards15× All-Star games (1960, 1960², 1961, 1961², 1962, 1962², 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972)

2× World Series champion (1960, 1971)

12× Gold Glove Award (1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972)

4× NL batting title (1961, 1964, 1965, 1967)

NL MVP (1966)

World Series MVP (1971)

Babe Ruth Award (1971)

Pittsburgh Pirates #21 retiredMember of the NationalBaseball Hall of Fame Induction 1973Vote 92.7%(first ballot)Roberto Clemente Walker (August 18, 1934 – December 31, 1972) was a Puerto Rican baseball right fielder who played 18 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1955 through 1972.

Clemente was awarded the National League (NL) Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award in 1966. He was a National League All-Star for twelve seasons (15 games), received 12 Gold Glove Awards, and led the National League in batting average four times. In 1972, Clemente got his 3,000th major league hit.

Off the field, Clemente was involved in charity work in Puerto Rico and other Latin American countries, often delivering baseball equipment and food to those in need. He died in an aviation accident on December 31, 1972, while en route to deliver aid to earthquake victims in Nicaragua.

Clemente was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame posthumously in 1973, becoming the first Latin American to be selected and one of only two Hall of Fame members for whom the mandatory five-year waiting period had been waived, the other being Lou Gehrig. Clemente is the first Hispanic player to win a World Series as a starter (1960), receive an MVP Award (1966), and receive a World Series MVP Award (1971).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roberto_Clemente

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#24 May 2, 2013
Juan Almeida Bosque (February 17, 1927 – September 11, 2009[1]) was a Cuban politician and one of the original commanders of the Cuban Revolution. After the 1959 revolution, he was a prominent figure in the Communist Party of Cuba; at the time of his death in 2009, he was a Vice-President of the Cuban Council of State and was its third ranking member. He received several decorations, and both national and international awards, including the title of "Hero of the Republic of Cuba" and the Order of Máximo Gómez.[2]
Contents
[hide]
1 Early life and revolution
2 Post-revolution
3 Death
4 Notes
5 References
6 External links[edit] Early life and revolution
Almeida was born in a poor area of Havana. He left school at the age of eleven and became a bricklayer.[3] Whilst studying law at the University of Havana in 1952, he became close friends with the revolutionary Fidel Castro and in March of that year joined the Cuban Revolution. In 1953 he joined Fidel and his brother Raúl Castro in the assault on the Moncada Barracks in Santiago, and was arrested and imprisoned with the Castro brothers in the Isle of Pines Prison.[1][4] During the amnesty of May 15, 1955, he was released and transferred to Mexico.
Almeida returned to Cuba with the Castro brothers, Che Guevara and 78 other revolutionaries on the Granma expedition, and was one of just 12 who survived the initial landing, during which Cuban government forces killed most of the rebels.[1] During the battle, Almeida shouted "No one here gives up!" (alternatively "here, nobody surrenders") to Guevara, which would become a long-lived slogan of the Cuban revolution.[1][3] Almeida was also reputed to be a good marksman.[5]

Following the landing, Almeida continued to fight Fulgencio Batista's government forces in the guerilla war in the Sierra Maestra mountain range.[1] In 1958, he was promoted to Commander and head of the Santiago Column of the Revolutionary Army.[4] During the revolution, as a black man in a prominent position, he served as a symbol to Afro-Cubans of change from Cuba's discriminatory past.[5]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juan_Almeida_Bos...

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#25 May 2, 2013
Paulo Renato Paim was born in Caxias do Sul, Rio Grande do Sul, on March 15, 1950.

He became a trained steelworker after receiving a professional education degree from SENAI. Paim worked on Abramo Eberle and Forjasul metallurgical factories before becoming the president of the Canoas steelworkers trade union on 1981. Two years later, he became Secretary-General of the Central Única dos Trabalhadores, prior to becoming the Vice-President of that same organization on 1984.

Political career

In 1985, Paim became a member of the Workers' Party (Partido dos Trabalhadores – PT) and, in the following year, became a federal deputy for the party. As a constituent deputy, he would engage in the writing of the current Constitution of Brazil. From 1989 to 1991, Paim was the deputy leader for the PT in the Chamber of Deputies. From 1993 to 1994, he was the head of the Chamber's Labour,

Administration and Public Service committee. In 1997, he authored a bill which would be enacted by President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva as the Elderly Statute, a set of laws which guarantees the rights of elderly people in Brazil. He became nationally known after the adoption of US$ 100 minimum wage, which he had proposed. Paim would later spark controversy, in 2001, after he ripped a copy of the Constitution as a protest to a bill seeking to change the Consolidation of Labor Laws.

