ALCOA Research Lab

Pictures, photos and images from New Kensington, PA

Upload a photo »

Showing photos 11 - 20 out of 75 in New Kensington Photos

New Kensington, PA - Located on Freeport Rd.  In the Background can be seen Edgewood and Knollwood Rd.  Edgewood Elementary site can be seen on the NEW Knollwood Rd (still under construction)   (original bldg grades 1-6)

Picture of ALCOA Research Lab posted in the New Kensington, PA gallery

Located on Freeport Rd. In the Background can be seen Edgewood and Knollwood Rd. Edgewood Elementary site can be seen on the NEW Knollwood Rd (still under construction) (original bldg grades 1-6)

Picture posted by Parnassus Yewt on Sep 26 '09

« Back to New Kensington Forum

Parnassus Yewt

Damascus, MD

#1 Sep 26, 2009
I went to 1-3 grades there. Miss Fink, Miss Bowser, Miss Stahl. Then moved to Parnassus, PA (part of NewKen of course)
Parnassus Packer

Damascus, MD

#2 Sep 29, 2009
DESCRIPTION: The Alcoa Research Laboratory is in a park-like setting on Freeport Road
overlooking New Kensington and the Allegheny River Valley. The building's design shows influences
of neo-CIassicism and the Art-Deco style and was executed by renowned Pittsburgh architect Henry
Hornbostle. The two-story building is 275' long with 108' wings at each end and a total of 56,000
square feet of floor space. There are a number of one-, two-, and three-story wings adjoining its rear
(east) facade. The main (west) facade features twenty-one bays, each of which is separated by
inscribed decorative limestone pilasters. The multi-light windows of the first and second floors are
separated by a band of ornate aluminum panels. An intricately detailed aluminum railing serves as a
parapet wall and extends around the flat roof of the main building. The entrance contains four bays
that project beyond the main facade. A stone stairway leads to the entrance, which features ornate
aluminum gates; the double doors leading to the interior entrance hall contain panels with floral and
shamrock motifs of hand-wrought aluminum. The entrance hall has marble floors. Aluminum stair
railings, light fixtures, baseboards, heating grates, door jambs and knobs are found in abundance
throughout the main building. There are also crafted aluminum chairs and desks, and in the basement
there are three ornate aluminum bookcases reportedly made for the Hunt family. An aluminum
elevator in the center of the building was used for carrying heavy equipment and supplies to the upper
floors where the laboratories were located. The rear wings to the main building contain buff-brick
walls, structural steel frames, and multi-light pivoting windows. A 135' tall brick chimney rises above
one of the wings and the main building.
HISTORY: Aluminum is one of the most plentiful elements in the world, forming about eight percent
of the earth's crust. Aluminum occurs in nature in combination with other minerals, and although a
process was developed to separate aluminum from other minerals in the late 1820s, this separation
process was too expensive to be commercially feasible. Charles Martin Hall discovered an electrolytic
process of making aluminum that was commercially applicable in 1886. Hail's process for making
aluminum was a dual method in which a powder called "alumina" (aluminum oxide) was produced
from bauxite ore by a chemical process in a digester. The alumina was then transformed into
aluminum by a smelting process in a flux of cryolite, activated by an electric current in "pot lines" of
steel cells. Paul Heroult, a French chemist, simultaneously discovered a similar process in a crude lab
in a tannery in Gentilly near Paris and received an American patent in 1886. A heated dispute
between Hall and Hercouit ensued over patent ownership during this period.
In 1888 Hall convinced a group of Pittsburgh capitalists headed by Captain Alfred Hunt to invest in
his new aluminum-producing process. Hunt furnished $20,000 capital and an experimental laboratory
on Smallman Street in Pittsburgh. Andrew Mellon and his brother Richard K. Mellon, Pittsburgh
bankers, provided venture capital to Hall's new Pittsburgh Reduction Company. On Thanksgiving
Day 1888, Hall and his assistant Arthur Vining Davis turned out the first ingot of aluminum and a
new industry was born. The Smallman Street experimental plant had increased its production from
fifty pounds to 500 pounds of aluminum per day by the time the firm constructed a new facility along
the Allegheny River in 1891 (see entry below).
The Pittsburgh Reduction Company name was changed to Aluminum Company of America (Alcoa) in
1907,

“Ken Hi and Springdale Hi”

Since: Jul 08

Glendale CA,

#3 Oct 1, 2009
What year was this photo taken? When I lived there It was a field where we played(40s)football and basketball. Remember, it caught fire a few times.
Olderndirt

Chardon, OH

#4 Oct 1, 2009
Parsec Sam wrote:
What year was this photo taken? When I lived there It was a field where we played(40s)football and basketball. Remember, it caught fire a few times.
Hey Sam, How's the man who loves women who love men, at least you used too, doing??
I think the pic isn't the Alcoa lab. I think it's the building owned by Alcoa that's near St. Pete's Church. The lab had a white brick wall surrounding it. We referred to that big field as "the lab field", that was covered with knee high grass where one could sometime kick out native ringnecks, and rabbits. I recall seeing bobwhite quail there too. Hey Sam, do you remember the waterfall that was near the lab?

“Ken Hi and Springdale Hi”

Since: Jul 08

Glendale CA,

#5 Oct 7, 2009
Olderndirt wrote:
<quoted text>
Hey Sam, How's the man who loves women who love men, at least you used too, doing??
I think the pic isn't the Alcoa lab. I think it's the building owned by Alcoa that's near St. Pete's Church. The lab had a white brick wall surrounding it. We referred to that big field as "the lab field", that was covered with knee high grass where one could sometime kick out native ringnecks, and rabbits. I recall seeing bobwhite quail there too. Hey Sam, do you remember the waterfall that was near the lab?
Hey Bob:I am doing great and I still do! I am having a great time in Ukiah, CA, which is 145 miles North of San Francisco. It is beautiful up here. The Symphony and the Playhouse are co-producing my play Cancel Christmas, so I came up to help them promote it. They had a great turn out for the auditions, the Mendicino Book Store is selling my book and I was interviewed on the radio yesterday. I return to LA on the 15th. There is another theater group producing the play in LA Harbra, plus it is being done in New Jersey and in Utah. Overseas it is being done in Poland and the Georgia Republic - It is getting around.
Are you back in Crooked Creek? It must be beautiful this time of the year. I send my regards.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Read all 27 comments about this picture »

Add your comments about this photo

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

New Kensington Info

New Kensington, Pennsylvania is located in Westmoreland County. Zip codes in New Kensington, PA include 15069, and 15068. More New Kensington information.