In 2002, Paim was elected to the Federal Senate after a close race with fellow party member Emília Fernandes, the Senator for Rio Grande do Sul. From 2003 to 2005, he was Vice-President of the Senate. From 2007 to 2009, he was President of the upper house's Human Rights and Participative Legislation committee. In the Senate, Paim became known for defending higher pension checks for retired people. In 2010, Paim was re-elected Senator for Rio Grande do Sul with almost 34% of the valid votes. He received over 3.8 million votes; 479,362 more than Governor Tarso Genro, a fellow member of PT.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paulo_Paim
muminfreedomfigh ta

Brooklyn, NY

#26 May 2, 2013
Good stuff i enjoyed reading and learning about people i hadnt previously heard of or knew little about.

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#27 May 2, 2013
muminfreedomfighta wrote:
Good stuff i enjoyed reading and learning about people i hadnt previously heard of or knew little about.
:-)

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#28 May 2, 2013
Dr. José Ferrer Canales [note 1](September 18, 1913 – July 20, 2005) was an educator, writer and a pro-independence political activist.Early years

Ferrer Canales was born in Santurce, Puerto Rico into a poor working-class family. Despite the economic hardships his family faced, he was able to attend school. He received his elementary education at the Pedro G. Goyco Elementary School and his secondary instruction at Román Baldorioty de Castro School in San Juan...

In 1934, Ferrer Canales enrolled in the University of Puerto Rico. During his university years he met and befriended Dr. Pedro Albizu Campos, leader of the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party. This led to his active participation in the pro-independence movement. In 1937, he earned his Bachelors Degree in Arts, graduating Magna Cum Laude. In 1944, Canales earned his Masters Degree in Arts with his thesis: "Enrique José Varona". He felt influenced by the philosophic ideas of Varona, Eugenio María de Hostos and José Martí.[1]

Educator

Ferrer Canales taught high school Spanish in the town of Humacao from 1937 to 1943. After receiving his masters degree, he was hired as a Spanish professor at his alma mater. That same year the university also awarded him a grant to study Spanish and Latin American literature at Columbia University in New York City. In New York he was subject to racial discrimination however, that did not keep him from teaching Spanish at Hunter College.[2]

In 1946, he returned to the island and was offered a position in the Department of Humanities at the University of Puerto Rico. He was fired in 1948, due to the political unrest spreading throughout Puerto Rico and his pro-independence activism.[2]

Author

In 1949, he left the island and moved to the United States where he taught in various universities in Louisiana, Texas and Washington, D.C.. Ferrer Canales went to Mexico and enrolled in the National Autonomous University of Mexico where he earned his Doctorate Degree in Letters in 1952 with his thesis: "Varona, escritor".

In 1963, he returned to Puerto Rico and the University of Puerto Rico once again opened their doors to him. He taught Spanish literature and Political History. During this time he befriend Dr. Margot Arce de Vázquez who also served as an inspiration for his writings. He was invited as a quest speaker to many countries, among them the United States, Mexico, Cuba, Brazil, Canada, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela, Spain, France, Hungary and England.

Honors and recognitions

Ferrer Canales retired in 1983, however Puerto Rican anthropologist Ricardo Alegría convinced him to come out of retirement and to teach in the Center of Advanced Studies of Puerto Rico and the Caribbean. He also had a column in the daily newspaper El Nuevo Día. Ferrer Canales received many awards and recognitions during his lifetime, among them are the following:

Professor Emeritus of the University of Puerto Rico (1983).

Honorary Professor of the Humanities Faculty of the National Atonomus University Nacional of Santo Domingo (1987).

Honorary Professor of the UPR specializing in Eugenio María de Hostos (1989–1990).

Journalist Prize from the Institute of Puerto Rican Culture (1990).

Honorary member of the Cuban Teachers Association (1992).

Member of the Puerto Rican Academy of the Spanish Language (1992).

Prize of Honor of the Puerto Rican Athenaeum (1994).

The National Cultural Medal bestowed on him by the Cuban Minister of Culture (1995).

Named Humanist of the Year by the Puerto Rican Humanities Foundation (1997).

The Second International Book Fair of Puerto Rico was dedicated to Canales (1998).

Final years

Ferrer Canales died on July 20, 2005 at the Teachers' Hospital in Hato Rey, Puerto Rico, at the age of 91 and is survived by his wife Ana Hilda Betancourt. He is buried in the Villa Palmeras Cemetery.[3]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jos%C3%A9_Ferrer...

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#29 May 3, 2013
Excerpt:

Dr.Óscar Elías Biscet González (born: July 20, 1961 in Havana, Cuba), is a Cuban medical professional and an advocate for human rights and democratic freedoms in Cuba. He is also the founder of the Lawton Foundation.

Biscet was given a 25-year prison sentence in Cuba for allegedly committing crimes against the sovereignty and the integrity of the Cuban territory.[1] Despite appeals from the United Nations, foreign governments, and international human rights organizations, the Cuban Regime refused to release Biscet until March 11, 2011. In recognition of his advocacy efforts for human rights and democracy in Cuba, Biscet was presented with the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2007 by U.S. President George W. Bush.[2]

Beginnings

Biscet received a degree in medicine in 1985; the following year he initiated protests which led to his immediate suspension. Starting in 1988, Biscet revealed his political tension with the communist regime through speech. The Cuban government in 1994 officially opened a case file on Biscet, labeling him a counter-revolutionary and "dangerous". In 1997, Biscet founded the Lawton Foundation.

Political and philosophical background

Henry David Thoreau, Mohandas Gandhi, and Martin Luther King, Jr are major influences in Biscet's writing and motivation.[3] Others from whom Biscet has taken inspiration are Abraham Lincoln, Thomas Jefferson, José Martí, and Frederick Douglass. He is a strong believer in a democratic government[4] and advocates pro-life politics...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oscar_El%C3%ADas...

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#30 May 3, 2013
Guillermo Fariñas Hernández (born 3 January 1962)("El Coco") is a Cuban doctor of psychology,[1] independent journalist[2] and political dissident in Cuba. He has conducted 23 hunger strikes over the years to protest various elements of the Cuban regime.[3] He has stated that he is ready to die in the struggle against censorship in Cuba.[2]

Early life

Fariñas was born in Santa Clara. He won medals in 1981 while a Cuban soldier in Angola, when he fought under Colonel Antonio Enrique Luzon, and he was wounded in battle during the war. In 1982 Fariñas went to the U.S.S.R. to Tambov for military education. In 1993 he was elected in Cuba, as the General Secretary of Healthcare Union Workers.

In 1995 he was sent to jail after blowing the whistle on corrupt activities of the hospital board director.[citation needed] In an 2007 interview with Harper's magazine ("The Battle of Ideas") Fariñas described State Security officers detaining him in Santa Clara, forcibly committing him to a psychiatric hospital ward overnight, and supervising his injection with unknown drugs....

2006 hunger strike

In 2006, Fariñas held a seven-month hunger strike to protest against the Internet censorship in Cuba. He ended it in Autumn 2006, due to severe health problems.[2]

His acts received worldwide attention and Reporters Without Borders awarded its cyber-freedom prize to Guillermo Fariñas in 2006.[4] He also received the International Human Rights Award at Weimar.[5]

2010 hunger strike
On February 26, 2010, Fariñas declared yet another hunger strike to protest the death of fellow dissident Orlando Zapata Tamayo. He has indicated that he will remain on strike until twenty-six other prisoners of conscience who are seriously ill are set free.[3]

Cuban government response
"Cuba will not accept pressure or blackmail, important Western media groups are again calling attention to a prefabricated lie. It is not medicine that should resolve a problem that was created intentionally to discredit our political system -- but rather the patient himself, unpatriotic people, foreign diplomats and the media that manipulates him. The consequences will be their responsibility, and theirs alone."

— Granma, March 8, 2010 [6]

The Cuban state newspaper Granma stated that Fariñas's legal troubles began "because of a physical altercation with a female co-worker - not politics" and described him as "a paid agent of the United States" and employee of the U.S. Interests Section.[6]

On July 8, 2010, Fariñas ended his 134-day hunger strike Thursday, following signs the communist government is making good on its promise to release 52 political prisoners.

2010 Sakharov Prize

On 20 October 2010 Fariñas was awarded the Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought by the European Parliament.[7] In presenting the award the parliament commended Fariñas saying that he was a "symbol of the fight for freedom of speech".[8] This marks the third time that the award has been made to Cuban dissidents.[7]

In December 2010 the Cuban government denied Fariñas an exit visa necessary to travel to Strasbourg to accept the award. In response the European Parliament said that it would have an empty chair to represent him at the ceremony. Fariñas said, "I believe that the Cuban government has shown over the years that it is behaving in an arrogant manner."[9]

2011 hunger strike

On 3 June 2011, Fariñas declared his latest hunger strike to protest the Cuban authorities' response to fellow dissident Juan Wilfredo Soto García's death. Fariñas called for those responsible for the reported police beating three days before Soto died in a Santa Clara hospital to be brought to justice. He also demanded for the Cuban government to stop using violent means in its approach to non-violent opposition.[10]....

2012 detention...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guillermo_Fari%C...

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#31 May 3, 2013
Juan Evangelista Venegas (June 2, 1929 - 1980s) was a Puerto Rican boxer notable for winning Puerto Rico's first Olympic medal.

Early years

Venegas was born in an underprivileged section of San Juan, Puerto Rico where fighting was a common way of life. Many of the youth at that time saw the sport of boxing as a way to a better life. Among them was Venegas, who admired Puerto Rico's first international boxing champion, Sixto Escobar. Venegas took up boxing and his performance in the ring soon caught the attention of the island's recently-established Olympic Committee. In 1948 the Puerto Rican Olympic Committee included him in the delegation which would represent the island.

1948 Summer Olympics

The 1948 Summer Olympics celebrated in London, was a historical one for Puerto Rico because it was the first time that the island would participate as a nation in an international sporting event. The island's delegation consisted of twelve members.[1] In their opening ceremonies, the Puerto Rican delegation carried the flag of the United States into the Olympic stadium. The United States protested, claiming that two nations could not use the same flag at the same time. The decree of Commonwealth on July 25, 1952 would give the Puerto Rican delegation a flag of their own.[2]

In the 1948 Summer Olympics, known as the XIV Olympics, Juan Evangelista Venegas made Puerto Rican sports history by winning Puerto Rico's first Olympic medal ever when he beat Belgium's representative, Louis Callenboat, on points for a unanimous decision. He won the bronze medal in boxing in the Bantamweight division, falling short of the silver medal to Giovanni Zuddas.[3][4]

Professional boxing career

After returning to a hero's welcome to Puerto Rico, Venegas turned professional. In 1948, Venegas made his professional boxing debut against Puerto Rican Abelardo Alejandro. Venegas, a southpaw, fought in the bantamweight and featherweight division for a total of 32 fights, compiling a record of 20-10-2. His last fight was in 1958 against Al Tisi.[5]

Death and legacy

Juan Evangelista Venegas died in the 1980s when he suffered a fall at his home which caused a skull fracture. A week before his death, he was honored by the College of Engineers and Surveyors of Puerto Rico.[6]

In honor of his memory, the Puerto Rican Boxing Commission sponsors the Juan Evangelista Venegas boxing tournament, which serves as a tune-up to future Olympic boxing prospects.[3] There is a Juan Evagelista Venegas Olympic Cup which is given in other sports with Olympic orientation.[7]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juan_Evangelista...

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#32 May 3, 2013
Rudy Duthil (born October 16, 1982) is an American advertising executive of Dominican and Cuban descent best known for promoting the use of graffiti murals for advertising purposes across the United States. Duthil founded (in 2008) and served as director of Zoom Forward, a multicultural marketing division at Zoom Media & Marketing, after serving as their West Coast director of Experiential Marketing & Business Development.[1] In 2007, Duthil's was recognized by the ADCOLOR Industry Coalition's “ADCOLOR Awards” Rising Star Award.[2]

He has also been recognized by the Creative Media Awards on three occasions: Best Multicultural Creative Campaigns for Nicorette,[[Greyhound, and Ford in 2007, 2008 and 2009.[3] Duthil graduated from the University of Rhode Island. Rudy Duthil is also one of the founders of The Marcus Graham Project, an organization dedicated to developing leaders in advertising, media and marketing. In 2009 he founded the Results Driven Agency in Miami.[4]

Afro-Latino Activist

Rudy Duthil is also known for his activism in the Afro-Latino movement across the United States. He has published articles such as "Afro-Latino Youth Can Be Gateway For Marketers"[5] and "Crossing the Hispanic Color line"[6] on the Big Tent], a multicultural column featured on Advertising Age

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudy_Duthil

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#33 May 10, 2013
Fats Navarro
Fats Navarro, ca 1947. Photo by William P. Gottlieb.Background informationBirth nameTheodore NavarroAlso known asFats, Fat GirlBornSeptember 24, 1923
Key West, Florida, United StatesDiedJuly 7, 1950 (aged 26)
New York City, New York, United StatesGenresJazz
bebopOccupationsTrumpeter, composerInstrumentsTrumpetYear s active1943–1950Associated actsBilly Eckstine, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Bud Powell, Coleman Hawkins, Dizzy Gillespie, Lionel Hampton, Benny Goodman, Gil Evans, Andy Kirk, Charles Mingus, Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis, Kenny ClarkeNotable instrumentsTrumpetTheodore "Fats" Navarro (September 24, 1923 – July 7, 1950[1]) was an American jazz trumpet player. He was a pioneer of the bebop style of jazz improvisation in the 1940s. He had a strong stylistic influence on many other players, most notably Clifford Brown.

Navarro was born in Key West, Florida, of Cuban-Black-Chinese parentage. He began playing piano at age six, but did not become serious about music until he began playing trumpet at the age of thirteen. He was a childhood friend of drummer Al Dreares.[2] By the time he graduated from Douglass high school he wanted to be away from Key West and joined a dance band headed for the midwest.

Tiring of the road life after touring with many bands and gaining valuable experience, including influencing a young J. J. Johnson when they were together in Snookum Russell's territory band, Navarro settled in New York City in 1946, where his career took off. He met and played with, among others, Charlie Parker, one of the greatest musical innovators of modern jazz improvisation, but Navarro was in a position to demand a high salary, and did not join one of Parker's regular groups. He also developed a heroin addiction, which, coupled with tuberculosis and a weight problem (he was nicknamed "Fat Girl") led to a slow decline in his health and death at the age of twenty-six.

Among others, Fats Navarro played in the Andy Kirk, Billy Eckstine, Benny Goodman, and Lionel Hampton big bands, and participated in small group recording sessions with Kenny Clarke, Tadd Dameron, Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis, Coleman Hawkins, Illinois Jacquet, Howard McGhee, and Bud Powell.

In Charles Mingus' somewhat counter-factual autobiography Beneath the Underdog, Navarro and Mingus strike up a deep friendship while touring together. Navarro was hospitalized on July 1 and died in the evening of July 7, 1950. His last performance was with Charlie Parker on July 1 at Birdland.

Navarro was survived by wife Rena (née Clark; 1927–1975); his daughter Linda (born 1949), currently living in Seattle, Washington; and his sister Delores (Born 1932), still a resident of Key West.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fats_Navarro
muminfreedomfigh ta

Brooklyn, NY

#34 May 10, 2013
Mario Bauza was one of the first to bring latin music to the U.S. he played in chick webb's band at the savoy. He also introduced his brother in law Machito to american audiences. Chano Pozo would later become famous for his playing with Dizzy Gillespie. They were the first to associate their music with Africa by calling themselves Afro-Cubans.

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#35 May 11, 2013
Rivera, Ismael

Early life

Rivera was born in Santurce, Puerto Rico, a sector of San Juan, Puerto Rico. He was the first of five children born to Luis and Margarita Rivera. His father, Luis, was a carpenter and his mother a housewife. As a child, Rivera was always singing and banging on cans with sticks. He received his primary education at the Pedro G. Goyco Elementary School and then went on to learn carpentry at a vocational school. He also shined shoes to help his family financially and when he was 16 years old, he worked as a carpenter.[1] During his free time he would hang around the corner with his best friend Rafael Cortijo and sing songs.[2] In 1948, Rivera and Cortijo joined El Conjunto Monterrey, where Rivera played the conga and Cortijo the bongos. Rivera was unable to work full-time as a musician because of his work as a carpenter.

Musical career [edit]

In 1952, Rivera joined the U.S. Army but was quickly discharged, because he didn't speak English. When he returned to Puerto Rico, he went to work as a lead singer with Orquesta Panamericana, thanks to the recommendation of his friend Cortijo. With Orquesta Panamericana, Rivera recorded and scored his first hits with the songs "El charlatán", "Ya yo sé", "La vieja en camisa" and "La sazón de Abuela". However, an incident between Rivera and another band member, over a girl, led to his departure from the popular band. In 1954, he joined Cortijo's Combo and recorded the following songs, which soon became hits in the American Latin community:[3]

External audio

You may listen to Ismael Rivera's "Las Caras Linda " here."El Bombón de Elena"

"El Negro Bembón"

"Juan José"

"Besitos de Coco"

"Palo Que Tú Me Das"

"Quítate de la Vía Perico"

"Oriza"

"El Chivo de la Campana"

"Maquinolandera"

"El Yayo"

"María Teresa"

"Yo Soy del Campo"

El Sonero Mayor [edit]

Cortijo's Combo continued to gain fame and so did Rivera's reputation as a lead singer. Rivera was named sonero mayor by Cuban producer Ángel Maceda, owner of club Bronx Casino in New York; this is based in an interview done to Ismael.

The band went to New York City and played in the famed Palladium Ballroom, where the orchestras of Tito Rodríguez, Tito Puente and Charlie Palmieri also played.[2]

Rivera married Virginia Fuente on 1951. He also had relationships with other women like Gladis Serrano, who was the wife of Daniel Santos. Rivera had five children: Ismael, Jr., Carlos, Margarita, Caridad, and Orquídea. In 1959, Rivera, together with Cortijo and his Combo, participated in the European produced movie titled Calipso, starring Harry Belafonte. He traveled with Cortijo's Combo, which also included Rafael Ithier and Roberto Roena, to Europe, Central and South America.

Rivera was arrested for drug possession after a trip to Panama with the Cortijo combo. According to later reports, various band members regularly concealed illegal drug shipments, but this time the Customs inspectors were waiting for them. Rivera took the fall, sparing other members. But this event led to the break-up of Cortijo's Combo. Shortly after, Rafael Ithier regrouped some of the former members and formed El Gran Combo de Puerto Rico.[3]

Upon his release from jail, Rivera formed his own band called Ismael Rivera and his Cachimbos. This successful band lasted for eight years....

Legacy

On October 5, 2008, Puerto Rico's governor Aníbal Acevedo Vilá signed a proclaim stating that every anniversary of Rivera's birth will be celebrated as "Día Conmemorativo del Natalicio de Ismael Rivera".[5]

On September 27, 2001, the Puerto Rican Senate approved the law #134 declaring October 5 as "Ismael Rivera Day". In Villa Palmeras, Santurce, Puerto Rico, there is a plaza named "Plaza de los Salseros" which has a statue and plaque dedicated to Ismael.[6] Celia Cruz recorded a tribute to Ismael Rivera and so did Dario y su ComboRican.[7]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ismael_Rivera

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#36 May 11, 2013
Rivera, Ismael

Early life

Rivera was born in Santurce, Puerto Rico, a sector of San Juan, Puerto Rico. He was the first of five children born to Luis and Margarita Rivera. His father, Luis, was a carpenter and his mother a housewife. As a child, Rivera was always singing and banging on cans with sticks. He received his primary education at the Pedro G. Goyco Elementary School and then went on to learn carpentry at a vocational school. He also shined shoes to help his family financially and when he was 16 years old, he worked as a carpenter.[1] During his free time he would hang around the corner with his best friend Rafael Cortijo and sing songs.[2] In 1948, Rivera and Cortijo joined El Conjunto Monterrey, where Rivera played the conga and Cortijo the bongos. Rivera was unable to work full-time as a musician because of his work as a carpenter.

Musical career [edit]

In 1952, Rivera joined the U.S. Army but was quickly discharged, because he didn't speak English. When he returned to Puerto Rico, he went to work as a lead singer with Orquesta Panamericana, thanks to the recommendation of his friend Cortijo. With Orquesta Panamericana, Rivera recorded and scored his first hits with the songs "El charlatán", "Ya yo sé", "La vieja en camisa" and "La sazón de Abuela". However, an incident between Rivera and another band member, over a girl, led to his departure from the popular band. In 1954, he joined Cortijo's Combo and recorded the following songs, which soon became hits in the American Latin community:[3]

External audio

You may listen to Ismael Rivera's "Las Caras Linda " here."El Bombón de Elena"

"El Negro Bembón"

"Juan José"

"Besitos de Coco"

"Palo Que Tú Me Das"

"Quítate de la Vía Perico"

"Oriza"

"El Chivo de la Campana"

"Maquinolandera"

"El Yayo"

"María Teresa"

"Yo Soy del Campo"

El Sonero Mayor [edit]

Cortijo's Combo continued to gain fame and so did Rivera's reputation as a lead singer. Rivera was named sonero mayor by Cuban producer Ángel Maceda, owner of club Bronx Casino in New York; this is based in an interview done to Ismael.

The band went to New York City and played in the famed Palladium Ballroom, where the orchestras of Tito Rodríguez, Tito Puente and Charlie Palmieri also played.[2]...

Later years

Rivera was a faithful pilgrim of the Black Christ procession in Portobelo, Panama, from 1975 to 1985, and even wrote a song about the Black Christ, known affectionately as "El Nazareno".[4] Rivera was baptized as the "Brujo de Borinquen" in Panama.

Legacy

On October 5, 2008, Puerto Rico's governor Aníbal Acevedo Vilá signed a proclaim stating that every anniversary of Rivera's birth will be celebrated as "Día Conmemorativo del Natalicio de Ismael Rivera".[5]

On September 27, 2001, the Puerto Rican Senate approved the law #134 declaring October 5 as "Ismael Rivera Day". In Villa Palmeras, Santurce, Puerto Rico, there is a plaza named "Plaza de los Salseros" which has a statue and plaque dedicated to Ismael.[6] Celia Cruz recorded a tribute to Ismael Rivera and so did Dario y su ComboRican.[7]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ismael_Rivera

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#37 May 12, 2013
Pedro Albizu Campos[note 1](September 12, 1891[4]– April 21, 1965) was a Puerto Rican attorney, politician, and the leading figure in the Puerto Rican independence movement. Gifted in languages, he spoke six and was the first Puerto Rican to graduate from Harvard Law School.

Albizu Campos was the president and spokesperson of the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party from 1930 until his death in 1965. Because of his oratorical skill, he was hailed as El Maestro (The Teacher). He was imprisoned 26 years for attempting to overthrow the U.S. government in Puerto Rico.

In 1950 he planned and called for armed uprisings in several cities in Puerto Rico on behalf of independence. Afterward he was convicted and imprisoned again. He died in 1965 shortly after his pardon and release from federal prison, some time after suffering a stroke. There is controversy over his medical treatment in prison.

Legacy [edit]

Albizu's legacy is the subject of discussion among supporters and detractors. His followers state that Albizu's political and military actions served as a primer for positive change in Puerto Rico, these being:

the improvement of labor conditions for peasants and workers

a more accurate assessment of the colonial relationship between Puerto Rico and the United States

an awareness of this colonial relationship, by the political establishment in Washington, D.C.

The Pedro Albizu Campos statue and monument, at the Park named for him in his birthplace of Ponce, Puerto Rico.

External audio

You may listen to one of the speeches made in Spanish by Albizu Campos hereand view a portion of the Albizu Documentary Trailer made in English here.Albizu can definitely be credited with preserving and promoting Puerto Rican Nationalism and national symbols, at a time where they were virtually taboo in the country - and even actively outlawed by Law 53, known as La Ley de la Mordaza (the Gag Law). The formal adoption of the Puerto Rican flag as a national emblem by the Puerto Rican government can be traced to Albizu; the revival of public observance of the Grito de Lares and its significant icons was a direct mandate from him as leader of the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party.

Albizu was the most vocal and prominent Puerto Rican of African descent of his generation. He had primarily European (Spanish) ancestry from both parents, with mixed ancestry in his mother's line. Afro-Puerto Rican leaders of other political affiliations (such as Ernesto Ramos Antonini and Jose Celso Barbosa) attained similar status only after facing (and enduring) considerable discrimination from racism. Albizu, while not exempt from it, confronted it and denounced it publicly.

Honors [edit]

In Chicago, an alternative high school was named the Dr. Pedro Albizu Campos High School.

In New York City, Public School 161 in Harlem is named after him.

In Puerto Rico, five public schools are named after him, as well as streets in most of Puerto Rico's municipalities.

In his birthplace city of Ponce, there is a Pedro Albizu Campos Park and lifesize statue dedicated to his memory.

In 1993, Chicago alderman Billy Ocasio, in supporting a statue of Albizu Campos in Humboldt Park, likened him to such American leaders including Patrick Henry, Chief Crazy Horse, John Brown, Frederick Douglass, and W.E.B. Dubois.[44]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pedro_Albizu_Cam...

Since: May 10

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#38 May 15, 2013
...Luis Antonio Valencia Mosquera (born 4 August 1985), commonly known as Antonio Valencia (Spanish pronunciation:[anˈton jo βaˈlensja]), is an Ecuadorian footballer who currently plays as a winger for Manchester United and the Ecuadorian national team.[5] He has also occasionally been deployed as a utility right back for Manchester United.

After progressing through the youth system at El Nacional, Valencia became a first team regular and made over 80 appearances for the club before signing for La Liga side Villarreal CF in 2005. He only made two league appearances for the Spanish side in between successful loan spells at Recreativo de Huelva for the 2005–06 season and later English Premier League club Wigan Athletic from 2006 to 2008. Wigan later signed Valencia on a three-year deal for an undisclosed fee in January 2008. His performances for Wigan soon attracted attention from several high profile clubs and he turned down a move to Real Madrid before signing for Manchester United in June 2009. Valencia has since won the 2009–10 Football League Cup, the 2010 FA Community Shield, and the 2010–11 Premier League during his time at Manchester United, along with being voted into PFA Team of the Year in his debut season.

Valencia made his Ecuador debut in 2005 and scored two goals in the process. He represented his country at the 2006 FIFA World Cup, the 2007 Copa América and the 2011 Copa América. Since making his debut, Valencia has won 55 caps and scored seven goals for his country.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antonio_Valencia

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#39 May 16, 2013
Black boxer mayweather beats down white latino ...
http://www.topix.com/forum/afam/TFS6T8E60SNKS...

Biography

Manuel L. Posadas was born in Buenos Aires in 1860, the son of a musician, journalist and soldier Manuel G. Posadas and Emilia Smith. He was the brother of Carlos Posadas, who also excelled in the local industry. He showed talent for music, studying in the School of Music of the province of Buenos Aires in 1875, being a disciple of Pedro Ripari.

In 1879 he traveled to Belgium to improve his studies, entering the Royal Conservatory of Brussels where he studied under some of the great European masters of the era, including the violin and Belgian composer Eugene Ysaye. He performed as a violinist at the Teatro Real of the galleries there and in 1882 he returned to Buenos Aires offering on arrival a concert at the Coliseum Theatre on 9 September of that year.

He returned to Brussels for a while, but finally settled back in his native city, devoting himself to teaching music. He became first violin of the Teatro Colón and taught at the National Institute for the Blind. Among his students were told the teacher Juan José Castro (1895—1968), a leading composer and conductor.

He also directed some of the bands that inspired the dance of Carnival in the city: the daily La Tribune in its edition of February 11, 1903 reported that "The Argentine Politeama dances presented at the next innovation that will surely be received with satisfaction by the item dancer. The company has paid particular attention to organize an orchestra of 40 full professors in Argentina, under the direction of maestro Manuel Posadas."

He died in Buenos Aires in 1916.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manuel_Posadas

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manuel_Posadas

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#40 May 16, 2013
Inclusion of the boxing-thread link was unintentional.

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#41 May 16, 2013
Orlando Manuel "Peruchin" Cepeda Pennes (Spanish pronunciation:[orˈlan do seˈpeða]; born September 17, 1937) is a former Puerto Rican Major League Baseball first baseman.

Cepeda was born to a poor family. His father, Pedro Cepeda, was a baseball player in Puerto Rico, which influenced his interest in the sport from a young age. His first contact with professional baseball was as a batboy for the Santurce Crabbers of Puerto Rico. Pedro Zorilla, the team's owner, persuaded his family to let him attend a New York Giants tryout. He played for several Minor League Baseball teams before attracting the interest of the Giants, who had just moved to San Francisco.

During a career that lasted sixteen years, he played with the San Francisco Giants (1958–66), St. Louis Cardinals (1966–68), Atlanta Braves (1969–72), Oakland Athletics (1972), Boston Red Sox (1973), and Kansas City Royals (1974). Cepeda was selected to play in seven Major League Baseball All-Star Games during his career, becoming the first player from Puerto Rico to start one. In 1978, Cepeda was sentenced to five years in prison on drug possession charges, of which he served ten months in prison and the rest on probation. In 1987, Cepeda was contracted by the San Francisco Giants to work as a scout and "goodwill ambassador." In 1999, Cepeda was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame by the Veterans

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orlando_Cepeda

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